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TheFigster

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Reply with quote  #251 
HELLO.. I AM LOOKING FOR A GOOD SIZED PETER'S HONEY TO BUY
DOES ANYONE HAVE ONE OF THESE TO SELL????? OR EVEN A TIGER PANACHE ????

THANKS
HAPPY NEW YEAR
THEFIGSTER

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WISH LIST:I'M IN ZONE 8A BY FORT WORTH, TX  I prefer very sweet figs and two crops a year if possible.  I am now only planting fig trees with green or yellow flesh when ripe! 

jenniferarino83

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Reply with quote  #252 
HARDY CHICAGO
FLOREA
IMPROVED CELESTE
MARSIELLE BLACK VS
VDB/rdb

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Jennifer A. Brown 
Wishlist: NONE
Boise ID ZONE 5
SCfigFanatic

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Reply with quote  #253 
Dang looking at the chart, I see why I moved to the south east part of USA.
Growing up and farming in ohio.....what a nice change of location here to retire.
Then I learned I could grow figs here. No wonder all my varieties seem to grow
as good as any other. All about location.


Doug

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South Carolina zone 7b-8

Off and on member since 10/1/2012

SR_Bill

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Reply with quote  #254 
USDA Zone 9B / Sunset Zone 14
Any suggestions?  I poured through this 6 pages and didn't see anything specific.
Thank you, Bill

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Hardiness Zone: 9 B (Santa Rosa-Sonoma County, CA)
brandon87

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Reply with quote  #255 
So far the best I've had growing in Houston are Improved Celeste and Alma.
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Zone 9 NW Houston--

Looking to trade for LSU DC1 


My current inventory- 
https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1FsSskE-Q3YCqSrYNnrfujkuSHX1sdJS6gaHBv0hJO-E
alcarson42

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Reply with quote  #256 
I AM WALDORF MARYLAND, ZONE 7; I AM A  74 YEAR YOUNG JUST LEARNING ABOUT FIGS TO GROW. 6 FIG TREES (GIFTS) THAT HAVE NOT BEGAN TO PRODUCE:
(DO NOT FORGET I AM A NOVICE OPENED TO LEARNING ABOUT FIGS)
PANACHE,
BLACK MISSION,
LITTLE FIGGY,
LITTLE RUBY,
YELLOW LONGNECK,
ATREANO

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Alberta L. Carson
chucklikestofish

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Reply with quote  #257 
Quote:
Originally Posted by alcarson42
I AM WALDORF MARYLAND, ZONE 7; I AM A  74 YEAR YOUNG JUST LEARNING ABOUT FIGS TO GROW. 6 FIG TREES (GIFTS) THAT HAVE NOT BEGAN TO PRODUCE:
(DO NOT FORGET I AM A NOVICE OPENED TO LEARNING ABOUT FIGS)
PANACHE,
BLACK MISSION,
LITTLE FIGGY,
LITTLE RUBY,
YELLOW LONGNECK,
ATREANO
~welcome ,this is the best place to learn,i have learned a lot here,good people,good info,also a good search forum,~
AltadenaMara

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Reply with quote  #258 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SR_Bill
USDA Zone 9B / Sunset Zone 14
Any suggestions?  I poured through this 6 pages and didn't see anything specific.
Thank you, Bill

This is just my second year growing figs in 9B and all my trees are very young, but my favorites so far for 2016 are: Figo Preto/Black Madeira, Unknown Pastillere, Ronde de Bordeaux, I-258, Bourjassotte Grise, Hative de Argentueil, Col de Dame Noir, El Molino and LSU Purple. 

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Mara  Southern California  Zone 1990= 9b   2012= 10a  2020=?

 

Figfanatic57

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Reply with quote  #259 
SR Bill,
Here in Phoenix zone 10-11, seems like the Figs do better in ground. The following have done well here in ground.
VDB, Raspberry Latte have fruited well.
Potted:
Martencia Rim,Ponte Tresa,PeloponnisiakaAspra and CDD Rim have been growing well for 1st year.
Smyfigs

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Reply with quote  #260 
Welcome, Alcarson42!!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by alcarson42
I AM WALDORF MARYLAND, ZONE 7; I AM A  74 YEAR YOUNG JUST LEARNING ABOUT FIGS TO GROW. 6 FIG TREES (GIFTS) THAT HAVE NOT BEGAN TO PRODUCE:
(DO NOT FORGET I AM A NOVICE OPENED TO LEARNING ABOUT FIGS)
PANACHE,
BLACK MISSION,
LITTLE FIGGY,
LITTLE RUBY,
YELLOW LONGNECK,
ATREANO

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Meg-Hardiness Zone 10a

Looking for...

Socorro Blk
Jolly Tiger
Lamperia Preta
Herschtetten
St. Jean
Black Ischia

"The best way to show my gratitude is to accept everything, even my problems, with joy." ~ Mother Teresa  
"Do not pass by a man in need for you may be the hand of God to him." ~Proverbs 3:27~  
"He performs wonders that cannot be fathomed, miracles that cannot be counted." ~Job 5:4

 

MyDogMike

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Reply with quote  #261 
Zone 6b

Best producer this year was a Black Mission (assuming that's what it is) from a big-box store this year. 

Most of my other trees are still young.   
Paul

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Reply with quote  #262 
My best Variity are unknown Variity and my persistent afghan Seedlings.

I surch more Varriity from Afghanistan and Xinjiang, so that they also by - 20 Grad Celsius not destroyed.
I have much new Variity in Test - young Plant and for the future much hundreds Seedlings.


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excuse my bad english - i am German and live by River Lahn Zone 7
Wish List: Kashi yellow Giant, Lemon, Yulsky, Tauro, Jumbo, Kroatian Yellow Giant, Ceretto, Galizia Negra, LSU Gold,...
My Fig: Texas Everybearing, Violette Pfälzer, Frühe Früchte, Bordesholm, Baldur, Bl. Dolomitenfeige, Kunduz, Gigant, Nordland, Schweizer Brünli, Batumi, Sukhumi, Adscharien, Hardy Chikago, Jerusalem, Pauls Frostkönigin, Su Zhuo, Early Black, Excel, Armenian, Isfahan, Afghanistan, Petrovaca, Mitschurinska 10, Bulgara, Taurus, Viola, Bayernfeige, Palmata, Johannis, Bornholm Diamant, Peretta, Negronne, Kaukasus, Kandahar, Braunschweig, Excel, Xinjiang Yellow, Wuhan, Qinpi, Baimi, Olympian, Alma, Frühe Dalmatiner, Jingaofen, Jin Orphan, Massui Dauphine, Bojihong, Deanna.
snaglpus

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Reply with quote  #263 
Owensboro
Strawberry (so amazing)
Strawberry Verte (crazy good)
Smith
Sal's
Marseilles Black
Col de Dame Gris
Brown Turkey Not!
Brown Turkey PFTP (absolutely one of the best and is not Brown Turkey!)
Unknown Black from Spain
Hardy Chicago
Kathleen Black
Florea 
Black Maderia
Pastillere
Marva Silka
Piedmonte
LSU Tiger
Italian Honey
Texas Everbearing
Gino's
Black Jack
Spicewood
Black Italian
Excel
Kadota
Improved Celeste
Tacoma Violet
LSU Purple


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Dennis
Charlotte, North Carolina/Zone 8a 

cjccmc

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Reply with quote  #264 
Hi Dennis,

Is that a list of all your figs with your favorites at the top? 

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Conrad, SoCal zone 10
snaglpus

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Reply with quote  #265 
No. I have a whole lot more. But these listed above were the best tasting this year. There were others.......I just didn't think they were all that great. Like Atreano and Papa Jon and others.
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Dennis
Charlotte, North Carolina/Zone 8a 

TucsonKen

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Reply with quote  #266 
I have a big problem with figs souring. Out of approximately two dozen varieties I've fruited, only black mission has consistently produced high quality figs on a healthy tree, without any souring.
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Ken
Tucson, Arizona
Zone 8b
binbin9

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Reply with quote  #267 
The best fig for me this year surprisingly was my Golden Riverside. I don't know if it was mislabeled by the gentleman that we bought it from in Santa Cruz but after tasting a properly ripe one. I was blown away by the taste. It was firm and meaty like a good black madeira and had a taste of honey as well as berry tones. So good!

Origination:
http://seattlegardenfruit.blogspot.com/2015/10/santa-cruz-adventure-golden-riverside.html

Tasting:
http://seattlegardenfruit.blogspot.com/2016/10/october-fig-bonanza.html



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Ben B.
Seattle, WA

My Seattle Garden Blog | Fig Addiction | My Youtube
WISH LIST: Calderona | Any Rimada | Oro | Peretta | Rigato del Salento | Any fig over 100grams =)


dfoster25

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Reply with quote  #268 
I258
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Zone 6, SE MICHIGAN
-14F 1-7-14
-23F 2-?-15
   6F 1-18-16
   6F 1-7-17
AltadenaMara

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Reply with quote  #269 
Quote:
Originally Posted by binbin9
The best fig for me this year surprisingly was my Golden Riverside.

Thanks so much for this report. I rooted two cuttings last year but they didn't fruit their first year. I was trying to decide if I should prune and root some more to share with friends. This fig has received such mixed reviews, it's good to know that here on the West coast some people really like it.
Nice blog! And an exceptionally good fig tasting video. I especially liked how you went into a little more detail about the taste of each fig: sweet/not too sweet, berry/no berry, jammy/jelly/syrupy, and even how your friends and family reacted.

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Mara  Southern California  Zone 1990= 9b   2012= 10a  2020=?

 

SCfigFanatic

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Reply with quote  #270 
Last year the top producer was the mead fig.
Above average flavor but the tree stayed loaded with figs
the whole season.
I am rooting more of these for myself,,and a few other people that
might get surprises in the mail.

I had others with slightly better taste, but not near as productive.

This is a fairly unknown about winner.

Doug

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South Carolina zone 7b-8

Off and on member since 10/1/2012

jrdewhirst

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Reply with quote  #271 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dfoster25
I258


When did it ripen for you?  Pot or ground?  Thx.

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Joe D
Z6B - Bristol, RI
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Reply with quote  #272 
Chuck, let me see what I end up with come spring.
I may have a extra mead rooted.
I wanted to add 2 more to my orchard as well, but I already have 2  trees
in my orchard so I'll be ok.
I started a bunch of them and other ones from my own trees.
I like to test my own cuttings each year.
If they grow for me, they can grow to whoever I sent cuttings to.

I will keep you in mind, and pay closer attention to them
to get the best success I can. I'm trying another rooting
method that has a lot of mead in it.

Doug

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South Carolina zone 7b-8

Off and on member since 10/1/2012

mgginva

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Reply with quote  #273 
One possible bone to pick; that being the claim that VdB, Negronne and Vista are the same. My Vista does not appear to be the same as my Negronne.

I have been trying different varieties to find the ones that do the best in the area I live. Last year I burned 42 varieties (can't sell or gift trees that are too big to ship and considered by me to be inferior for my region). I'm not ready to release my findings - I did release ripening lists for '14 and '15 - there are here on f4f. I have had over 400 varieties and currently have 225 or so with another 50 on their way.
It is my hope to find 25 varieties that work well here and will make up my orchard and produce figs for sale. I feel like another 5 years or so and I'll be closing in as I have been doing this since 2006.
Dennis thx for the info - you are always good for something and have been for years.

I think what we need are groups of growers who live in similar zones that can co operate and share variety characteristics. I have one forum buddy with a larger collection then mine who I share everything with and we consider our collections linked to each other. Our goal is information collection so we can grow appropriate varieties.

It's a huge shame Hermann2 left as he was a treasure trove of info and the best I've ever seen at IDing unknowns. Ultimately this is our problem - i.e. we don't get along well enough as the trouble makers on this forum don't seem to have to answer for their inappropriate behavior. oops venting - sorry.

mgg

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Michael in Virginia (zone 7a) Wish list: Tiberio, Campera, Calabacita, Cuello Dama Blanca
jrdewhirst

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Reply with quote  #274 
Michael --

It's understandable that you would not be ready to release findings re the best cultivars for your area -- It's a daunting task to narrow 400 varieties to the 25 best.  But would you tell us the names of the 42 varieties that you burned last year?  Plus maybe other varieties that you discarded in prior years? 

In general, the forums contain much more positive comment on varieties than negative.  I get that -- just about any fully ripe fig is good.  Nevertheless, many members may not have the time for extensive evaluations and so would prefer to jump quickly to the better varieties that match their taste preferences and growing conditions.  To this end, it would help collectors to know which varieties other people have chosen to abandon.

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Joe D
Z6B - Bristol, RI
mgginva

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Reply with quote  #275 
Joe,
I have listed favorites several times on this site.
I will not list figs I do not like or ones I have gotten rid of. I do a huge amount of work to gather info and once my project is done I will share the conclusions I have gleamed from growing many varieties here in Virginia.
I don't believe in releasing data from unfinished research. That and any negativity posted on this site tends to create hostility and frankly I am just now posting here after leaving with most of my friends to other sites as f4f has not yet learned that it desperately needs moderators and there is still too much fighting on this site. If Hermann2 leaving doesn't create changes this site will fade away. My return here is tentitive as even though there are still people here I consider friends, 75% of my friends left during the big exodus in feb. of 2015.
If it seems I'm not being very helpful there are reasons I'm not willing to get into but one example is Ronde de Bordeaux. Here it is one of the first to ripen and it produces very attractive figs for months. In a long and extensive taste test done with a 2 star Inn the chefs rated RdB #1 yet in other areas of the country it is not that well liked (ex. Florida). Releasing partial findings just creates misunderstandings.

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Michael in Virginia (zone 7a) Wish list: Tiberio, Campera, Calabacita, Cuello Dama Blanca
SCfigFanatic

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Reply with quote  #276 
Sounds good.

Doug

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South Carolina zone 7b-8

Off and on member since 10/1/2012

jrdewhirst

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Reply with quote  #277 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mgginva
Joe,
I have listed favorites several times on this site.
I will not list figs I do not like or ones I have gotten rid of. I do a huge amount of work to gather info and once my project is done I will share the conclusions I have gleamed from growing many varieties here in Virginia.
I don't believe in releasing data from unfinished research. That and any negativity posted on this site tends to create hostility and frankly I am just now posting here after leaving with most of my friends to other sites as f4f has not yet learned that it desperately needs moderators and there is still too much fighting on this site. If Hermann2 leaving doesn't create changes this site will fade away. My return here is tentitive as even though there are still people here I consider friends, 75% of my friends left during the big exodus in feb. of 2015.
If it seems I'm not being very helpful there are reasons I'm not willing to get into but one example is Ronde de Bordeaux. Here it is one of the first to ripen and it produces very attractive figs for months. In a long and extensive taste test done with a 2 star Inn the chefs rated RdB #1 yet in other areas of the country it is not that well liked (ex. Florida). Releasing partial findings just creates misunderstandings.


OK.  To me it's just data.  It's the user's responsibility to handle it sensibly.  But I realize that people often fail to be sensible, and I respect your concern about unintended adverse consequences.   "No good deed goes unpunished," as they say.

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Joe D
Z6B - Bristol, RI
mgginva

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Reply with quote  #278 
Joe,
Here's a situation I do not want to be in;
lets say I release what will be at best partial data and someone invests heavily in 100 trees based on what they think my data says and I find much better varieties then what the early partial data suggests.
Now as after 10 years of doing this I nail down some great new (perhaps just new to me) varieties and plant them in my orchard and this other 100 tree orchard fellow sees that I have not planted a single tree of the variety he invested in. He then draws the conclusion I sent him down the wrong path to handicap my competition (even though there is no way you could produce more great figs here then you could sell.) and he becomes very unhappy.
The problem with raw data is, like statistics, it is easy to misunderstand what you are reading.

I do not want to take responsibility for anyone getting into an unwanted situation. The 400 tree orchard near me had years of zero production after 2 very cold winters damaged the 3 varieties they chose to plant. There just isn't anything more important then finding a variety that will be dependable, productive and cold hardy. I have been collecting cold hardy varieties as no matter how good a fig tastes it just won't work in a planted orchard if it can't weather the cold.

One other thing to add;
as there is virtually zero data out there about the best varieties to plant -- I worry that folks give way too much credit to those of us with large collections. If I were planning a fig orchard from scratch and had little experience with figs I don't know where I'd turn. Va Tech, our land grant university has virtually zero fig info and there are no other real places to turn. So if this person then came upon a person like me who has been trying to solve this issue I'm afraid that person would (due to few other choices) turn to whatever info I've released and and give it more weight then it deserves. I am not an expert and do not want to be responsible for others who haven't done their homework -- and not because they didn't want to but because there was no place to turn. There are just no reference materials out there - no growing figs for dummies even so in this vacuum anything sent out into the ether becomes far more important then it may have a right to be.

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Michael in Virginia (zone 7a) Wish list: Tiberio, Campera, Calabacita, Cuello Dama Blanca
jrdewhirst

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Reply with quote  #279 
Michael -- 

It's OK, please don't sweat it.  

Personally, I'm just a hobbyist.  Re advice, I'm more in the "caveat emptor" camp; but you are clearly a much more compassionate person than me.  Nevertheless, I can't and won't criticize.  Meanwhile, if I have to try 15 different Mt Etnas and 8 different Adriatics just to figure out which is the best to grow here, that'll be my cross to bear. :)

FYI, Ronde de Bordeaux (in-ground with protection) is early, productive, and tasty here (Z6B).

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Joe D
Z6B - Bristol, RI
robertharper

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Reply with quote  #280 
Michael, is so right about the fig data one might find on the Internet.

One must do ones own investigating if you are planning on investing in a large fig orchard. The best you can get from those of us who are growing figs outside, in cold parts of the country, are cultivars to investigate. Not make a final decision on what to plant based on information we might post.

There simply is no definitive material out there on figs in cold areas. Plus, each location can be so very different. A fig that grows well in one location can be a total disaster grown just 6 miles away.

My testing is now going on 12 years or so, and we are still trying to find a fig, that is the best for us, as close as possible for our location. But, what was good two years ago, can be a total bust two years later.

As of this moment I like Hanc's English Brown Turkey, LaRadek's English Brown Turkey, and Florea, for our zone 5b/6a area of Connecticut. Last winter got down to minus 10 degrees Fahrenheit, and both Hardy Hartford, and Marseilles Black vs, were able to keep wood alive at a height or 8"and 12", with out any type of winter protection. Which is acceptable for us, since we prune our figs any way down to around 24", each fall.

JOE D, You appear to be in a growing zone 6b, in Rhode Island. So, you might want to investigate the above five figs. After they have become mature, they may work for you.

This is my first posting after being out sick for the last two years. So, I'm running way behind on filling orders for plants. But hope to be able to start filling back orders sometime later this fall. 

A tentative report of what we have grown and testing here 10 years or so, is available. But, it is also two years late in being edited.

If any one wants to read it, send a request directly to me at: robertcharper@gmail.com

Bob Harper 


cjccmc

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Reply with quote  #281 
I've done a bit of research on this forum to find what experience growers in my or similar climates consider their best figs. The interesting thing is that a variety which they might have posted as their WOW fig in say 2013 doesn't even get a mention a couple of years later. Is it because it's no longer "new" to them, their tastes in figs changes, fig quality not consistent, better varieties found, etc.? There are a lot of variables here.
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Conrad, SoCal zone 10
mgginva

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Reply with quote  #282 
Conrad,
There is one more reason and its ugly.
There was a group on here -- gone now (mostly) that used to hype certain figs so they could sell on Ebay for absurd amounts of money and it worked. Ex. Lebanese Red, Maltese Falcon, Maltese Beauty, etc. One it did not work on was MaCool.
These guys bragged about how huge their collections were and did whatever they could to impress - mainly the newbies - and then they overcharged for what I call the "fad figs" which as far as I can tell are not the super figs they claimed. I have them all and frankly I'm not impressed -- but I will give them the 5 years I give every variety to prove itself.

I wish the newbies would stop chasing what they think are the most wanted varieties. Next year it will be different varieties and this year's will be almost forgotten. These fad figs are rarely tested and many are sold by folks who aren't growing them. The very first to get them have great trade bait and can make very good money, but everyone else is just over paying.
Newbies need to learn to build their collections with good solid varieties that have been tested and grown by many and found to be solid. There are, many times, better figs but there just isn't any way to make the big money selling them. Varieties like Negronne (VdB), LSU Gold and Battaglia Green, etc.
I sell varieties I grow and have produced figs from and varieties I think are good. If I'm selling it I have experience with it and think it is worth the 5 years it takes to find out if it's good for you or not. I'm not trying to blow my own horn but a lot of figs on Ebay are ones someone just found in a parking lot and gave it a new name and got help hyping it. Ok -- yep I'm venting a bit but every year I throw out varieties that were fad figs 5 years before and just have not turned out to be any better then the good old standards and in many cases they are inferior.
Remember that the figs Pons thinks are great and folks pay $500 for a cutting for may not be any good at all grown in say Virginia. Try and buy figs from someone in the same type of growing environment as yours and ask them for recommendations.
I do not know of a single example of an over $200 variety that has proven to be an excellent fig. The closest would be Ronde de Bordeaux as it was a very popular fig a few years ago - but was never really super expensive - and has proven --in my collection -- to be superb, but a friend of mine in Florida is not impressed at all.
Also at some point you have to decide if you are a fig grower interested in producing excellent figs or a baseball card collector just interested in getting whatever you don't have.


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Michael in Virginia (zone 7a) Wish list: Tiberio, Campera, Calabacita, Cuello Dama Blanca
VeryNew2Figs

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Reply with quote  #283 
Newbie here.  I just like growing stuff...the more the merrier.  If I can get a Shinning Star fig within my budget I would.  And, yes, I've used the analogy of card collecting when I have to explain why I have so many fig plants.  I see through the eyes of a hobby gardener as opposed to the eyes of a businessman.  Both have their place.
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Cheryl
Chicago, Zone 6a (That's what they say, but it still feels like 5)
Growing:
  Hardy Chicago, Black Mission,
Brunswick, Kadota, Ischia Green, Desert King, Osborne Prolific, Lattarula, Malta Black, Violette de Bordeaux, Texas Everbearing, Beall, Adriatic, Nolo Pink Eyed Lady,  Celeste, Nero 600 m, Violetta Bayernfeing, Marseilles Black VS, Sucrette, Scott's Black, Large Negronne, Croatian, Raspberry Latte, Alma, Longue D'Aout, Pel de Bou, Lloral, Black Triana, Tarantella, Dominick's, Sweet Diana, Bronx Italian Purple, Ciccio Nero, Ronde de Bordeaux (gifted - thank you),  Panache (gifted - thank you) Lyon France (gifted - thank you).

~~~The Addiction is Real~~~
SCfigFanatic

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Reply with quote  #284 
I'm stopping at 100 trees.
I already have doubles and triples of proven favorites.
vdb, rdb, meade, red libya and a couple others.
Time will tell how many varieties will be worth keeping to me.
I like to have 3 vdb all producing at the same time.

Doug

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South Carolina zone 7b-8

Off and on member since 10/1/2012

eboone

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Reply with quote  #285 
Michael - I have to respectfully disagree with you on one point - you are an expert, relatively speaking.  Compared to those with less time involved, or with less of an inquisitive mind, or with less varieties to learn from and, maybe most importantly, compared with others in your region, you are an expert, since there are no others with the info you have gleaned.  You said it yourself - even the agricultural experts at VaTech do not know or understand figs ( like you do ).  Just like I consider Dennis an expert and Herman2 an expert.  People with information they have learned thru experience and study.

We appreciate those who are willing to share that info to help the rest of us along.  None of us expect you to know everything, but what you share is so important to those of us a few years behind you in experience.

Thanks !!!

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Ed
Zone 6A - Southwest PA     
---------------------------
Wish list: a bountiful harvest to share and enjoy... and an Improved Celeste
jrdewhirst

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Reply with quote  #286 
Quote:
Originally Posted by robertharper
Michael, is so right about the fig data one might find on the Internet.

One must do ones own investigating if you are planning on investing in a large fig orchard. The best you can get from those of us who are growing figs outside, in cold parts of the country, are cultivars to investigate. Not make a final decision on what to plant based on information we might post.

There simply is no definitive material out there on figs in cold areas. Plus, each location can be so very different. A fig that grows well in one location can be a total disaster grown just 6 miles away.

My testing is now going on 12 years or so, and we are still trying to find a fig, that is the best for us, as close as possible for our location. But, what was good two years ago, can be a total bust two years later.

As of this moment I like Hanc's English Brown Turkey, LaRadek's English Brown Turkey, and Florea, for our zone 5b/6a area of Connecticut. Last winter got down to minus 10 degrees Fahrenheit, and both Hardy Hartford, and Marseilles Black vs, were able to keep wood alive at a height or 8"and 12", with out any type of winter protection. Which is acceptable for us, since we prune our figs any way down to around 24", each fall.

JOE D, You appear to be in a growing zone 6b, in Rhode Island. So, you might want to investigate the above five figs. After they have become mature, they may work for you.

This is my first posting after being out sick for the last two years. So, I'm running way behind on filling orders for plants. But hope to be able to start filling back orders sometime later this fall. 

A tentative report of what we have grown and testing here 10 years or so, is available. But, it is also two years late in being edited.

If any one wants to read it, send a request directly to me at: robertcharper@gmail.com

Bob Harper 




Bob --

First of all, welcome back!!!  I knew that you had been sick, and I had no idea what you were up to now.  I'm very happy that you are well enough to think about figs again!

Next, thanks for the offer of your report.  But actually, I already got it from you, a year or more ago.  It was a great help.  I re-read it every few months just to refresh my memory.

Re the 5 varieties, thanks to some good advice, I have had Florea in-ground for almost four years and Marseilles Black vs for almost three.  I'm very happy with both.  And thanks to reading your report, I have 1-yr old cuttings of both Hanc's BT and Laradek's EBT in pots, destined for the ground soon.  I don't have Hardy Hartford, but I've got Hardy Chicago and Sal's EL in-ground and a bunch of other Mt Etnas in pots, so I probably have that territory covered.

I'm hoping that you can resume your great work. Please feel free to pass along any observations or recommendations without anything but gratitude from me.

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waynea

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Reply with quote  #287 
Michael...don't try to change what can't be changed, $$$$ and bragging rights trumps all. I sometimes get hooked on the newest, rarest, super rare but I have a maximum that I will pay. I have so many Smiths, CdD B,N & G, RdB, VdB, BMadeira, Violete Sollies, JH Adriatic, Damatie, VS, MBVS, LSU S BLack, other LSU, St Rita, Meade, B Green .... etc...very reasonably priced varieties that work well for me. Sometimes I get caught up in the hype but I have a limit and I am willing to wait until the "hypers" lose interest and find a newer hype. Then the old hype is priced within reason. Do not forget, all the figs that I previously mentioned were expensive at one time. Sometimes its tough to even get a bid on CdD Blanc...can you imagine? Anyways I am 100...well maybe 99% behind everything that you have said Michael....but some things just can't be changed...it's no fault of those who try...it is what it is. JUST KEEP TRYING TO HELP OUT THE NEWBIES, THEY NEED SOMEONE LIKE YOU TO STEER THEM IN LOGICAL DIRECTION, someone who cares about them and not their $$$$$. Those who care about newbies will set them up with information that they need to be successful and offer cuttings and plants at a reasonable price to get them going. Hang in there.
Figgysid1

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Reply with quote  #288 
Fern Forest HI, 96771 (Zone 12a)

Best 5 this last year, tasted 54 total. I had at least 200 figs of each to judge them from.

1. Figo Preto (60-100) grams (15 trees) & 200+ more rooting.

Best productivity, best flavor, best looking, very consistent flavor quality. Long picking time, if you pick it a day or two early it's still very flavorful. Berry/tropical fruit aftertaste: Mango and banana is what I tasted most strongly.

2. Grise Olivette (70-100+) grams (40 trees)

On the outside this fig is not going to win any beauty contests. Tan, brown, reddish brown. Grise is just a fancy French word for brown. Very large, syrupy, unique texture, marshmallow strings, a nice mix of sugar, berry and honey flavors.

3. Napolitana Negra (70-100+) grams (40 trees)

Very productive, vigorous growing, large black mission-like figs. The other three mission types I grow have lower production and smaller figs.
Typical mission type fig flavor.

4. Violet De Bordeaux (40-60) grams (50 trees)

Realiable & Workhorse are the words that best describes this fig. Figs ripen on nearly ever node. Figs are all close to the same size and flavor is realiably good. Fruits continuously until they go dormant in January. Resin berry flavor.

5. LSU Hollier (40-70) grams (80 trees)
Green figs, red interior. Dryer weather is better for these. Among the top in flavor, if they don't get wet when ripening. Sugar berry flavor, very sweet.

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(Zone 12a) Big Island, Hawaii, 2,400 ft elevation, Fern Forest. Avg. July High 77,Avg.Jan.Low 56 Precipitation days 290, annual rainfall 201.80 inches.
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Reply with quote  #289 
This thread is very valuable a lot of important information was discussed , necessary
for a newbie like me, thank you very much.
mgginva

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Reply with quote  #290 
Geeez Ed, Where do I send your check!! Seriously I do appreciate the comments.
Wayne, Don't get me wrong I was the same newbie I referenced. I chased the fad figs just like everyone else. 
Figgysid, Do you by any chance have Black Madeira to compare with your Preto?

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Michael in Virginia (zone 7a) Wish list: Tiberio, Campera, Calabacita, Cuello Dama Blanca
Figgysid1

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Reply with quote  #291 
@mgginva: Nope. The numerous times people mentioned in threads, that U.C. Davis Black Maderia was very infected with FMV, made me avoid it.

I'm looking for healthy trees for commercial fruit production. I double sourced my Preto instead. Both sources produced very healthy, vigorous, productive trees.






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(Zone 12a) Big Island, Hawaii, 2,400 ft elevation, Fern Forest. Avg. July High 77,Avg.Jan.Low 56 Precipitation days 290, annual rainfall 201.80 inches.
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Reply with quote  #292 
I also have and read Bob Harpers report. Some really great information there. Anyone in zone six or lower should contact Bob for a copy. A must read. Glad to see you well enough to post again Bob, hopefully we here more from you going forward.
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mgginva

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Reply with quote  #293 
figgysid1,
I think just about anything that comes out of UCD is badly infected with fmv. I went through over a dozen Black Ischias before I found one that is now doing well and producing great figs.
I am comparing Black Madeira to Preto as they both produce great fruit. One of my Black Madeiras is doing very well. 

I am also looking for the same thing, i.e. I want to produce figs commercially on a scale of about 200 - 250 trees (to begin with) along with another orchard for trialling "new" varieties.

After 10+ years of experimenting with different varieties I have pinned down only a handful of varieties that I absolutely want to build my orchard around.
My goal is to find 25 varieties that will produce quality fruit here in Zone 7.

Last year I moved and was also in a serious accident so my crop was vastly reduced but the year before all my fruit went to The Inn at Little Washington - arguably the best eatery - within 250 miles. They were thrilled with my figs and sent someone to my property 3x per week to collect figs.
I made a deal with them - I'd sell them all my crop for $9 per pound and label each variety and in return the chefs would rate the figs they liked and disliked the most.
This information was valuable because it helped reinforce other tastings I've done.

As time goes by that 25 variety goal may end up being reduced to 15.

There is a local orchard of about 400 trees but they grow Mission, Champagne and something that looks just like the other two so they have 3 larger honey type figs. After 2 hard winters they produced no figs at all as these are not appropriate varieties for this area. Seeing the disaster which is their orchard is just more fuel added to the fire - the right varieties need to be located if the project is to ever pay for itself.
I have grown a lot of different fruits and figs are easily the most dependent on proper variety ID as there is no help from the extension folks.
Do you grow Ronde de Bordeaux?
thx,
mgg

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Michael in Virginia (zone 7a) Wish list: Tiberio, Campera, Calabacita, Cuello Dama Blanca
waynea

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Reply with quote  #294 
Thanks Michael, please keep us updated on your project and comparisons.
Figgysid1

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Reply with quote  #295 
@mgginva: I have 20 RDB but I am waiting for the fruit to ripen, any day now.. If it's good I was going to up it to 100 trees. They are healthy, vigorous trees, are loaded with figs and have a tight eye as well.

I have a few others that are growing well and loaded with figs. I have not tasted these 3 yet. But they should have ripe figs soon. > 3 weeks estimate.

Raspberry Latte (25 trees)
JH Adriatic (55 trees)
LSU Scott's Yellow (25 trees)

The only tree I got last year that did not make a single fig was LSU Scott's Black.

Right now I plan on planting 1,200 seedlings in ground at 4ft spacing on 1 acre. Small scale fig breeding program...

And 1,200 common figs, 600 in pots and 600 In ground on 2 acres at 8 ft spacing. With hoophouses over them for rain protection.

Other good varieties I'm growing are.

1. Panachee (200)
2. Peter's Honey (85)
3. LSU Gold (35)
4. LSU Golden Celeste (30)
5. LSU Purple (30)
6. MBVS (30)
7. Italian Black Becnel (25)
8. Sal's/EL (15)
8. Sultane (15)
9 Hardy Chicago (10)
10. Flanders (10)


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(Zone 12a) Big Island, Hawaii, 2,400 ft elevation, Fern Forest. Avg. July High 77,Avg.Jan.Low 56 Precipitation days 290, annual rainfall 201.80 inches.
waynea

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Reply with quote  #296 
Hey figgysid1, What a setup! The hoop houses are definitely not for snow/cold....zone 12A...definitely for rain, it probably rains most days. Sounds like a winning project. The outcome of the seedlings should be interesting...keep us posted.
mgginva

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Reply with quote  #297 
figgysid1,
thx 4 the info.
Can cuttings be sent from the mainland to you?


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Michael in Virginia (zone 7a) Wish list: Tiberio, Campera, Calabacita, Cuello Dama Blanca
mgginva

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Reply with quote  #298 
Figgysid1,
It will be interesting to find out how Adriatic JH does as the green/red figs with a berry flavor are my favorite (Battaglia Green and Col de Dame Blanc being 1,2).
I hope you'll keep us informed.
mgg

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Michael in Virginia (zone 7a) Wish list: Tiberio, Campera, Calabacita, Cuello Dama Blanca
Figgysid1

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Reply with quote  #299 
@mgginva: I can receive cuttings from the mainland. I have 600sq ft space of cuttings rooting, so will be holding off on getting more anytime soon.

I have Strawberry Verte as well, so will be able to compare to JH Adriatic. I will start a thread about everything called (my 2017 season) soon.

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(Zone 12a) Big Island, Hawaii, 2,400 ft elevation, Fern Forest. Avg. July High 77,Avg.Jan.Low 56 Precipitation days 290, annual rainfall 201.80 inches.
jean

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Reply with quote  #300 
Jean  38630 france

figuier del portogallo
madeleine des deux saisons
brown turki
pastliere
ronde de bordeau

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