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handarius

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Reply with quote  #1 
Here is my technique, let the pictures describe:

1. Prepare the tools (cutter and adhesive tape / wrap plastic)

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handarius

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2. 
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3. 
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4. 
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5. 
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6. 
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7. 
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8. 
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9. 
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Reply with quote  #10 
Then, placed the plant in shady area about 2 weeks. 
Hope this techique usefull for all member in this forum. 
Cheers..


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FiggyFrank

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Reply with quote  #11 
Fits like a glove!  I'd love to try this.  I wonder how an English BT and Hardy Chicago would turn out.  Thanks for sharing!
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handarius

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Reply with quote  #12 
@ FiggyFrank = hope yours can be success. 


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Chivas

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Reply with quote  #13 
I will try this when I get the chance, I have a feeling I will need to become very good at grafting as my space is running out.
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DesertDance

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Reply with quote  #14 
Great pictoral!  Please keep us posted in a couple weeks to see the progress!

Suzi

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newnandawg

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Reply with quote  #15 
Love the lesson in photo's.
Figfinatic

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Reply with quote  #16 
Just plastic wrap works? No fancy grafting tape? I might be able to try it then.
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Grasa

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Reply with quote  #17 
this seems so obvious! why didn't I think of it?  you are a genious. Looks great, fits like a glove. Hope it grafts nicely.  I wonder if there is a better time of the year to do this. We still have  abit of day light here, but will start raining and will be cold, wet and raining...however, if covered with plastic, that rain won't matter, except it will be perfect for mold... hum, I am so tempted to go try doing this.
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DesertDance

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Reply with quote  #18 
You grafted this green wood to green wood late in the season?  Would this also work dormant wood to dormant wood? 
Suzi

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Figfinatic

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Reply with quote  #19 
Similar question: So is it more successful to graft green wood to brown lignified wood (not dormant)?   Green to green (non-lignified to same)?  

What's your success rate with plastic wrap?   Anyone else try it? Maybe do plastic wrap and then foil around it?

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Chivas

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Reply with quote  #20 
I did two grafts today using parafilm grafting tape, one negronne and one VdB, the scion was smaller than the root stock but one side is perfectly lined up on the cambium so it should take still, we will see in 2 weeks, I have it inside, 18-22 degrees celcius so I think it has a very good chance.
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handarius

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Reply with quote  #21 
@ All:
1. The better way is just try this method by yourself, experience is the best knowledge; most of your questions will be answered by your experience. :)
2. The better result is: dark-green wood to dark-green wood (sory, I dont know what in English), and the same size on diametre.
3. In Indonesia, too difficult find fancy grafting tape or parafilm grafting tape; so I use the plastic wrap and its work.
4. The percentage of this method is up to 90%  :)

@ DesertDance / Suzi:
Yes, I will report the progress of this method by picture 1 week and 2 weeks later.



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dfoster25

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Reply with quote  #22 
Forgive me for asking something that may be obvious, and I mean no disrespect, but "Why"?

Is there a benefit to this on Figs?   Normally grafting on apples, roses, grapes, peaches, is done to have a less hardy or sensitive plant on top, grafted to the rootstock of a very hardy or disease resistant cultivar.  Or to dwarf the cultivar. The problem with this is I think if the top isn't hardy, It's just going to die back to the ground anyway and sprout up as the unintended variety. 

I don't see a huge benefit.  I would think you would have to constantly trim out the suckers.  I would try it if I could see a reason.   Fill me in.

Maybe:   To obtain a hard to root variety.

Maybe:   Get a headstart on a variety.

Maybe:   Gain vigor?

Maybe:   I answer my own question?


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DesertDance

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Reply with quote  #23 
Many of us fig collectors don't have enough space for all the varieties, so grafting a few varieties on various branches gives us the enjoyment of many varieties. 

Simple!  The suckers would come from the mother plant, and you would always have to trim those out whether or not you graft.

Suzi

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Reply with quote  #24 
Thanks Suzi:

Not a bad reason.   At some nurseries here in Michigan you can find apples, pears, peaches with 5-6 different grafted branches.   I always though that would be dificult to make sure as the plant got older you didn't prune out and lose a variety  here or there.  And they would have to grow different.  I guess with good permanent labeling, this would be an advantage.


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handarius

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Reply with quote  #25 
Adriatik is not good to produce the Fruit in Indonesia. I often use Adriatik for the rootstock.
I have hundred of Adriatik in pot, so its will be usefull for rootstock (not good to produce fruit). 
One branch of good cultivar (such as Panachee) can be used for 10-15 grafting on Adriatik; so I can produce Panachee so quickly.

Here is my grafting after 2 weeks:

Panachee on Adriatik:

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handarius

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Reply with quote  #26 
Blue Giant on Adriatik:

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handarius

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Reply with quote  #27 
I think it is success...  :)

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handarius

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Reply with quote  #28 
I think it is one of the best reason: 6 varieties in 1 single plant:

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Grasa

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Reply with quote  #29 
Genious!   looks fantastic.. must be hot there...huh? I love you can see the callosing through the clear tape. Great Job.  thanks for sharing.    I wonder if it would be ok to do this grafting now while tree is going into dormancy.  Any thoughts?
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Grasa
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Grasa

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Reply with quote  #30 
what do you do to protect the new grafted branch from breaking (wind or heavy fruit load?)
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Grasa
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handarius

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Reply with quote  #31 
@ Grasa: If from the beginning used the same size of branch, then the new grafted branch will strong enough and will not break.
Yes, In Indonesia just have 2 season, rainy and dry season, and I think fig is so comfort here. :)

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Grasa

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Reply with quote  #32 
when do you remove the plastic wrapping?  Do you tie something else for bracing or support?
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Grasa
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handarius

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Reply with quote  #33 
I remove the plastic wrap after 1,5 - 2 months, depend on the progress of grafting.
So far, I do not use any support for the grafted branch (but I think it is better to use some support). :)

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FrozenJoe

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Reply with quote  #34 
Very nice tutorial.  I may have to do that one day.  Thanks for showing how.
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zaitun

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Reply with quote  #35 

Cool Pic and Very clear tutorial of grafting technique , Bro Handa .
Thanks for sharing .

Salam ,
Zaitun
slingha

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Reply with quote  #36 
Check this thing out for grafting!

http://www.grafting-tool.com/magento/index.php/
Grasa

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Reply with quote  #37 
I see some of this for as much as $90- the thin knife  method worked fine. I guess if you have a fig farm with thousands of trees, or become a professional grafter,  this would be a good gift to have
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dfoster25

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Reply with quote  #38 
Man, that final plant looks awesome!  Imagine what one of those babies would fetch on E-bay.    

Imagine a:

Maltese Falcon
Ronde de Bordeaux
Atreano
Vista
Lebanese Red
Sals

all on one tree.  Something to dream about. 

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DesertDance

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Reply with quote  #39 
Slingha,  I got that tool for my birthday!  Haven't used it yet, but next spring when things are growing crazy, I surely will use it!

Suzi

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Reply with quote  #40 
How about updating this handarius? Looks like an interesting method to me. Is it still going strong?
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Reply with quote  #41 
I wasn't a member this first time this aired.  Very nice.  I am really tempted to give it a shot.
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james

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Reply with quote  #42 
I tried it several years ago on a fig and several mulberry limbs.  It is a very easy graft to accomplish, but I did not have good success with it.  I'm not planning on doing any more grafting until 2016.  I might try it again.
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Reply with quote  #43 
@ James - It's simplicity is what makes this technique so appealing. I think handy mentions a 90% success rate somewhere in the thread, so it's a real shame you've had such poor results.

Looking a bit iffy at the moment, so I'm hoping others might weigh in with their experience if they tried this method, or possibly recommend a more reliable one.

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Reply with quote  #44 
BTW, have you guys seen this?:

http://figs4funforum.websitetoolbox.com/post/my-frankenfig-6346903?highlight=figenstein

Also very impressive.

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Reply with quote  #45 
Costas,

I hope others had better luck, as well.  I'd like to try it again.  I agree it is very simple technique.  It can be accomplished with pruning shears instead of a knife.  Mostly, I used a razor blade which was equally simple.  

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2016 Wish List:  Dārk Pōrtuguese, Grānthāms Royāl, Lātarolla, Negrettā, Nōire de Bārbentāne, Rockāway Green, Viōlet Sepōr, Viōlette Dāuphine.  Iranian figs are always welcome.

loquat1

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Reply with quote  #46 
Well, if you do try it again, I wish you better luck next time around. I'm still tempted to try it myself. If it fails, it would still be useful practice.
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Reply with quote  #47 
Quote:
Originally Posted by handarius
I think it is one of the best reason: 6 varieties in 1 single plant:
[6in1]


Could you share the latest pic of same tree? Whats the latest update?
lobboroz

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Reply with quote  #48 
man i really hate photobucket...
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jdsfrance

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Reply with quote  #49 
Yup. The forum is getting harsh to read with these posts ... For future reference they say ...
I guess it will prevent some people to lick their screens everyday ... LOL ...

Well, you still have the text and other posts that may talk of the same topic ...

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