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ross

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Reply with quote  #1 
Thought I'd share my thoughts on some of my trees with you guys. Enjoy!




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Ross - Zone 6B/7A - Philadelphia
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lobboroz

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Reply with quote  #2 
Great videos again Ross.

If you guys haven't checked Ross's videos you should. Informative and well made. Also a great guy who would take the time to reply to questions in the comment sections. Used to annoy him with a few q's before he let me know about the fig forums lol

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My varieties:
St Dominic Violette, Desert King and a heap of unknowns...

Location: Melbourne, Australia
blindesign

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Reply with quote  #3 
Another great set of videos.  Always enjoyable to watch.  Thanks, Ross!  I'm looking forward to all your fig review videos this season.
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Jennifer
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Wish List: Violeta, Black Ischia, Bordissot Negra Rimada
Growing: Too many
angelad

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Reply with quote  #4 
Thank you Ross.  I also enjoy watching your videos.
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Angela (Southern Ontario zone 6a
wishlist: I-258, Black Madeira, Florea. Brooklyn White.Kathleen Black, Smith, Improved Celeste
ross

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Reply with quote  #5 
Thanks for the support everyone.

I wanted to add that in the 2nd video.. Raspberry Latte is a seedling from Jon's orchard, so when I was talking about different sources may or may not have the Dall'Oso mutations.. there's your answer. They all should and it's all ONE source. I also want to mention that people have had pretty bad luck with getting this one to fruit. Even when I received the plant from kk, it seemed very precocious. Fruits formed last year (a bit too late), and are forming now on just about every node.

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Ross - Zone 6B/7A - Philadelphia
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Sas

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Reply with quote  #6 
It appears to me that sun and heat could help cure signs of FMV.
My black Madeira (UCD) grew new branches from beneath the soil for the second season in a row and those leaves appear to have shaken off FM in a major way.
Not sure if this works also in your cooler climate.
Very nice videos. Thank You for posting.








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Sas from North Austin TX Zone 8B

ross

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Reply with quote  #7 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sas
It appears to me that sun and heat could help cure signs of FMV. My black Madeira (UCD) grew new branches from beneath the soil for the second season in a row and those leaves appear to have shaken off FM in a major way. Not sure if this works also in your cooler climate. Very nice videos. Thank You for posting.


I agree Sas. Usually suckers are healthy.

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Ross - Zone 6B/7A - Philadelphia
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ross

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Reply with quote  #8 
Thought I'd just reuse this thread to post another one of my videos. This one I think you guys will really love:


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Ross - Zone 6B/7A - Philadelphia
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Sas

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Reply with quote  #9 
Thank You for bringing to my attention that mulch messes with your soil. I usually use it on top, but wasn't aware that it could harm. I will probably start to replace it with a layer of granular limestone as I saw in this classic video. Thanks to Peter for mentioning in one of your videos.

http://www.marthastewart.com/907952/fabulous-figs

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Sas from North Austin TX Zone 8B

ross

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Reply with quote  #10 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sas
Thank You for bringing to my attention that mulch messes with your soil. I usually use it on top, but wasn't aware that it could harm. I will probably start to replace it with a layer of granular limestone as I saw in this classic video. Thanks to Peter for mentioning in one of your videos. http://www.marthastewart.com/907952/fabulous-figs


Sas, it only hogs nitrogen if it's mixed in. Mulch should always be used on top and is an absolute necessity. The limestone the DiPaolo brothers mention I've already tried. I even made a video on it. Unless you can get some really high quality lime, it's actually a negative because most lime will change the ph too much and too quickly. 

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Ross - Zone 6B/7A - Philadelphia
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lobboroz

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Reply with quote  #11 
hi Ross
Ive seen alot of your videos and i can see that you also use those cloth/felt pots as well. Can you share with us your experiences with them? do trees grow better? bigger? 
i was thinking of getting the huge 30gallon ones. Not for figs though but for my avocado and cherry tree. Was also thinking of turning it into a SIP as well like Rob did in the below video:




also in regards to mulch mixed in the issue doesnt seem to be straightforward? there seems to be discussion on this matter and benefits in using wood mulch mixed in

https://permaculturenews.org/forums/index.php?threads/do-wood-chips-really-take-nitrogen-from-the-soil.15417/

No disrespect to Ross, im not disregarding what Ross has said just bring it up for discussion and other peoples experiences. 

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My varieties:
St Dominic Violette, Desert King and a heap of unknowns...

Location: Melbourne, Australia
ross

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Reply with quote  #12 
@lobboroz

The fabric pots are fantastic. Mainly because I don't need to root prune every 2-3 years like those using plastic pots. Instead.. my labor is instead when the bag breaks.

As for the mulch robbing nitrogen, mulch is normally found in nature on the top of the soil. This is totally fine and recommended. Mixed into the soil is a problem and I'm not seeing that guys point. 

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Ross - Zone 6B/7A - Philadelphia
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