Register  |   | 
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment   Page 1 of 2      1   2   Next
Ben_in_SoFla

Registered:
Posts: 135
Reply with quote  #1 
Down the road I would like to have as many of my fig tree varieties without Fig Mosaic Virus and was wondering if anyone has tried to do the same and if there is any interest in at least starting a group to gather and search for as many FMV free varieties as possible with exchange privileges within the group.

This would have to be confirmed by a lab test and possibly (if one is available) a kit to test for FMV. Has anyone tried any lab test to confirm the presence or absence of fmv?

Usually it is clearly visible on new growth on cuttings, but sometimes on large and strong growers it is not as easy to confirm.
Does anyone know of any nurseries that mention FMV free trees for sale? I have not seen any...

Ben


__________________
Ben, North Central Florida Zone 8B - 9
Herman2

Registered:
Posts: 2,605
Reply with quote  #2 
FM Virus was never defined,and there is no test to probe if a cultivar is infected or not.
The money for research that was needed,were never allocated


go4broek

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 1,189
Reply with quote  #3 

An interesting follow-on Ben is has anyone propagated a seemingly uninfected tree that later revealed FMV infection in the rooted cutting? I have not.


__________________
Ruben
Cibolo, TX/Zone 8b
Wish List: Dalmatie, Italian 258, Martin's Unknown (not the Italian), CdD-N, NdC, Signora, Latarolla, Stella!
Check out my online journal @ http://davesgarden.com/community/journals/vbc/go4broek/83546/
nelson20vt

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 1,858
Reply with quote  #4 

I have also read that seedling figs dont carry fmv yet I have 2 seedlings that show yellow spots on the leaves. Coincidence?


__________________
Mississauga, ON, Canada Z5B/6A
Ben_in_SoFla

Registered:
Posts: 135
Reply with quote  #5 
I'll contact Agdia labs and Critter creek labs on Monday, not sure if they have anything close enough to use for FMV... we'll see what they say.

__________________
Ben, North Central Florida Zone 8B - 9
rafed

Registered:
Posts: 5,300
Reply with quote  #6 
I do know the Paradise Nursery had FMV free figs ( for the most part ).
I must have ordered fifteen or twenty from them and not one showed signs of FMV.

Too bad I didn't know how to store them better at the time so I took a big loss. One time was due to vandals and couple times were due to inexperience.

Too bad they are not in business anymore, Sybil and Rob were among the greatest.
Dan_la

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 1,409
Reply with quote  #7 
FMV free fig trees are definitely out there and are usually found in isolated locations. I have FMV free specimens of Black Mission, Adriatic/strawberry, and Beall.......as well as most of the LSU bred figs. 

Dan
Semper Fi-cus
ejp3

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 671
Reply with quote  #8 

I have a few mature plants that show zero signs of fmv, but when I root new specimens, they show fmv.  Even a few I have got from collectors that claim they are fmv free, show fmv upon rooting. 


__________________
Ed NY zone 7
Wish list  CDD Blanca/Negra

rafed

Registered:
Posts: 5,300
Reply with quote  #9 
I think the FMV to figs is as common as the Flu to us humans.

How strong are you to avoid it or how weak are you to get it?

Small young and newly rooted ones show it but later it goes away.

Some never heal and some never have it.


satellitehead

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 3,654
Reply with quote  #10 
Quote:
Originally Posted by go4broek
An interesting follow-on Ben is has anyone propagated a seemingly uninfected tree that later revealed FMV infection in the rooted cutting? I have not.


I have. I have received reportedly FMV-free cuttings from at Least three sources, only to rootthem and find FMV-like symptoms. I am careful to say "FMV-like" because I have no way to confirm that it truly is FMV, nor if it may have possibly spread from other trees in infancy.

Without a positive way to test for FMV in the home orchard, I think this endeavor is quite impossible. Many adult trees will show no signs, but the rooted cuttings they produce will show signs I'm their first months of life.

I wish you luck. I was seriously looking into tissue culture, but I'm afraid that there are so few trees (relatively) that are FMV-free and such an opportunity for re-infection that it is a noble but nearly impossible task to achieve - and we are assuming that FMV isn't practically part of the f. Carica genetic code at this point, in the same way that human DNA has been mutated/affected by viruses as well. Some scientists claim that humans are more virus than "human" at this point.


__________________
Jason
Atlanta/Grant Park area - z8
afigfan

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 220
Reply with quote  #11 
What about researching treatments that would lesson the effect of FMV. If the majority of figs carry the disease, perhaps some kind of supplement might be more effective than isolated, possibly uninfected tree collections.

__________________
-James
In search of: Gypsy/Zingarella, Cammuna Small Black, and Barada cuttings(even one bud wonders)
Dan_la

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 1,409
Reply with quote  #12 
The virus is spread easily by leaf chewing insects. You would have to separate the virus free cuttings from the ones which are known to already have the virus in order to maintain virus free conditions to the next generation. If you root a virus containing cutting right next to one which is free of the virus......any bug chewing insect could easily infect them all.

Dan
Semper Fi-cus
satellitehead

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 3,654
Reply with quote  #13 
Dan, It is my understandin from research done in Turkey that it is spread only by mites, not any leaf cutting insect, and also not by pruning shears or other tools.
__________________
Jason
Atlanta/Grant Park area - z8
Dieseler

Registered:
Posts: 8,235
Reply with quote  #14 
Ben to my knowledge there is no kit outside of a lab to index for FMV.

Ive had perfectly normal looking plants for several seasons then i noticed the virus for whatever reason suddenly appear.
Also it hides very well after showing early in season on some plants for example my Vdb.

To date what has shocked me more is not the virus on the leaves but on the fruit itself seeminly causeing them to drop . I have shown those pictures as well in past and recently with not much interest in those threads.

But to cure FMV it has been done and the plants were then indexed after 1 full year and remained virus free - grown in lab conditions.
I have  2 files that were sent to me with the promise of not putting them online because they are paid publications.
This was 3 years ago and probably more "detailed " information on how exactly this was done is freely available now i dont know.

I did dabble around trying to see for myself what a fig meristem actually looks like with the aid of my jewlers eyepiece in this thread link below i started nearly 3 seasons back in post# 11
 and i think i did get to it from pictures i have seen of one online in the past.
http://figs4funforum.websitetoolbox.com/post?id=3095055&highlight=mosaic+virus

I know longer worry about the virus , just the virus in the fruit that im now watching is what concerns me because i will have to destroy several plants if they keep dropping there fruit cause of it.
nypd5229

Registered:
Posts: 1,901
Reply with quote  #15 
I bought a Tashkent fig tree from Raintree this year. Tree looked horrible. Stunted, curled leaves and little growth. Then a root sprout appeared and is shooting up, no signs of anything-Actually beautiful, lush and green. I am now trying to air-layer it but even if successful, it still carries the genes for FMV. It may appear again or it may not.
__________________
Dominick
Zone 6a-MA
Ben_in_SoFla

Registered:
Posts: 135
Reply with quote  #16 
My initial response from AGDIA LABS,

"Hello Ben,

  I’ve done a little searching on Fig mosaic virus, and unfortunately there are no tests available since researchers are still trying the characterize the virus. Often, although we might not have a specific test for a particular virus, we will have a general PCR test that can detect the pathogen along with other related viruses. Fig Mosaic Virus was just recently put in an ill-defined group called “Enamoviruses”.

  There has been a lot of research  recently on viruses in figs, and there a couple of other pathogens, Fig leaf mottle-associated virus and Arkansas fig closterovirus, that we can detect using our Closteroviridae Group PCR Test. Our PCR testing can be more expensive than other tests in our catalog. The current price for testing one sample (up to ten leaves) for Closteroviridae is $172.89. Each additional sample would cost approximately an extra $16.00.

If you have any further questions or concerns, please do not hesitate to ask.

Sincerely,

Debi

 

Deborah Groth-Helms

Manager, Testing Services

Agdia Inc.

30380 County Road 6

Elkhart, IN  46514

"



Crittercreeklab is doing only orchid related virus tesing, nothing related to food crops.

Next stop, UC Davis.... Maybe they can point to a lab that has done some research or testing on FMV.


__________________
Ben, North Central Florida Zone 8B - 9
Dieseler

Registered:
Posts: 8,235
Reply with quote  #17 
Hi Ben ,
 Uc Davis appears to have done some study around 2005 i never saw a follow up perhaps due to funding constraints.
Here is link.
There have been other studies but they are fee based sites.
http://ucce.ucdavis.edu/files/datastore/391-303.pdf
satellitehead

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 3,654
Reply with quote  #18 
Wow, who knew there were like over a half a dozen viruses that infected figs?

http://ddr.nal.usda.gov/bitstream/10113/47395/1/IND44475845.pdf

http://www.sipav.org/main/jpp/volumes/0110/011017.pdf

__________________
Jason
Atlanta/Grant Park area - z8
satellitehead

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 3,654
Reply with quote  #19 
More reading from UF ISAF about common fig diseases:

http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pg010

I still say that there are not varying degrees of FMV infection.  I think it is more likely that plants which appear "heavily affected" by FMV are infected with both FMV and one or more other viruses (see links explaining other viruses in the post above this one) like AFCV-1, AFCV-2 or FBV-1.


__________________
Jason
Atlanta/Grant Park area - z8
Dan_la

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 1,409
Reply with quote  #20 
I will say this about FMV........

I have traveled all over South Louisiana in order to find new fig varieties and have visited with many many fig trees and their owners. To find any fig tree which has ANY sign whatsoever (i.e. even one single infected leaf) of FMV is very rare indeed.  FMV-free fig trees are the rule and not the exception in my area.

Dan
Semper Fi-cus
satellitehead

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 3,654
Reply with quote  #21 
It is not uncommon for totally mature trees to show NO sign of FMV.  In fact, most trees I have which are heavily affected by FMV "grow out of it" by the time they are 2-3 years old.  Adult trees are much less prone to show symptoms.  I have received cuttings of supposedly "FMV free" trees and propagated them in an isolated area only to find FMV-like symptoms when the cuttings are in the first year, and those signs disappear by year two or three.

The only way for anyone to truly know if trees are "clean" is to (literally) test for FMV.  We don't have a way to do that.  I wouldn't be surprised to find that even the healthiest looking tree is actually infected with FMV.  Then, I would also not be surprised to find a tree which seems "more affected" by FMV is also infected with, say, both FMaV and AFCV-2, for example.

We also have no way to test to see if FMV is truly the infection causing the problems we see.  Clearly, there are half a dozen viruses that infect figs, and some have similar symptoms, some are (apparently) more harmful than others.  Who is to say that what we are seeing in our trees is actually FMV without a genetic test?  It could actually be FMaV that is infecting them, or FBV-1!  OR maybe it is an AFCV virus strain!  We really have no way to know.

__________________
Jason
Atlanta/Grant Park area - z8
oldghost

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 235
Reply with quote  #22 
Hi,  on that web site ( http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pg010 ) it states Horticultural or Citrus Oil may be used to manage the virus .
I would imagine it would be used early in spring before the buds?
Has anyone on this forum tried that?

FIG MOSAIC VIRUS (unknown virus)

Symptoms and Signs: Mottling of the leaves is very common. In some varieties, leaves and fruits may be dwarfed, and some leaves may be malformed. On leaves, mosaic spots will appear yellow and may cover large areas of the leaf. Mosaic spots on the fruit may be subtler in appearance than the leaf symptoms. In some cultivars, premature defoliation and fruit drop can occur.

Several viruses have been associated with fig mosaic symptoms, but none have been unequivocally demonstrated to cause the disease. Recently, studies have identified a closteovirus called fig leaf mottle associated virus (FMaV), which is associated with almost all diseased fig plants. The virus is likely vectored by the eriophyid mite, Aceria fici, as well as through vegetative cuttings.

Cultural Controls: Clean propagation stock should always be used.

Chemical Controls: There are no chemical recommendations available for controlling the virus. Various refined horticultural oils (i.e., crop oil, citrus spray oil, etc.) may be used to manage mites.


__________________
Nick.
Brooklyn Zone 7B
Dan_la

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 1,409
Reply with quote  #23 
What I do know for sure......is what I have seen and what I continue to see with my OWN "well calibrated eyes". There are very few fig trees in South Louisiana (young or old and in between) that have EVEN ONE single FMV distorted leaf on them....or one distorted leaf from any other virus and/or other fig disease. James Robin's trees did not have any FMV on any of them when I first discovered his place quite a few years ago. The cuttings that he obtained from UCD California and which he rooted taught him and me what the disease looks like.

Dan
Semper Fi-cus.
satellitehead

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 3,654
Reply with quote  #24 
I don't have x-ray eyes nor microscopic eyes, so I can't say what's underneath the leaves.  Maybe you are different, but I don't have superhero vision ;)

I can tell you that I'm infected with the "mono" virus and have been since I was 13, but I show no signs of it.  I test positive every time I have ever gotten drastically ill, and I always test positive.  I'm lucky, I'm apparently only a carrier of the virus.  Humans are not the only species that contract a virus and show no symptoms.  It doesn't mean we aren't infected.  Sometimes we don't show the infection until our immune system is compromised by another bacteria or virus.  Plants are undoubtedly the same (we are all living tissue).

I guess the only way we will ever know if your eyes are that well calibrated, or if there is any such thing as an "FMV Free" tree on this planet will be having some kind of genetic test.  But we would need a genetic test for all of the other half dozen or more viruses which infect figs in order to see what is actually showing mottling and shape distortion of fig leaves, since this is a common symptom amongst multiple viruses, it's not just isolated to FMV.

__________________
Jason
Atlanta/Grant Park area - z8
Dan_la

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 1,409
Reply with quote  #25 
It is extremely easy to spot an infected leaf or branch on a fig tree.......no special talent or glasses of any kind are needed........... (;>)

To say that all figs trees have FMV and that we just do not yet see the symptoms on the tree is like saying we all have cancer and we just do not yet see the symptoms on the person. IMO, that is ridiculous. There are lots of FMV free fig trees that are growing in isolated sections of this country.

Dan
Semper Fi-cus
satellitehead

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 3,654
Reply with quote  #26 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan_la
It is extremely easy to spot an infected leaf or branch on a fig tree.......no special talent or glasses of any kind are needed........... (;>)


To that point, it's very easy to see a skin condition on a human also, but that condition could be caused by contact dermatitis, seborrhea, psoriasis, scabies, eczema or (???). Is the condition viral, bacterial, environmental, genetic, or something else? 

You see, there are some telltale signs that are common among all types of rashes which a person would say, "Aha!  THAT is a RASH!!", but without further testing you have no idea what caused the skin condition ("rash") and why it is there.  Some may have the skin condition and it never presents, or presents in a place where the human eye cannot/will not see.  Plants are no different, but we only know about a half a dozen viruses/infections that cause leaf mottle and other deformities or growth impedements.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan_la
To say that all figs trees have FMV and that we just do not yet see the symptoms on the tree is like saying we all have cancer and we just do not yet see the symptoms on the person.  IMO, that is ridiculous.


Maybe we all do have cancer, inherently, but we must encounter certain conditions/chemicals/environmental stimulus to trigger or activate it.  Maybe some day we will know - as of now, we do not know much about cancer (it's a good example to use, though).  This "trigger" condition in illnesses is not a stretch, it is not fantasy, it really happens.  Many of us know that weather conditions will "trigger" certain qualities in figs, includingthe dominant leaf shape, the flesh color of the fruit, growth characteristics and coloring, to name a few.  Some varieties even have the ability to become more hardy with age, which is incredible to me.  Two of the same varieties can present very different results and behaviors in different places.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan_la
There are lots of FMV free fig trees that are growing in isolated sections of this country.


Buuuuut, this is your opinion.  It is not fact.  Until you can prove it with a test of some sort, it will remain an opinion.  A man of science like yourself should understand this ;)

__________________
Jason
Atlanta/Grant Park area - z8
Dan_la

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 1,409
Reply with quote  #27 
If you CHOOSE to believe that all fig trees have FMV.......go right ahead. I do not. And I do know that a fig tree which does not display ANY distorted FMV looking leaves on it, usually performs a lot better than a tree that does have obvious signs of FMV.  Given a choice......give me one that does not have any signs of FMV.... EVERY TIME. I do not need any other scientific "TEST" other than that simple critieria........(;>)

Dan
Semper Fi-cus
nypd5229

Registered:
Posts: 1,901
Reply with quote  #28 
I had a conversation with Nick ( oldghost) last night. We were discussing FMV.

There is no way, no how that FMV is an absolute in these trees.

If you go up and down the streets of the Boroughs of Brooklyn and Queens, you will see all those trees in backyards are FREE of any sign of FMV.

I have been to parts of Italy and never ever remember seeing a thing but beautiful healthy trees. The trees in the Portuguese community of Fall River, MA have in ground trees with no sign of FMV.

In my opinion, this is a phenomenon inherent to the America's and possibly pot culture.

Some may be more prone to it but it is not an absolute given that a fig tree will get it or show it.

__________________
Dominick
Zone 6a-MA
TucsonKen

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 1,306
Reply with quote  #29 
Dan and Jason, I appreciate the discussion/debate, as well as its civil tone; it's very instructive to hear different sides of the issue. When I first heard about FMV, I had only heard one side and the whole thing sounded pretty cut-and-dried. Now I'm far less dogmatic about it. I'm not even sure that every instance of mottled coloration or leaf deformation that I originally chalked up to FMV was truly caused by the virus. It usually feels like progress to put a name to things, but in my experience life tends to be more complicated.

The thing that's starting to sort itself out through personal observation is, that with only one exception (Black Madeira), all of last year's rooted, one-gallon cuttings that were planted in the ground this year, seem to have outgrown all of the visible symptoms, except for mild mottling of leaf pigmentation on some plants. I don't know whether the initial spring flush of foliage will continue to show evidence of the virus (or whatever it is that's causing the problem), but at least in my own yard and growing conditions I'm confident that symptoms will be brief and won't interfere significantly with growth or fruit production.

I would definitely prefer not have any FMV among my figs, but since I do, and am not aware of any way to get rid of it, I'm glad to know that in my specific situation it so far seems quite manageable. Time will tell!

__________________
Ken
Tucson, Arizona
Zone 8b
bullet08

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 6,911
Reply with quote  #30 
last year before i got into figs, i read enough about the FMV. after reading them, i decided to forget about it.

i assumed that all the tress that i'll get will have FMV. if they produce figs, great. if they don't, too bad.

after being on this forum, i realized that there are so many different types of figs and so many different strain from each named figs, even if everyone of my fig trees do have FMV, i'm sure to end up with enough figs to eat and enjoy.

the trees that i have currently do show slight FMV. but so far, VdB produced edible figs. paradiso gene has good size fig on it, and kathleen black is growing very nicely. white greek is very young, but i can see it growing almost every other day. i'm happy FMV or not.

now.. rooting the cuttings is totally another matter. that i need to learn and control so i can have more trees with FMV or not.

pete

__________________
Pete
Durham, NC
Zone 7b

"don't talk to me about naval tradition. It's nothing but rum, sodomy and the lash." - sir winston churchill
"the problem with socialism is that eventually you run out of other people's money." - the baroness thatcher

***** all my figs have FMV/FMD, in case you're wondering. *****
***** and... i don't sell things. what little i have will be posted here in winter for first come first serve base to be shared. no, i'm not a socialist...*****
Dieseler

Registered:
Posts: 8,235
Reply with quote  #31 
Here is but 1 example in my yard Violet De Bordeaux.
Has FMV but not set back at all by it, just looks different in spring when it displays it but nice later in season when its difficult to spot but still slightly noticeable..
Fig production is good as tree ages like most any other tree in my yard with only 1 exception.

And
yes it good to see adults act like adults we all are different .  ; )

Attached Images
jpeg Violet_De_Bordeaux_31.jpg (117.67 KB, 54 views)

satellitehead

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 3,654
Reply with quote  #32 
Quote:
Originally Posted by nypd5229

If you go up and down the streets of the Boroughs of Brooklyn and Queens, you will see all those trees in backyards are FREE of any sign of FMV.
 
Free of any "visible" signs.  I have twenty trees I know have FMV, but they show zero signs of it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by nypd5229
I have been to parts of Italy and never ever remember seeing a thing but beautiful healthy trees. The trees in the Portuguese community of Fall River, MA have in ground trees with no sign of FMV.
 
Established trees (especially in-ground) show less/zero symptoms.  We know from personal experience of many members here that FMV is more pronounced in high-stress environments.  We know this because when a tree is just rooted, this is high stress, FMV is very obvious.  Hot periods cause high stress for potted trees, FMV often shows signs at that time.  With proper watering and proper strength (through maturity), we know that FMV is less obvious or not visible at all.  So what you are reporting and what Dan is reporting makes perfect sense.  Why would a mature, old, established, otherwise healthy tree show signs of FMV when we know it's only most obvious when a tree is under major stress?

Quote:
Originally Posted by nypd5229
In my opinion, this is a phenomenon inherent to the America's and possibly pot culture.
 
It isn't inherent to north/south America, the virus is researched around the world and affects figs in - Turkey, for example - just as much as here (enough they're doing research studies, Turkey has had some great ones).  So, even in Fig Heaven FMV is a persistent problem.  It doesn't always present the same way in different varieties, and it also doesn't always show signs.  Like I said, I've taken cuttings from trees that were "clearly" FMV free.  Know what I found in the first 3 months of rooting?  They were showing signs of FMV. 
 
I guess my point is, I have yet to see cuttings that are truly "FMV free", and this is not an insult to anyone here, but every cutting I've shared or been generously given has presented signs of FMV at some point, either very small or very great.  Even some of my best growers.
 
It is common that signs

__________________
Jason
Atlanta/Grant Park area - z8
satellitehead

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 3,654
Reply with quote  #33 

Quote:
Originally Posted by TucsonKen
Dan and Jason, I appreciate the discussion/debate, as well as its civil tone; it's very instructive to hear different sides of the issue.


I'm glad my words haven't come across as argumentative, because I struggle with that.  I'm happy to see it staying civil where we can cuss and discuss. 

Quote:
Originally Posted by TucsonKen
I'm not even sure that every instance of mottled coloration or leaf deformation that I originally chalked up to FMV was truly caused by the virus.


This is what I'm trying to say above.  People say FMV.... but there are at least five other viruses that negatively affect fig trees in similar ways.  Who is to say that a "severe case" of FMV isn't actually, like, the FBV-1 virus instead?  Or maybe even a combination of FMV and FBV-1? 

We really do not know, and I doubt we ever will.  We should really begin saying, "tree is affected with something that causes mottled leaves and stunted growth", but "FMV" is easier to put out there ;)

Quote:
Originally Posted by TucsonKen
The thing that's starting to sort itself out through personal observation is, that with only one exception (Black Madeira), all of last year's rooted, one-gallon cuttings that were planted in the ground this year, seem to have outgrown all of the visible symptoms, except for mild mottling of leaf pigmentation on some plants.
 
This makes sense.  In-ground growing is ideal.  I doubt you would see nearly as much symptom (if any) from an in-ground tree unless it was very stressed (under- or over-watering, for example).

__________________
Jason
Atlanta/Grant Park area - z8
nypd5229

Registered:
Posts: 1,901
Reply with quote  #34 
Something then is either suppressing it or magnifying it.
__________________
Dominick
Zone 6a-MA
satellitehead

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 3,654
Reply with quote  #35 

Stress.  Either from environmental conditions or the presence of other infection, most likely.  Stress seems to be the dominant factor which causes FMV to present in my short couple years of experience with figs/FMV.  It's the same across all 70- or 80-something varieties I've rooted so far that have shown symptoms.  Remove the stress, and the symptoms of FMV diminish or disappear for most of them.


__________________
Jason
Atlanta/Grant Park area - z8
nypd5229

Registered:
Posts: 1,901
Reply with quote  #36 
Or is FMV getting more of the blame then it should. Are what we are seeing symptomatic of other viruses not known.

I have a Salem Dark that has huge beautiful leaves but is blotchy looking. FMV, something else, or just nothing.

__________________
Dominick
Zone 6a-MA
Dan_la

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 1,409
Reply with quote  #37 

IMO, much of what is being seen on young trees Is NOT FMV........IMO, it's likely due to a nutrient imbalance of some sort.....not caused by any virus.

And  yes indeed, new starts can and OFTEN will have absolutely NO SIGNS of any kind of FMV. Herman2 is going to soon be getting one such fig known as "Beall" from yours truly. How many FMV free Beall starts have you seen?????  If you got one from UC Davis.....it WILL have FMV. Well, I have seen a lot without FMV, BECAUSE I have a BEALL tree that did not come from UC Davis and that tree IS FMV FREE for all intents and purposes.


The FACT remains that VERY FEW fig trees (< 5%) that are growing in South Loisiana have ANY signs of deformed FMV leaves.......none, zero, NADA signs of FMV!! As I stated earlier, years ago NONE of JR's starts had any sign of FMV. That changed when he started getting cuttings from Callifornia.

Dan
Semper Fi-cus

nelson20vt

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 1,858
Reply with quote  #38 
I honestly dont believe that every fig tree out there is infected with FMV. This is my believe, regardless of evidence im sticking to my guns even if im dead wrong wich I doubt I am. FMV is a common problem world wide, Now my main concern is are we adding to this problem by sharing cuttings?

What I mean is if were taking cuttings from several different trees some might have fmv other might not if the prunning shears are not cleaned well will this transfer fmv to the fmv free plants? Because I know I didn't have any fmv on my Colasanti Dark until I grafted a black Mission bud onto it. The sucker I removed from the tree before being grafted still no signs of fmv and the figs are bigger than the ones on the mother plant.

__________________
Mississauga, ON, Canada Z5B/6A
Dan_la

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 1,409
Reply with quote  #39 
That is a very interesting observation Nelson. I can see where grafting could easilly infect an uninfected tree.

Dan
Semper Fi-vus
satellitehead

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 3,654
Reply with quote  #40 
Quote:
Originally Posted by nelson20vt
What I mean is if were taking cuttings from several different trees some might have fmv other might not if the prunning shears are not cleaned well will this transfer fmv to the fmv free plants?


According to the research being conducted in Turkey (I believe Michal/montrealfig posted originall in '09) there is no risk of transmitting FMV from dirty shears.

I don't believe it, but that was their conclusion.

I can understand how it would transfer by grafting, the virus is undoubtedly in the plant material.  I just don't understand how 'swapping sap' would not cause the transmission.

__________________
Jason
Atlanta/Grant Park area - z8
Dieseler

Registered:
Posts: 8,235
Reply with quote  #41 
Hi Nelson you write
Now my main concern is are we adding to this problem by sharing cuttings?

Personally i feel were way past the point of no return on that matter.
No offense just my opinion.

I dont even care about weather a source has it anymore because from my experience all mine do very well despite it they

except my 1 type to date, it may change i always have hope for it.

Actually it may be boring "to me" if that plant did act and look normal i might think
now there is surely something wrong with it.   ; )

nypd5229

Registered:
Posts: 1,901
Reply with quote  #42 
Normal is not allowed on this forum. We're all a little looney. Some more than others! ;-)
__________________
Dominick
Zone 6a-MA
Dan_la

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 1,409
Reply with quote  #43 

Here's some work that was done in California on Fig Mosaic Virus.......note that all fig trees in California have this mite. Also note that "seedlings" from infected trees DO NOT HAVE FMV. That is subtantiated by the fact the the O'Rourke bred figs DO NOT (yet)  HAVE  FMV. The virus is spread by mites. And IMO, it is very likely spread by leaf eating June bugs Time will tell.......

Nelon, note that the virus is spread to a non-infected tree when an infected scion is grafted to it. Your obsrvations were spot on.........

http://ucce.ucdavis.edu/files/repositoryfiles/ca1101p12-66858.pdf

Dan
Semper Fi-cus

TucsonKen

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 1,306
Reply with quote  #44 
Good info Dan, thanks for posting it.
__________________
Ken
Tucson, Arizona
Zone 8b
daygrower

Registered:
Posts: 255
Reply with quote  #45 
This is just my take on this
Personally I think everyone is right and wrong there are many things that make leaves mottled and or distorted FMV I believe is not always the case but it is everywhere.
In the past there were areas that definatly did not have FMV that is no longer the case if someone bought a fig at a box store then the area has the virus.
That does not mean that every tree has it or does it if mites or some other critter can transmit they are everywhere.
I guess whet I'm saying is its here and we should put our resourses into getting our trees to grow out of it the best we can.
Believe me if you look at the ailments that are out in the plant world we have it easy dealing with this miner ailment.
P.S I know some of my facts are probably wrong so don't yell too loud

__________________
Jim
zone 8b
Live Oak Fl.
satellitehead

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 3,654
Reply with quote  #46 

@Jim, that's the beauty.  Nobody yelling.  I think everyone here is probably right, and the reality is we won't know how right they are for another couple of decades.


__________________
Jason
Atlanta/Grant Park area - z8
daygrower

Registered:
Posts: 255
Reply with quote  #47 
Thats why I like this forum people are very civil.
The yelling thing was in fun I just forgot the smiley face :)

__________________
Jim
zone 8b
Live Oak Fl.
satellitehead

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 3,654
Reply with quote  #48 

Blasphemy!!   ;)


__________________
Jason
Atlanta/Grant Park area - z8
nelson20vt

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 1,858
Reply with quote  #49 
Hey Dan, this is one of my Kadota seedling's check out the leaves. All of my 3 kadota seedlings have this spotting on the leaves I figured its fmv? But yet I have read that seedlings are supposed to be virus free? Clearly not the case here.




__________________
Mississauga, ON, Canada Z5B/6A
Dan_la

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 1,409
Reply with quote  #50 
According to UCD researchers who have specifically studied FMV.......they stated emphatically that fig seedlings DO NOT HAVE FMV. In fact UCD used FMV free seedlings for their control population. Seedling were all they could find that was assured FMV free. Had you seen the link I provided to that UC Davis FMV report?? They also state that not all discolored leaves are an indication of FMV....

However, like you......I would not declare your seedling as FMV free. IMO, that could just as easily be a nutrient imbalance of some sort. Thanks for posting.

Dan
Semper Fi-cus
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.