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Grasa

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Reply with quote  #1 

My attempt to multiply this special fig! 

Into their sweat chamber they went for more rooting.

Attached Images
jpeg 5_cuttings.JPG (919.41 KB, 82 views)
jpeg CIMG9529.JPG (927.18 KB, 136 views)
jpeg CIMG9499.JPG (874.11 KB, 85 views)
jpeg graft_2.JPG (481.61 KB, 71 views)
jpeg Graft_4.JPG (527.63 KB, 80 views)
jpeg Graft_1.JPG (796.98 KB, 71 views)
jpeg graft_5.JPG (571.84 KB, 58 views)
jpeg Graft_2_wraped_&_3_.JPG (673.14 KB, 82 views)


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Grasa
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MichaelTucson

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Reply with quote  #2 
Interesting technique Grasa, doing those grafts at the same time as rooting the root stock.  How has your success with that technique been?

Mike   central NY state, zone 5

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MichaelTucson

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Reply with quote  #3 
Oh, and what are the tops and the root stock you're using?
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Grasa

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Reply with quote  #4 
The tops are special fig I received from in the mail! the bottom were from a tree I found on 97th, not too far from me, so I know it grows well here. the owner told me to help myself, so I cut all the branches that were falling on the other side of the fence, cut them and have them rooting in various sizes and stages of rooting.  I used various methods, of joining the bottom and the top.   I do not know how this will do, that is why I left 3 in their original sizes, if my grafts go wrong, I can count on the un-altered cuttings, although I stole a bud of a lower portion of the cutting and used as a graft , the removed 'hole' was brushed with hormone, so it should root in that place.     I will update is something develops.
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Grasa
Seattle, WA
garden_whisperer

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Reply with quote  #5 
Looking forward to seeing more. I graft fruit trees but never thought about doing a fig.
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Dave Zone 6b Illinois

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Reply with quote  #6 
Grasa, I like your style. I promised myself that I would start grafting next year. I got the tools, now I need to start planning on which ones to try. I got some large Brown Turkey trees and may end up using them. Grafting cuttings on cuttings is something I never thought of. I'm curious how your test will turn out. Good luck and post resuts.

cheers,

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Dennis
Charlotte, North Carolina/Zone 8a 

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Reply with quote  #7 
Interesting. I wish you success, but I will be a little surprised if the graft takes on a un-rooted cutting, seems to go against my general thoughts on grafts, but I guess a graft union taking might not be that different than callusing. That's makes this fun trying different approaches, be sure and  report back. If successful will  you then airlayer to get on it’s own roots?
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Phil N.GA. Zone 7 Looking for: Bordissot Negra Rimada,  Del La Senyora,  LUV, Peloponisiaka aspra sika, Paratjal Rimada, Sangue Dulce, and on and on
Grasa

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Reply with quote  #8 
I thought of the same, and to satisfy my curiosity, I opened one  and to my surprise, it was pretty glued together already in just  a few days, it was very sealed and I had to prop it up to take them apart. It would be fun to see if they all make, I will have 9 trees to share.
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Grasa
Seattle, WA
jenniferarino83

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Reply with quote  #9 
I have doubts, seeing that most grafting techniques usually stay away from moisture. But I could be wrong. I will be surprised if it does work. Keep us posted.

Best of luck

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Jennifer A. Brown 
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Rewton

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Reply with quote  #10 
Grasa, any updates on how these grafts are going?  I may try this also if you have success.

Cheers!

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Steve MD zone 7a

Grasa

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Reply with quote  #11 

Some are doing nothing, others are trying... to early to tell  (one for sure is being a real fighter) will take some pics


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Grasa
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Bass

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Reply with quote  #12 
Grafting is more successful in spring and budding in summer.
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HarveyC

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Reply with quote  #13 
With a controlled environment grafting can be done anytime of year.  Even outdoors I graft February into October.  The mostly likely graft to fail is the one that isn't attempted. :)
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Harvey - Correia Farms
Isleton, CA (Sacramento County) USDA zone 9b, Sunset zone 14

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Grasa

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Reply with quote  #14 
Bass, you say Spring because that is when the plant is growing, right? But indoors, they are growing, so they do not know when Spring is, or do they? 
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Grasa
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Grasa

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Reply with quote  #15 
Well Harvey, I am not sure this is not a fail... I am still figuring out what is the tip of a cutting, and since my root stock was a branch that was rooting under a black berry bush, I really could not tell what was tip or bottom. Upon called the attention, I reinspect my cuttings and found this one on 'upsidedown' root stock,oops, it had already glued itself to the root stock so I just cut it and layed it down on top of the soil... it is trying to grow - there is a tiny green to it. crossed fingers, as this will be a miracle if survives.   It is nothing but the budding.  

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jpeg Inverted_F._Preto.JPG (163.59 KB, 50 views)


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Grasa
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HarveyC

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Reply with quote  #16 
Grasa, it may fail but if you wouldn't have tried it was never going to grow.  I've never done it myself, but grafting a scion upside down is sometimes done on purpose to dwarf a plant.

It got down to 34F here last night but my greenhouse stayed above 50F so I may move in more plants into my greenhouse and graft them to some of my recent acquisitions.

The only suggestion I'd make is to use a sharp knife to make good smooth cuts and to wrap your grafts with Parafilm to prevent dessication and disease.

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Harvey - Correia Farms
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MichaelTucson

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Reply with quote  #17 
I am confused about one thing Grasa.  Other than satisfying curiosity, what is your goal in trying to do the graft and the rooting of the root stock at the same time?  I mean, you know you can do those steps serially... what goal do you have in mind to do them at the same time?

Mike

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Grasa

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Reply with quote  #18 
Mike, first of all I wanted to learn how to skillful do the cuts and learn the process as I plan to  make my huge 22 y.o tree into many varieties, and I don't want to learn in the tree and mess it up.  

Secondly, I want to maximize the wonderful gift I received from many generous members of this forum.

Thirdly, my city plot is rather small and I have other plants, and chickens roaming all over,

and finally, there are very few varieties that can stand the rainy (soggy) and cold weather of Seattle. The cuttings I used as root stalk are from my 22 y.o. tree that grows well, and from other local sources, where I saw and obtained cuttings from the trees - thus if the graft works, and some of them are working (so far) it would eliminate the grownd growth issues that many of these varieties have. Because even if planted in pots, they will be rained and soggy out there. 

It is all a learning experience and I am sharing my results, that is all
here are some of the updated pics of Figo Preto and Black Greek.

Using home made stuff, no fancy graft tape, wax, tools.... here I used rubber bands, strips of compostable garbage bag (green plastic) and put them inside of the plastic tub that comes with salad greens to keep them moist while they begin to grow.  At this stage, the bottom cutting already have good callous and are ready to send out roots- both of them are growing.

Attached Images
jpeg FP_graft_update_2.JPG (362.27 KB, 34 views)
jpeg FP_graft_update_4_in_plastic_tub.JPG (831.21 KB, 45 views)
jpeg FP_graft_update_1.JPG (377.84 KB, 36 views)
jpeg BGreek_graft_updade_(back).JPG (542.21 KB, 37 views)
jpeg BGreek_graft_update(front).JPG (698.17 KB, 42 views)
jpeg FP_graft_update_3.JPG (316.63 KB, 34 views)


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Grasa
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MichaelTucson

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Reply with quote  #19 
Thanks Grasa.  FWIW, I hope you didn't think I was picking on you or something.  I just didn't understand why do that simultaneously, rather than serially.  Thanks for sharing your ideas.

Mike

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Grasa

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Reply with quote  #20 
Michael, the lower cutting (root stock) was about one month older in the rooting process, some had roots already, others callous, after I joined them, I let them together in the rooting box (covered with newspaper with little moist... so their roots took a little longer to sprout, but they became stronger and waiting for the top to stick together, I hope that is what they were doing... I still have a couple not ready for the cup, and I send off a few to others, one determined to be a bad graft, it was taken apart and became 2!  It is a lesson that has engaged a lot of very wise members to teach me what I need to learn!  I am new at multiple figs and have about destroyed my 22 y.o. fig tree with bad pruning in the past years...so, I am revamping it to make up for my wrongs over the years. Please feel free to tell me your thoughts and opinions. I need them all. '
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Grasa
Seattle, WA
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