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nunuorig

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Reply with quote  #1 
Okay folks, I can use some help here identifying this really tasty unknown.  A friend introduced me to this small farm in CT which had a few o the same fig trees growing on it.  From speaking with the owner, he was told by the original owner of the farm brought over fig tree cuttings from Italy circa 1890.  The fig trees are left every year untreated over the winter (zone 6b/7a).  They are heavily cut back every spring (hence the huge bush look).  What are they?!?

I harvested my sample fruit a little early (about a month ago).  However the fig still tasted wonderful.  It tasted a little fruity with a blend of strawberries and a light brown sugar / molasses, and a hint of floral smell (I suspect the floral smell came from an early harvest).  The fig tree also produces the famous "double fig" like the dall'osso fig tree, but these figs happen to taste good!  See Pic 4 below, the fig in the back.

What do you guys think this is?

Mother Tree:
1a. Mother trees - 20170906_132228.jpg 

One of the leaves:
2a. Leaf 1 - 20170906_132239.jpg 

Another leaf off the same tree:
3a. Leaf 2 - 20170906_132245.jpg 


Unpicked Fig Fruit.  The tree does produce quite a few of the double figs like the dall'osso.  Note the fig in the top of the photo.
4a. Figs - 20170906_132342.jpg 

One of the fruits picked a little early:
5a. Fig - 20170906_132329.jpg 


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fygmalion

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Reply with quote  #2 
It looks good.... Nice to find these old varieties... no clue as to what it might be . I wouldn't bother considering the double fig as anything more than an oddity. I have a 4 year old Vista loaded with figs at various stages and more than  a few are shaped exactly like the double fig pictures. Figs just do that every so often and if you have a prolific tree with lots of figs on it, you are very likely to see oddly shaped figs as well as these doubles scattered throughout.... Nice find and I hope someone can provide an id for you...
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Tony - Zone 6A
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Lewi

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Reply with quote  #3 
If you look up the name of the farm owner, you could then find what town he came from in the ellis Island database...will at least give you a region.

Let me know if you want to trade cuttings. :)

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West Florida / Panhandle (Central time). Can get cold for figs...down to 12 F twice in last five years. Zone 8a, not counting the recent "upgrade"

Lewi = Levite
tercio

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Reply with quote  #4 
Hey I'm also from Connecticut and would love to get some cuttings from this tree if you are able to (im willing to pay obviously). It'd be nice to know I would have a tree that is almost guaranteed to grow in my area (USDA says 7a, but who really knows).

In terms of identifying this fig, I can't really offer much of an answer because I am relatively new to this. I can say that seeing it was brought from Italy to Connecticut, it is probably some sort of Southern Italian variety (most Italians to US came from south). Also, seeing it survives our winters, it might be some sort of Mt. Etna variety? But I'm just speculating here, could be some rare Italian variety from another cold area for all we know!
leon_edmond

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Reply with quote  #5 
Nunuorig,
Can you be so kind to post more photos of the figs in terms of the outside of the fig, compared to a quarter or hand? It would help to identify them better. How large do these figs get in size? Is the tree productive? Thank you.
Brudd

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Reply with quote  #6 
I'm in CT too and would appreciate a few cuttings also.
 Any chance you could say what town its in? 
I just found one that has gone wild in New Haven, its in the back yard of a rental property, trying to get permission from the owner to take a few cuttings now.

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Mario_1

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Reply with quote  #7 
Didn't know there were so many fig enthusiasts in Ct.
I don't think any southern region in Italy would be zone 6 , not even the mountains. Maybe some of the mountains in Abbruzzi near Teramo and only at higher elevations .
At San Giacomo, Teramo elevation 1,106 meters above sea level the temperature this past winter was slightly warmer than Wallingford Ct zone 6b , a fig tree does survive there but like I said it's warmer than zone 6. There are higher mountains in the area but have not found any trees there yet. Further north in the Alps you would see zone 6 temperatures possibly at around 5 or 6 hundred meters, I will be testing one this winter, I will post if successful. Most immigrants from Italy around the turn of the century where from southern Italy. Good luck

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Wallingford CT, USA zone 6a would be happy to meet and get together with other members near me.
Wish list:Anything from higher mountains of italy
Mario_1

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Reply with quote  #8 
Didn't know there were so many fig enthusiasts in Ct.
I don't think any southern region in Italy would be zone 6 , not even the mountains. Maybe some of the mountains in Abbruzzi near Teramo and only at higher elevations .
At San Giacomo, Teramo elevation 1,106 meters above sea level the temperature this past winter was slightly warmer than Wallingford Ct zone 6b , a fig tree does survive there but like I said it's warmer than zone 6. There are higher mountains in the area but have not found any trees there yet. Further north in the Alps you would see zone 6 temperatures possibly at around 5 or 6 hundred meters, I will be testing one this winter, I will post if successful. Most immigrants from Italy around the turn of the century where from southern Italy. Good luck

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Wallingford CT, USA zone 6a would be happy to meet and get together with other members near me.
Wish list:Anything from higher mountains of italy
Mario_1

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Posts: 471
Reply with quote  #9 
Didn't know there were so many fig enthusiasts in Ct.
I don't think any southern region in Italy would be zone 6 , not even the mountains. Maybe some of the mountains in Abbruzzi near Teramo and only at higher elevations .
At San Giacomo, Teramo elevation 1,106 meters above sea level the temperature this past winter was slightly warmer than Wallingford Ct zone 6b , a fig tree does survive there but like I said it's warmer than zone 6. There are higher mountains in the area but have not found any trees there yet. Further north in the Alps you would see zone 6 temperatures possibly at around 5 or 6 hundred meters, I will be testing one this winter, I will post if successful. Most immigrants from Italy around the turn of the century where from southern Italy. Good luck

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Wallingford CT, USA zone 6a would be happy to meet and get together with other members near me.
Wish list:Anything from higher mountains of italy
Mario_1

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Posts: 471
Reply with quote  #10 
Didn't know there were so many fig enthusiasts in Ct.
I don't think any southern region in Italy would be zone 6 , not even the mountains. Maybe some of the mountains in Abbruzzi near Teramo and only at higher elevations .
At San Giacomo, Teramo elevation 1,106 meters above sea level the temperature this past winter was slightly warmer than Wallingford Ct zone 6b , a fig tree does survive there but like I said it's warmer than zone 6. There are higher mountains in the area but have not found any trees there yet. Further north in the Alps you would see zone 6 temperatures possibly at around 5 or 6 hundred meters, I will be testing one this winter, I will post if successful. Most immigrants from Italy around the turn of the century where from southern Italy. Good luck

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Wallingford CT, USA zone 6a would be happy to meet and get together with other members near me.
Wish list:Anything from higher mountains of italy
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