Register  |   | 
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment  
Gina

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 2,252
Reply with quote  #1 
Yesterday I went to a park in a neighboring town that had been the estate of a local plant collector, probably in the 1920s or 30s. I found 2 fig trees. One a large labeled Ficus capensis (cape fig), and another Ficus carica (I assume) with small dark figs that turned out to be pollen producers. I did not have my camera, but did snag a cutting (slender shoot with a few roots) of the pollen producer. Did not think to pick up one of the figs.

Here is a photo of the cutting I got. The leaves are fine pubescent on the backs, and the stems and petioles are reddish. The tree itself was rather straggly looking but relatively healthy.

I don't know if there are wasps in my area or not. I doubt it, but if there are, might as well have a tree that produces pollen. :)

Attached Images
jpeg fig_pollen.jpg (450.31 KB, 78 views)


__________________


WillsC's new fig forum:   http://www.Ourfigs.com  (and blueberries)

svanessa

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 903
Reply with quote  #2 
Gina,
You might want to cut the leaves off and put the pot inside a plastic bag to keep up the humidity. Too much of the stem is exposed to the air and will more than likely dry out before it can root. The leaves are transpiring and will accelerate the dessication of the cutting as well.

Personally, I would have cut this in half and bagged it with damp sphagnum moss to root first. Cuttings need to be in a humid, not wet, environment for successful rooting, at least that's been my experience.

The stems of the leaves are very pretty. If this was a known persistant caprifig I might hit you up for cuttings. ;-)

Sue

__________________
Sue
Zone 9B, 1946'
Ramona, CA
San Diego County
Gina

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 2,252
Reply with quote  #3 
I just removed it from it's 'humidity chamber' for the photo. It's already looking happier, and it has some roots so I thought I would give the whole thing a chance. I have another cutting that is smaller and in damp mix up to it's neck. The original tree is also still a possibility for cuttings (obviously within reason - it is in a park). I just didnt have anything sharp in the car (besides wit) - not even a stray plastic knife under the seats.

What do you mean by 'known persistent caprifig'? The tree is unlabeled, and the figs on it seemed to be all of one type just from a visual inspection. I will take my camera next time. That coudl be as early as tomorrow, but dont know for sure. In botanical circles, the park is well-known for having very unusual plants. Unfortunately there isn't much money to keep the place up very well, and it's suffered since the last time I was there.

There used to be a picnic area where there used to be some old fig trees (we used to play hide and seek there) but they are now totally gone, as was the original garden shed and coffee tree. The memory of those figs is why I went. I hadnt' been there in years.

__________________


WillsC's new fig forum:   http://www.Ourfigs.com  (and blueberries)

svanessa

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 903
Reply with quote  #4 

Gina,

Persistent is another name for Common, no pollination needed. You will not get any common figs if you breed to a Caducous caprifig.

Per Ray Given's website:

Edible figs are divided into three classes:
1. Caducous (or Smyrna) figs which need pollination to set crops. Examples are Marabout, Calimyrna (or Sari
Lop), and Zidi.
2. Persistent (or Common) figs which do not need pollination to set crops. These are the kind home gardeners
most commonly grow. Examples are Black Mission, Brown Turkey, Celeste, Brunswick and Adriatic.
3. Intermediate Group (or San Pedro) figs which do not need pollination to set a breba crop, but do need it for
the main crop (in some environments). Examples are King, Lampeira, and (of course) San Pedro.

Using a persistent caprifig as the pollen parent will yield a progeny consisting of roughly 25% each of
caducous caprifigs, persistent caprifigs, caducous edible figs and persistent edible figs

Using a caducous caprifig as the pollen parent will yield a progeny of roughly 50% caducous caprifigs,
50% caducous edible figs and 0% persistent caprifigs and edible figs.


__________________
Sue
Zone 9B, 1946'
Ramona, CA
San Diego County
hoosierbanana

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 2,295
Reply with quote  #5 
Nice work Gina, it could turn out to be a great Daddy someday. I would pick some figs and put them in a jar to see if any wasps are present.
__________________
7a, DE "While you were hanging yourself on someone else's words. Dying to believe in what you heard. I was staring straight into the shining sun"
BLB

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 2,934
Reply with quote  #6 
That is a very cool find, nice work!!
Gina

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 2,252
Reply with quote  #7 
Here is an update of the 'found' caprifig. There are roots coming out the bottom (second picture), and some on the top, and the terminal bud is beginning to swell and about to grow.

I still haven't been back to see if there are any wasps in the caprifigs that the tree was producing. Perhaps tomorrow since I'll be near there again.

I recently did talk to someone who at one time had the fig wasp, and they said caprifigs often have slender stems.

Click on photos to enlarge.

Attached Images
jpeg fig_caprifig.jpg (87.32 KB, 39 views)
jpeg fig_carprifig_roots_s.jpg (103.26 KB, 32 views)


__________________


WillsC's new fig forum:   http://www.Ourfigs.com  (and blueberries)

stefpix

Registered:
Posts: 158
Reply with quote  #8 
Vanessa I thought persistent figs produced no viable seeds 

"Using a persistent caprifig as the pollen parent will yield a progeny consisting of roughly 25% each of
caducous caprifigs, persistent caprifigs, caducous edible figs and persistent edible figs"

"

__________________
--
stefano
lampo

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 2,376
Reply with quote  #9 
Hello everybody,
The pics, particularly, the redish colour of the leaf stalks rang the bell . I saw/read that before long time ago...In fact, describing the available caprifigs in CA at his time, G.Eisen points out to the fact that the 'MITCHELL' caprifig variety is the only one with bright red leaf stalks.

This particular variety may well be the late producer of wasps for the San Francisco area.
If this assumption is correct the tree could show now both profichi and mammoni figs...some profichi half or totally dried may be found on the ground.The young mammoni, firm,green and growing will carry the Summer generation of wasps still in early larval development,I guess. I believe that it will be difficult at this stage to find and living female wasps.
Francisco
svanessa

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 903
Reply with quote  #10 
Stefpix, We are basically saying the same thing. Presistant/common/edible figs (female tree) will ripen without caprification but they can be caprified. The seeds will not be viable unless they are caprified.

You need a persistant caprifig to create a persistant female common/edible fig from seed. You will never get a persistant/common fig from a caudacious caprifig. There's only a 25% chance this will happen and even lower odds the fig produced from the seed will be better than the original mother.

__________________
Sue
Zone 9B, 1946'
Ramona, CA
San Diego County
Forrest

Registered:
Posts: 89
Reply with quote  #11 
Gina, where is this park? Is it Quail Gardens? I am in Del Mar, hi!
__________________
San Diego, North County Coastal
stefpix

Registered:
Posts: 158
Reply with quote  #12 
Vanessa to never get or to have a 25 % chance to get a common fig from a caprifig is different. I am curious as I sowed seeds of Calimyrna dried seeds and got a bunch of seedlings i may just use as ornamental or bonsai. one is vigorous and fast growing in a shallow pot. I wonder what are the chances. After all a lot of common figs that are named varieties at some point they must just have been wild figs sprouted from seed. The only way to get new varieties is sexual reproduction after all.
__________________
--
stefano
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.