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pitangadiego

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Reply with quote  #1 

It is almost time to add a FAQ section to Figs 4 Fun. Does anybody have suggestions for questions/information that should be included? List of vocabulary that needs definition?


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Reply with quote  #2 
I think some commonly discussed issues are:

Fertilization of figs 1) in ground and 2) in containers

Watering of figs 1) in ground 2) in containers

Pruning of figs (both tops and roots)

Breba vs main crop

Propagation of figs

Overwintering of figs

Harvesting of figs (when are they ripe, etc.)

Nematodes

Maybe some fig recipes?  We could even have a fig recipe section and you could ask everyone to submit their favorite recipe using figs

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Reply with quote  #3 
Good ideas! Don't forget a FAQ about FMV, maybe group with nematodes and other fig diseases and parasites?

I have tons of fig recipes culled from the internet. :-) Can't wait to try them!

Sue

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Reply with quote  #4 
Labeling and/or mapping varieties.
I lost one label in a large storm this year and had been fortunate to have been given the advice of mapping (which I had done a mere two weeks before the storm)- great advice!
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Reply with quote  #5 
Wow!  That would be enough information for an entire book!
 
I would like to see a "What is wrong with my fig?" section with photos that show the problems that fig owners encounter, and the solutions to fix them.
 
Another section on how to protect the fruit from birds and bugs etc. would be nice.  There must be a variety of innovations out there that people use to protect the fruit.

Something about identification (or the difficulties of), and genetics would be cool.
 
A Vocab page would be awesome.


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Reply with quote  #6 
Jon,
 
How about something on propagating green cuttings!
 
Keep up the GReat work.
 
Cecil
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Reply with quote  #7 
Whatever happened to the suggestion of a FAQ?
    If one in progress, another three issues - 1) ant control, 2) sucker control and number of stems/trunks for best yield, and 3) thinning flower "fruit" for better, earlier yield where frost is a problem.
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Reply with quote  #8 
Regions.  I live and florida and about 1/3 of what you guys preach is out the window down here.  Regional differences...

What varities can grow where and how well do they do in each place. 

I think if you do this FAQ correct you are going to put Ray Givan's book sales in the toilet.

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Reply with quote  #9 
I would also add (Where to buy a fig tree)

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Reply with quote  #10 
A glossary.  I just found out there is a difference between cracking and splitting.  A glossary would help, do not know if its been mentioned yet.

-Bill

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pitangadiego

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Reply with quote  #11 
Well, it is three years since I had hoped to get started on this. Below is a beginning and a framework. Hopefully forum members can take one or more of these items and write a definition which can be added. if you have a good picture which illustrates one of these items, please send it to me: minimum size 800 x 600. When this gets further along, I will find a place for it at the Figs 4 Fun website and get it linked here at the Forum. Some of these subjects have been covered in the "Growing Tips" Link, so they can be inserted into this project fairly easily.

This has not been edited or proof-read. That comes later.

FAQ  and FIG GLOSSARY

 

Air-Layering

 

            [...]

 

            http://figs4fun.com/More_Info_Air_Layering.html

 

Ants

 

For trees that do not contact other trees or objects, and that have branches pruned so that no foliage touches the ground, ants can be controlled with Tree Tanglefoot - a sticky, non-drying product that, when applied around the trunk, creates an impassable barrier for ants and other climbing insects. Do not apply directly to the bark. First wrap with a non-porous material (plastic or ?), and apply Tanglefoot to that material. Check frequently for bridging materials (leaves, dead bugs, dust, dirt, etc.) and rough up the surface to expose fresh material. It needs to be re-applied every so often.

 

After applying the Tanglefoot barrier the t\ree can be hosed with water to remove insects.

 

For more information see:

 http://contech-inc.com/customerservice/productsupport/treetanglefoot/faq/#4

 

Spraying Malathion or other insecticides on tree trunks can create a temporary barrier to many ants, as long as they do not have an alternative route up into the tree.

 

Birds

 

Birds are a large problem. Reflective tapes, CDs, rubber snakes, plastic owls, and other devices may have a very brief deterrent effect on some birds, but the only truly effective bird barrier is screen or netting with openings small enough to prevent the smallest fruit-eating species in your area from squeezing through. Netting with a cell size of ½” x ½” is small enough to stop all birds

 

Birdnet

 

The only truly effective bird barrier is screen or netting with openings small enough to prevent the smallest fruit-eating species in your area from squeezing through. Netting with a cell size of ½” x ½” is small enough to stop all birds. This will also stop many fig beetles, but a smaller opening size is required to keep all beetles out. The netting must cover 100% of the tree, by being bunched and tied around the trunk, and making contact with the ground around the entire circumference. Unless properly applied, plastic bird netting is frequently a death trap for birds, lizards, and snakes. The most effective application is to drape the netting over some type of frame that holds the mesh away from figs and foliage, and keeps it taut enough to prevent birds from becoming entangled. Roll up any areas of excess netting, such as at corners, and secure it with twist ties or clothes pins. Bring the netting straight down to the ground and stake or weight it rather than gathering it around the trunk. If lizards or snakes occur in your area, encircling the tree with a low fence of plastic sheeting will prevent them from getting trapped in the mesh, as long as the netting overlaps the top of the plastic fence far enough to exclude birds, but remains well clear of the ground. Frames can be made of PVC pipe and fittings, or poles and string/wire, and can enclose a single tree or multiple trees. For individual trees, harvesting can be accomplished by raising the netting high enough to reach underneath and access the fruit. For larger enclosures, a permanent doorway can be built to allow full access to all of the trees inside.

 

http://figs4fun.com/More_Info_Bird.html

 

http://figs4fun.com/fpix/FP992-48.jpg

Breba

 

Fruit produced on wood which grew in the previous season.  Also called “profichi” in Italian. Also known as the Spring crop.

 


http://figs4fun.com/fpix/FP538-13.jpg



http://figs4fun.com/fpix/FP989-71.jpg

 

Caprifig

 

Functionally male fig or synconia, which produces pollen necessary for pollenating Smyrna type figs and the second or main crop of San Pedro typ figs. They also contain short-styles female flowers, which, when pollenated, produce a sort of pseudo-flesh.

 

Common type

 

One of 4 types of Ficus carica which comprises the majority of figs which the home gardener encounters. Well known examples are Black Mission, Brown Turkey, Celeste, Kadota and White Genoa.

 

Condit, Ira J.

 

Fig breeder, who wsas responsible for a breeding program at the University of California, in the 1950s (?). The goal of the program was to develop a common fig which would have all the characteristics of the smyrna-type fig, Calimyrna.

 

Among his written articles and books, the most often cited is The Fig. See http://chla.library.cornell.edu/cgi/t/text/text-idx?c=chla;cc=chla;sid=28cfe61701c1cc4dd90d19d3aa0fdc33;rgn=main;view=text;idno=3116126

 

Containers

 

            [...]

 

            http://figs4fun.com/fpix/FP813-02.jpg

 

            See http://figs4fun.com/bills_figs.html

 

Cracking

 

            [...]

 

Cutting

 

            [...]

 

http://figs4fun.com/fpix/FP972-25.jpg

 

Die Back

 

            [...]

 

Diseases

 

            [...]

 

            See Rust

 

DNA

 

            [...]

 

Dried Fruit Beetle (Carpophilus hemipterus & other closely-related species)

 

Figs that have an open ostiole, or eye, are susceptible to damage from this tiny beetle. Driedfruit beetles enter the fig through the ostiole and introduce yeasts and other microorganisms that cause severe souring and rapid deterioration of the fruit. In regions where this pest is found, the best way to avoid souring is to grow only closed-eye varieties.

 

For recommendations, see http://figs4funforum.websitetoolbox.com/post?id=4652491

 

Drying

 

Small figs can be dried whole, but large varieties may need to be cut in pieces to prevent spoilage during the drying process. In warm areas with low humidity, some figs can be dried outdoors in the sun if protected from birds and insects. Electric fruit dryers do an excellent job as well, but vary widely in their quality and in the amount of fruit that can be dried at one time. The best varieties offer multiple drying racks and fan-driven air circulation for uniform heat distribution and moisture removal.

 

Dormant wood

 

This term generally refers to branches or cutting which are no longer actively growing, and shed their leaves, usually during the fall, in preparation for winter. Dormant wood is generally brown in color, indicating a change in the composition of the cells ina process known as lignification.

 

            See Lignification

 

Eye

 

            See Ostiole

 

Fertilizer

 

            [...]

 

Fig Beetle, Cotinis mutabilis

 

            Also known as the Western Green June Beetle.

 

These large scarab beetles can decimate figs and other crops in the southwestern USA and northern Mexico. They often feed in groups, clustered tightly around a fig as they devour it. Adults are active during the day and can be stopped with ¼” x ¼” plastic netting, but the more common ½” x ½” size allows many of them to pass right through. They lay their eggs in leaf litter beneath the tree, producing large white grubs that feed on decaying matter and tree roots.

 


http://figs4fun.com/fpix/FP999-66.jpg

 

            See, also Dried Fruit Beetle

 

Fig Mosaic Virus

 

A virus that infects fig tree and plants. It is considered ubiquitous worldwide by the USDA. Infected plants may or may not show any symptoms. Most obvious symptoms are patterns and patches of discoloration on the leaves, distorted leaves, and poorly growing branches or plants. Distortedd leaves seem to be more pronounced when the weather is cool and damp, which is more common in the Spring and Fall.

 

Flower

 

            [...]

 

FMV

 

            See Fig Mosaic Virus

 

Frost

 

            [...]

 

Fruit

 

            [...]

 

Fruit drop

 

            [...]

 

Gall Flower

 

            [...]

 

Grafting

 

            [...]

 

            http://figs4fun.com/More_Info_Grafting.html

 

Green wood

 

            [...]

 

Harvesting

 

            [...]

 

            http://figs4fun.com/basics_Harvest.html

 

Insects

 

            [...] Stink Bugs, White Fly

 

See also Fig Beetle

 

See also Dried Fruit Beetle

 

Irrigation

 

            [...]

 

Lignification

 

Lignification is the plant cell wall process by which the lignin polymers that hold the fibers together are produced. Lignins add structural rigidity to the cell wall, aid in water transport up the plant stem, and function in defense against various pathogens. The current theory, based on that developed some 50 years ago, holds that the polymerization process is under simple chemical control. That is, unlike the synthesis of proteins and carbohydrates, for example, enzymes or proteins are not directly involved in preparing the polymer. The theory continues to accommodate all of the currently known facts.

 

http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publications.htm?seq_no_115=202132

 

 

 

Long-styled Female Flowers

 

            Found in female common figs.

 

Main Crop

 

Fruit produced on current season’s wood. Also known as the Summer crop, or Mammoni in Italian.

 

Mamme

           

            Italian for the third or Winter crop.

 

Mammoni

           

            Fruit produced on current season’s wood. Also known as the Summer crop.

 

Mold

 

            [...]

 

            http://figs4fun.com/More_Info_Humidity.html

 

Nematodes

 

            [...]

 

            See Root Knot Nematodes

 

Ostiole

 

            [...]

 

            http://figs4fun.com/fpix/FP948-85.jpg

 

Pests

 

            [...]  Rabbits, Voles, Mice, Rats, Deer, Foxes, Gophers, other

 

Pinching

 

            [...]

 

Profichi

 

Fruit produced on wood which grew in the previous season.  Also called “breba” or the Spring crop.

 

Propagation

 

            [...]

 

            http://figs4fun.com/basics_Propagating.html

 

Pruning

 

            [...]

 

            http://figs4fun.com/basics_Pruning.html

 

Ripeness

 

            [...]

 

            http://figs4fun.com/basics_Harvest.html

 

Root Knot Nematodes

 

            [...]

 

http://figs4fun.com/fpix/FP972-28.jpg

 

Rooting

 

            [...]

 

http://figs4fun.com/basics_Rooting.html

 

Rust

 

            [...]

 

San Pedro type

 

A category of figs which set a breba crop with out pollenation, like a common fig, but require pollination for the main crop figs to persist, like a Smyrna type fig. Examples include Desert King, White King, and Dauphine.

 

            A specific variety of fig fromj which the San Pedro category derives its name.

 

Seeds / Seedlings

 

Viable seeds are sedxually prfoduced by pollenation of a female fig and pollen from a caprifig. Because they are sexually produced, they contain genetic material ffrom both their male and female parents, and will not produce a plant that is

 

The best example of this variability in the USDA collection at UC Davis’s Wolfskill Experimental Orchard is DFIC0164.1 through DFIC0164.9 which were grown from seed obtained from Croatia (?). The other example in the USDA collection is DFIC0260 Encanto which is a seedling of Vista Black Mission, produced and selected at Encanto Farms Nursery approximately 2001.

 

One half of seedlings will be caprifigs, functionally male and not suitable for eating. The balance will be edible, but the fruit may not be palatable, or, in some cases, not produced at all, or after a long period of juvenility. For these reasons, apart from specific breeding programs, seeds are seldom (if ever) used as a source of fig trees for home or commercial orchard use.

 

http://figs4fun.com/fpix/FP518-16.jpg

 

Short-styled Female flowers

 

            Found [only?] in caprifgs.

 

            See also caprifig.

 

Smyrna type

 

A category of figs which requires pollenation to set the main crop. [Smyrna types only main-crop figs and do not produce brebas?] The most well know examples of this type are Smyrna and Calimyrna.

 

Splitting

 

            [...]

 

            http://figs4fun.com/More_Info_Splitting.html

 

http://figs4fun.com/fpix/FP956-97.jpg

 

 

Sucker

 

            [...]

 

            http://figs4fun.com/fpix/FP522-86.jpg

 

Synconium

 

The fig tree (Ficus carica) is a plant native to the Mediterranean region. The edible part of the fig, called the 'fruit' is not really a fruit at all, it's a synconium. A synconium, in the fig's case anyway, is a green globe with an opening on one end. Inside the synconium are a cluster of hundreds of flowers. If pollinated, these flowers produce drupelets, tiny bubbles of fruit material with a seed in the center. http://archaeology.about.com/od/domestications/a/fig_trees.htm

 

Third Crop

 

            See Mamme

 

U C Davis

 

            See University of California, Davis

 

University of California, Davis

 

The USDA maintains its National Germplasm Collection of Figs (and several other fruits and nuts) at the University of California, Davis on a property known as the Wolfskill Experimental Orchard (WEO).

 

http://figs4fun.com/WEO%20Collection.html

 

Variety

 

            [...]

 

Wasp, Blastophaga psenes

 

            [...]

Fig trees are symbiotic--that is to say, they can only survive to reproduce with the assistance of another creature, in this case a fig wasp. Without the fig wasp's pollinating activities, the tree would never produce a germinated seed for the next generation; alternatively, the fig wasp would never survive without the fig tree's food and shelter. At the proper time, female fig wasps enter the opening of the synconium, and attempt to inject their progeny (eggs) into the flowers. If fig wasp eggs are injected into the short hermaphrodite fig flowers by their mothers, the new fig wasps feed on the developing fruit and spend most of their lives within the synconium until they reach adulthood. Still inside the syncomium, the females are fertilized by the males and then the females gnaw their way out of the synconium. On the way out, their bodies are dusted with pollen. Their sole remaining job in life is to find another synconium, enter it, inject their eggs, dust the pollen off their bodies and die.

http://archaeology.about.com/od/domestications/a/fig_trees.htm

            http://www.figweb.org/Interaction/Life_cycle/index.htm

Winter crop

 

            See Mamme

 

Winter Protection

 

            [...]

 

Wolfskill Experimental Orchard

 

            See University of California, Davis

 


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TucsonKen

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Reply with quote  #12 
Wow, Jon, this will be very interesting & useful! You might also want info on
Watering
Summer Protection (for outside of Paradise)
Recommended varieties for newbies (even if it's just a link to the Best Varieties at Your Location thread)

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Reply with quote  #13 
Lime, and what it does
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Reply with quote  #14 
Neck, stem, fig meat, sugar spots, lignify, callus

Dan
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Reply with quote  #15 
Hi Jon! Thanks as always!!

Maybe a section on Potting up/Root pruning.  If I missed it already listed I apologize:)!

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Reply with quote  #16 
pinching, apical dominance would be two that are discussed.

i understand that these are general (fundamental) concepts, but applicable.

it would also be nice to see a breakout of leaf terms.  (ovate, cordate, spatulate, etc.... with examples)

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Reply with quote  #17 
Lots of good ideas. Now, we need some good answers.

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pitangadiego

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Reply with quote  #18 
OK, a few people sent in some good ideas, a couple people sent in some good answers. I have updated the FAQ above.

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Reply with quote  #19 
Many, many THANKS Jon,
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Reply with quote  #20 
In past thread I've posted in detail about fig eyes (open/closed/sealed/size/etc), splitting, and cracking before. I'll dig those old posts up later and post some "answers" on those topics.

Leon had the best air layering thread (with pictures) I have ever seen.


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Reply with quote  #21 

Here are the two best threads I have bookmarked on air layering:

Leon: http://forums.gardenweb.com/forums/load/fig/msg070227508091.html
Dennis: http://figs4funforum.websitetoolbox.com/post?id=4849944

 


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Reply with quote  #22 
Alan, sounds like a good research project for you. ;-)))

Interestingly, Shtawi gets ripe in December/January, which is winter, but they are main-crop figs, not third crop.


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Reply with quote  #23 

Winter crop above the equator is early summer crop below the equator?  ;)


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Reply with quote  #24 
Potting mix recipes.
Mold vs. Fungal attack vs. Bacterial rot.
Resistant varieties e.g. cold, cracking, spoiling, soil ph.
Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, figs associate with endomycorrhizal fungi by the way.

I think the clamshell berry container solution should be put in pest control for sure.



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Reply with quote  #25 
Jon,

This is a great idea.  Yours is an exceptional site and you're always working on making it more complete.

There's a typo in the seed/seedling section.  It says sedxually, in the first sentence, as well as prfoduced and ffrom, plus that sentence isn't complete.

I'm not trying to be critical--I thought it might make a difference to you.

noss

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Reply with quote  #26 
how about a list / legend of all the different abbreviations for all the fig trees variety you all have...BT, BM, VDB, etc
LSU sounds normal and strait forward next to some of these other ones 

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Reply with quote  #27 
Noss, thanx,. I didn't make an attempt at spell checking or anything else, yet.

VDB = Very Dumb Blond.


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Reply with quote  #28 
BM = Black Madeira
BT  = Brown Turkey
VdB = Violet de Bordeaux
and yes, there are some other VDB's; specially in CA...

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Reply with quote  #29 
First Draft uploaded here.

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Reply with quote  #30 
Thanx to the people who have contributed ideas, answers, pictures and other help. This will be a work in progress for a while. I have changed the format a couple times, already, and think I'll leave it this way for a while. Eventually it will need to be split up, I am sure.

Please continue to participate.


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Updated today.

My White Adriatic has breba and main.

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