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nana7b

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Reply with quote  #1 
I have had pretty good luck grafting fig cuttings this year. About a 80% success rate.
The grafts and cuttings were started on the same day. Approximately the first week of February.

My plan now is to push some growth on the grafted ones and air layer them. Just wanted put this out there to encourage others to try this method.

Attached Images
jpeg 2012GraftsCuttings.jpg (101.95 KB, 223 views)
jpeg 2012_RootedCuttings.jpg (69.08 KB, 149 views)
jpeg 2012_GraftedCuttings.jpg (137.38 KB, 178 views)


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Ruvan
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Boris

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Reply with quote  #2 

 The plants look very nice. Please give us some details on this success story.

What method have you used for grafting?

Was the rootstock  in the pot where it grew up last year or you grafted a bare root plant and had freshly transplanted it?

 Was the rootstock dormant?

 Where have you kept the pots after?

 And finally, what variety is the rootstock?

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Reply with quote  #3 

Very interesting.  I have the same questions here.  What information is out there concerning the best root stock for figs or is this a pretty new topic?  What are the benefits of using a different rootstock?


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Reply with quote  #4 
I'm very interested in your technique as well. I did some grafting this spring for the same reason (to air layer into individual plants later). I had also hoped to graft my UCD cuttings, but they still haven't arrived, and the trees I planned to graft onto have quite a bit of new foliage--does anyone know whether it's a problem to use a rootstock that has already leafed out?
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Reply with quote  #5 
Boris, TMC and Ken,

Rootstock - Celeste cuttings that I rooted in the spring of 2011. They were not given much attention and remained pretty small which worked out well for grafting. I placed them in the garage around mid November as they went dormant.
Once I ordered the cuttings from Jon I brought them inside the house and placed them near a south facing window. This was about a week before grafting. My thought was to bring it out of dormancy.

Graft - I used a wedge graft. Cut the scion at approximately 20 degrees. Cut a wedge on the root stock and push the scion in to where the cambium matches at least on one side. Then wrap tightly with parafilm.

Care - After grafting I placed them in a bin and create a tent out of plastic to keep the humidity in. I also place a lamp near by for light. It was placed near a south facing window. Every evening or so I would remove the cover and air-out the container. Sometimes I would spray some water. After about a few days the buds turn green and begin to swell. Progress seemed pretty slow.

After about a month and a half I brought them outside and gradually acclimated to sunlight. The nice thing with grafting is that you can fertilize the plant. I am trying to get some good growth while the weather is nice and not too hot. In a couple of months it will start to get very hot here in Texas and things will slow down considerably.  I am currently watering them with rain water followed by diluted MG. They seem to be responding nicely so far.

I did have a couple of failures. One graft seem to take off within a week but then I had to be out of town for a 4 days. I left the light off in my absence. When I got back that particular graft was failing. The rootstock had also started to produce another shoot from below the soil line. The combination of energy going to the new shoot plus lack of light and adequate air exchange probably did not help. Some of the other grafts also dropped a couple of leaves.

Ken, regarding grafting on to already leafed rootstock - I did graft a couple of scions I received after my Celeste leafed out. Progress seems slow. One failed, two are hanging in there. Part of the problem is that the branches I chose are shaded.
I went ahead and air layered these so that I can move then soon and get them a bit more light. My advise would be to go ahead and try. For grafting you need only a small piece of scion wood. I think it is good insurance for a 'rare' variety.

I hope I answered your questions. If not please ask.

Attached Images
jpeg scion_celeste.jpg (160.99 KB, 109 views)
jpeg grafting1.jpg (139.31 KB, 93 views)
jpeg grafting2.jpg (146.68 KB, 101 views)
jpeg grafting3.jpg (149.60 KB, 117 views)
jpeg grafting4.jpg (175.02 KB, 123 views)


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james

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Reply with quote  #6 
I was planning on doing some grafting this year, but decided to wait until next year.  I have rooted cuttings of varieties that I want to graft and varieties that I want to use as rootstock.  My thought is it will allow for better comparison if the rootstock and the rooted cuttings are the same age.  I did, however, come across a few problems.
  1. not all of the varieties that I wanted to graft onto the rootstock were available this year to compare to next year.
  2. all of my trees had broken dormancy before cuttings arrived this year.  If the cuttings are late arriving next year, I may have to keep my rootstock dormant in the fridge.

I plan to use LSU Purple as my rootstock.  I also rooted some Celeste cuttings that I received from Frank that I will graft onto as well.  In my experience with LSU Purple (in containers) it seems to be the ideal rootstock.  It is a prolific rooter and does not sucker too much (if at all).  Also, if the graft fails, or the tree dies back, it's still a very good fig to have.  The varieties I plan to graft onto the rootstock are those that I have found to be hard to root and slow to grow.  It seems to me if the variety is one, it is the other as well.  Unfortunately, of the 5 varieties I had compiled on the list, I received only one (a single Black Madeira from UCD cutting) variety.  So I will have to use some of the other varieties that I have rooted this year.


~james


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Reply with quote  #7 
James,

I think I agree with you on the LSU purple. I just planted one in ground. I got it from EL in the spring of 2011. I potted it in a large pot last fall. By the time I took it out this evening I was able to pull the whole root ball intact. The roots of VDB and HC were no where as vigorous as LSU purple. I may have to air layer some of these just in case for next year!


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Reply with quote  #8 
Quote:
the trees I planned to graft onto have quite a bit of new foliage--does anyone know whether it's a problem to use a rootstock that has already leafed out
?

Hey Ken. I'm thinking you may still have time to try some grafts. As long as your rootstock is actively growing they may take for you. I'm just making a suggestion here but, if it were me, I'd at least try some. Bass and some others may know more here than I do.

Another option would be to wrap some of the scion up nice & tight in plastic wrap and store them in the fridge until next spring. I actually did this with some scionwood that I got from UCD last year. I've grafted some of that material recently and a few of those are now budding out. Two varieties in particular that I wanted to graft were Black Ischia and Black Madeira. Both of those are beginning to show some bud swelling. So far so good.

If anyone has been thinking about grafting figs but haven't yet, I say give it a shot. IMO, there's potential to have a better success ratio than with rooting dormant cuttings. There may also be something to be learned from grafting notoriously "week rooters" onto more vigorous rootstocks.

Personally, after my first successes last season, I'm hooked on grafting. I'm looking forward to putting some more of my grafting ideas into practice to see how they pan out.

Once I get a little more growth on some of my grafts I'll share some pics here on the forum. 

EDIT:  Sorry nana, I forgot to compliment you on your rooting and grafting successes. Very nice job!

I've been using the cleft/wedge graft as well with good success. 

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Johnparav

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Reply with quote  #9 
Great info and pics Nana .

I have been considering grafting but did not feel confident enough to risk any of my plants . But after seeing your results I will be giving it a try .

Thanks ...... John



nana7b

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Reply with quote  #10 
I think so far my success rate at propagating figs with grafting is greater than rooting cuttings. This is my second year rooting cuttings, first year for grafting.

What I like about grafting;
1. Need a smaller amount of scion wood
2. Water freely
3. Fertilize freely
4. Expose to full sun sooner
5. Faster growth partly due to above reasons.
6. No frustration with mold, checking for roots, rot, transfer ........baby sitting cuttings ....

Only thing is you have to be prepared ahead of time and have many root stock plants with different thicknesses to accommodate scions of different thicknesses.


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TucsonKen

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Reply with quote  #11 
Nana, I've only done a few, but I'm grafting onto branches of larger in-ground plants rather than using individual potted plants as rootsock. It seems to be working well so far, and when they're big enough I'll just air layer them--maybe leaving behind enough of a stub of the grafted variety that I can let it resprout and start over.

Grafts in the photo (from two days ago) are an LSU Improved Celeste (growing even faster than the rooted one-gallon I planted a few weeks earlier) and an LSU Scott's Black (just starting to go). I'm also trying a Black Madeira, which got a little setback from a late frost but is still alive and showing signs that it might start moving as well. The mother BM is small and continues to struggle with FMV and die-back, so I'm hoping the graft will get a big boost from the more vigorous, established rootstock.

Attached Images
jpeg fig_grafts_4-23-2012.jpg (168.81 KB, 95 views)


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nana7b

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Reply with quote  #12 
Ken, your grafts look awesome. Did you bark graft them?

One thing I noticed on mine was that the graft union does not seem as robust as say a pear graft union. Also spring winds have picked up here and I was afraid the scion portion may break off at the graft union. To prevent this I taped a stick as support with the lower portion of the stick taped to the root stock and the other end to the scion wood(used parafilm for this as well) You might want to consider something similar as your graft puts more growth/weight. I will post some pictures this weekend.


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TucsonKen

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Reply with quote  #13 
I'm not very knowledgeable about the various types of grafts, but the tutorial I followed (by Joe Real) referred to the method as "limb bark grafting."

If my UCD cuttings ever arrive, and if any are small enough in diameter to seem suitable, I hope to do some more grafting with this method. Then, if they actually "take" on trees that are already leafed out, I plan to post step-by-step photos.

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Reply with quote  #14 

Thanks for the info and congratulations on your success story. This is very useful to me. My mother-in-law has a tree with great figs, but I have had little luck rooting cuttings. I also happen to have come into posession of several trees of one (unknown) variety that seems to do very well in my neighborhood. It seems like I have some grafting to experiment with in the future. If I can air layer the smaller trunks on some of them and then use the rootstock it is a bonus.


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nana7b

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Reply with quote  #15 
Aaron,

Assuming your MIL can provide you a good number of cutting why not try several different methods to increase your odds of getting at least one plant?

Here are things that come to my mind;

1. Graft
2. Root in moss in a ziplock bag later transfer to cups .... then on to pots
3. Cut the leaves off and stick it in dirt and place in a shady place in the garden
4. Cut the leaves off and place in moss for about a week till the cut wound heals then stick in dirt
5. Cut the leaves off and place cuttings in barely damp paper towel in a ziplock bag and place in the fridge for a week or two( fool it into going dormant) Then try any of the methods above.



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Reply with quote  #16 
Nana,

Her tree provides a LOT of cuttings. It is about 15' tall and a very vigorous grower so it requires serious pruning in the fall so we can get it under the covers! This year I did try the "shotgun" method and I seem to be having success with a few. I hadn't attempted grafting or air layering so those are my next challenges. A couple of family members would really like pieces of this tree to grow in for themselves so I am looking for the most efficient way to supply them all and learn something new along the way.

I'm sure we've all seen those 4-in-1 apple trees around. Has anyone tried something similar with figs? I'm thinking getting a couple of varieties on the same rootstock could be a good space saving tecnique for city gardeners like myself.

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TucsonKen

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Reply with quote  #17 
Aaron, if you're looking for sizable plants, quickly, with guaranteed success, you might consider air layering.

In the very short term, it's not difficult to graft multiple varieties onto a single tree. I don't have any experience with how they would do over the long haul, but given how readily figs respond to pruning, I would think you ought to have no trouble keeping one variety from outgrowing the others.

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Reply with quote  #18 

Thanks Ken. I am planning to try air layering this year also and I have already selected a couple of victims. My brother-in-law tried it two years ago and had gotten some root growth, but I think he lopped it off a little early and it died. I'll try my best to be a little more patient than he was.


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Reply with quote  #19 
Aaron,

Ken had a very good point. Air layering is probably the easiest way to propagate figs. I assumed your MIL did not live near by so did not mention it. If you have access to the trees then I would forget about all other methods and just air layer a few branches. If you have not done it before a little reading may help.

Here are some things you will learn from reading or experience;
1. A wounded or wounded and healed area tends to root better.
2. Not to let the medium go dry
3. Keep the medium shaded if exposed to sun - use foil to shade and reflect heat
4. Provide shade and humidity(plastic tend with some ventilation) when you sever the air layer from the mother plant and plant in a pot. Gradually remove the tent and then gradually acclimate to sun.
5. Limit the number of leaves(You can remove). The small root system will not be able to support all the leaves. You may loose a lot of moisture from too many leaves.


I cannot recall a single fig air layer that failed for me. Also, in my experience air layers seem to root better in the spring time when plants are actively growing. Depending on your climate another advantage to start air layering early in the season is that it is easier to transition it to growing on its own roots when it is not too hot.

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Ruvan
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AaronT

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Reply with quote  #20 

Thanks again. I have been reading a lot about the process in various places, but you seem to have nailed all of the vital points in a concise way that even my addled brain can remember. Luckily my MIL lives only a block from me. Some of the branches are well shaded and will make good candidates. I'm just waiting for the last chance of frost to pass (supposed to dip to 35 tonight) and I think I'll get to it.


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Reply with quote  #21 
All of this info sounds great, and something that I'll have to attempt. The questions I have are can you put cold hardy root stock grafted with something that's sensitive to the cold? Or would the graft die as soon as it freezes? Would a type that has problems surviving because of fmv, maybe more suited on a healthy root stock?



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Reply with quote  #22 
I'm not an expert--hopefully others will chime in with information based on actual experience rather than just putting 2 and 2 together, but I believe a cold-sensitive variety grafted onto cold-hardy rootstock would be just as severely damaged by the cold as it would be if it were growing on its very own roots.

As far as FMV, I'm still guessing, but I think there's some likelihood that grafting might cause an improvement, which is why I grafted a wimpy little Black Madeira twig onto a healthy UCR135-15s. Here's my line of thought: Many figs with FMV seem to outgrow the symptoms to some degree as the tree matures. Grafting an FMV-prone cutting onto a vigorous, well-established rootstock seems likely to give some of the same advantages, over a shorter length of time, as waiting for the tree to outgrow FMV symptoms on its own. I would assume grafting onto an FMV resistant rootstock could only help as well.

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Reply with quote  #23 
Here are a couple of pictures of the support sticks I attached to prevent breakage at the graft union. Spring time winds have picked up around here the last week or so. There is also a close up picture of the graft union.

Attached Images
jpeg graft_union.jpg (268.37 KB, 89 views)
jpeg graft_support.jpg (184.62 KB, 102 views)
jpeg grafts_04282012.jpg (320.03 KB, 96 views)


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Ruvan
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Reply with quote  #24 

Quote:
Originally Posted by TucsonKen
I'm not an expert--hopefully others will chime in with information based on actual experience rather than just putting 2 and 2 together, but I believe a cold-sensitive variety grafted onto cold-hardy rootstock would be just as severely damaged by the cold as it would be if it were growing on its very own roots.

I believe that if you grafted a cold sensitive scion unto a very vigorus very cold hardy tree the graft would freeze and die the first winter. IMHO

It would be nice if I'm wrong!

 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TucsonKen
As far as FMV, I'm still guessing, but I think there's some likelihood that grafting might cause an improvement, which is why I grafted a wimpy little Black Madeira twig onto a healthy UCR135-15s. Here's my line of thought: Many figs with FMV seem to outgrow the symptoms to some degree as the tree matures. Grafting an FMV-prone cutting onto a vigorous, well-established rootstock seems likely to give some of the same advantages, over a shorter length of time, as waiting for the tree to outgrow FMV symptoms on its own. I would assume grafting onto an FMV resistant rootstock could only help as well.

Some where I've read that the virus takes some time to infect new growth. Maybe if you bud grafted unto a vigorous non infected tree you might be able to get rid of FMV.


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Reply with quote  #25 
Here are a couple more that I grafted. These cuttings were received later and grafted later than the ones I posted earlier. Also I ran out of potted rootstock so I  grafted them onto an in-ground tree.

Initially when I grafted them the rootstock tree was just leafing out. After a couple of weeks the canopy totally shaded the grafts. I was concerned that the lack of light might affect the graft so decided to air-layer them at the same time. I started with 3 grafts but one failed.

Yesterday I removed them and potted up earlier than I had planned(the roots showed up pretty fast). Now I will keep my fingers crossed!

Aaron, I added a couple of picture on how I handle the air-layers.

Attached Images
jpeg GraftPlusAirLayer1.jpg (374.35 KB, 102 views)
jpeg GraftPlusAirLayer2.jpg (327.55 KB, 122 views)
jpeg GraftPlusAirLayer3.jpg (164.32 KB, 83 views)
jpeg GraftPlusAirLayer4.jpg (259.04 KB, 69 views)
jpeg GraftPlusAirLayer5.jpg (95.24 KB, 57 views)


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Ruvan
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nana7b

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Reply with quote  #26 
An update ....

The supports I added for the grafted plants were not quite adequate. The winds last week snapped one of my grafts. This particular graft was somewhat weak. I don't know if it was the technique or the variety involved. It was growing really well but the graft union was weak. This was a Mission fig. The others have good graft unions.

To fix the problem I placed taller bamboo supports on all my grafted plants. The one that snapped is still doing fine. It is connected to the rootstock by a very thin section. I went ahead and air-layered it.

The pictures are of the one that snapped, the snapped graft union and one of the others that had a nice graft union.

Attached Images
jpeg graft_support_strong.jpg (104.71 KB, 84 views)
jpeg graft_cracked.jpg (102.25 KB, 77 views)
jpeg graft_good_looking.jpg (49.51 KB, 72 views)


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Reply with quote  #27 
Too bad it snapped, but the air layer was a nice way to salvage the situation.
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Reply with quote  #28 
An update ....

The grafts are still doing well. Growth compared to the rooted cuttings is quite good. All four grafts have put out multiple fruits. I have air layered two of them one of which is ready for removal.

Had to up-pot all of them due to growth. The smaller pots in front are the rooted cuttings.

Attached Images
jpeg MBVS_and_MegaCeleste.jpg (195.16 KB, 97 views)
jpeg Hunt_and_MissionNL.jpg (222.45 KB, 71 views)


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JD

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Reply with quote  #29 
Nana,
This is a very nice discourse.

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Reply with quote  #30 
Great topic! Very interesting,Nana. Thanks
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Reply with quote  #31 
Great looking plants! Thanks for the update.
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Reply with quote  #32 
very interesting. thank you so much for the updates
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Reply with quote  #33 

Thanks for the updates. Nice work and well-presented.

 

I see some grafting in my future. I've had success with grafts on peaches and nectarines, but havent tried anything else yet.

 

This is my first year rooting figs and now I know what I'm going to do with some of the less desireable or unknown varieties I've rooted, are doing well, but didn't have much of a future (I didn't want to take the time, space, and supplies to grow them up). They are now going to be rootstock for next years cuttings. :)  And then perhaps some air-layering since it can be extremely windy here.


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nana7b

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Reply with quote  #34 
I had the first ripe fruit from a grafted tree yesterday. While all 4 fruited the Marseilles Black VS was the first to ripen. I think I could have picked it a day sooner, but it was very good. Beats the best Celeste I have had. It was jammy and flavorful, sweet but not overly so. I can't wait for this one to get better with age. Also, MBVS seems to take the heat really well. We have had a few consecutive days where the temps were around 105F and MBVS did not show the slightest distress.

It took less than 5 months from cutting to ripe fruit on this graft! I am looking forward to trying the rest of the fruits on this plant!

Attached Images
jpeg MSVS_FirstFruit.jpg (196.05 KB, 61 views)
jpeg MSVS_Ripe1.jpg (154.74 KB, 48 views)
jpeg MSVS_RipeSplit1.jpg (225.63 KB, 57 views)


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Ruvan
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Reply with quote  #35 
That's impressive--congratulations! Only one of my grafts (LSU Improved
Celeste) is growing fruit; most of the others are showing little progress. There's usually a big growth spurt once the monsoon rains get under way, so I'm keeping my fingers crossed that the grafts will take off then, too.

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Ken
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Reply with quote  #36 
Such a nice looking dark type and thanks for sharing that picture.
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Reply with quote  #37 
Really amazing work, thank you so much for showing us. My hands are full now, but will follow your steps at the proper time when I attempt this. Nana, please keep us updated on your work.


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Reply with quote  #38 
Ken, I think the key was starting early. I grafted them around the first week of Feb. Then by mid to late March they were outside and had a good 2+ months to grow well in warm but not hot temperatures. I did give them a daily dose of dilute MG and pinched them to make branches. Now it is very hot and nothing is really putting much leaf growth, but they are pushing little fruits. Hopefully your monsoon season will kick them into high gear. Rain water does wonders for plants. In fact I watered them exclusively with collected rainwater in the spring.

Martin and Luke, you are welcome. These are some of my first black figs and I am really liking the look and taste. In the fall I will try to sum up my learnings.

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Ruvan
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Reply with quote  #39 
Ruvan,

Can you give any advice as to the timing of grafts that worked best? I'm wondering whether to do it when the plant is fully dormant (no sap flowing), or when the sap begins to flow prior to budbreak. These are fantastic results and I'd like to try this next winter indoors with some cuttings. I've never tried grafting before but am encouraged after your experiences.

Tim

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Reply with quote  #40 
Tim,

I just started grafting figs early this year. The first week of February to be exact.

I had the root stock plants in a dormant state in the unheated garage.
As I ordered the cuttings I brought them inside the house and left them near a sunny window to 'wake' them up. Upon receiving the cuttings I grafted them. I didn't think grafting in a dormant state would work. I had grafted pear and jujube in prior years as they broke dormancy and that worked really well.

You should definitely try grafting. It is quite rewarding and your chances of raising a good sized plant by fall is greatly increased. Frankly I don't think I will root fig cuttings anymore. It is too much work in my opinion. Of course to graft you have to be ready with root stock plants. There is some upfront preparation but then it is pretty easy.

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Reply with quote  #41 
Please Please Please do ,not graft UCD Scion on established older cultivars that are healthy,because they will decay,and become ill to never again produce a large harvest,because the scion infects the healthy tree forever.
Grafting is the worse thing you can do to a healthy tree.
nana7b

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Reply with quote  #42 
Herman, you are right  - grafting onto tree growing in ground or one that you intend to keep healthy is a gamble - UCD or not. It is like taking a blood transfusion without proper screening. Thank you for pointing that out.

What I propose is to use cutting grown plants to use as root stock solely for the purpose of propagation. In my case I used Celeste as the root stock. In the end I do plan to have everything growing on their own roots by air layering.


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Ruvan
North Texas

Looking for: Black Madeira
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Reply with quote  #43 
That is also my plan for Black Ishcia, I have a fairly healthy tree that is hardy here, very vigorous but the fruit has an open eye which will mold too easily when it ripens here so I am planning to take a couple air layers or just buy a couple plants of the same variety and graft the black ischia onto it next year (assuming I get the cuttings) and see if it will improve the vigour of the black ishcia enough to grow where I can take an air layer from and maybe keep one grafted to see if it helps, assuming the grafts would take. 
On the other hand I am feeling kind of lazy and would rather get healthy black ischia cuttings, I have lots of virus as it is and some how I think that even if the graft takes on the Black Ischia, that it may fail soon after based on numerous peoples attempts.

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pitangadiego

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Reply with quote  #44 
Grafting gives you more growth and bigger tree faster, essentially because you did the hard work the previous year. You already grew the roots, and now it is time to use them. Cuttings need to go through the rooting process in the current season.

I am contemplating chopping off some tall skinny plants, and letting them reflush with growth this season, with the hope that I would have 2-4 good branches for grafting onto next spring, to make 2- 3- and 4-in one trees.

One note, gfrafting will be most successful if the rootstock has already begun to break dormancy. With the sap already rising in the tree, it increases the quickness and successfulness with which the graft point heals together. If the roots are dormant, the graft will need to wait heal  until the sap does flow.

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TucsonKen

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Reply with quote  #45 
Ruvan, the monsoon has spurred growth in all of my "stagnant" grafts except Black Madeira, so I expect a decent size increase by the end of the season. However, I probably won't have time to air layer them this year as I had planned, so I'll have to protect the grafts this winter.
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Ken
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Reply with quote  #46 
Quote:
I am contemplating chopping off some tall skinny plants, and letting them reflush with growth this season, with the hope that I would have 2-4 good branches for grafting onto next spring, to make 2- 3- and 4-in one trees.



Good idea. I've got some unknowns I don't much care about that I was planning on using for grafts next year. Might pinch those to get some additional side branches growing to size now.

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nana7b

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Reply with quote  #47 
Jon, I think you described the condition very well. Also, the fact that you can fertilize the grafted ones a little more aggressively than rooted cuttings helps increase size by end of season,

Ken, sorry to hear BM is slow going. I was hoping it would take off too. If I am not mistaken BM is a slow grower and somewhat dwarfed. I think Dennis posted a picture of the UCD tree which was small. I was thinking perhaps a vigorous rootstock will help a slow growing scion(Using the same logic as a dwarfing rootstock slowing growth on the scion of a otherwise faster growing plant).  Perhaps the reverse is not true. Anyone else have any experience in this area?

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Ruvan
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Looking for: Black Madeira
nana7b

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Reply with quote  #48 
The next grafted plant to ripen fruit was Mega Celeste. I posted some pictures of the fruit here;

http://figs4funforum.websitetoolbox.com/post/Mega-Celeste-a-winner-2910067

This one fruited in under 6 months after grafting. About 4 fruit on this plant dropped several weeks ago. I decided to remove all of the rest but two to give them a chance to ripen. Sure enough one started swelling and ripening.

Yet to fruit .....Hunt and Mission NL. I removed some fruit from Hunt as some of its fruit dropped too.

In the attached picture the plant to the left is the rooted cutting while the one to the right is the grafted one.

Attached Images
jpeg MegaCelesteCuttingGrownAndGrafted1.jpg (292.95 KB, 41 views)


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Ruvan
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