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FigTrees2013

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Reply with quote  #1 
Hi All, 
I am wondering how the fig season has compared for others. Here in Boston we were plagued by a late spring (The week before Memorial Day was still 40 degree temps), and a hot and overcast summer with lots of irregular temperature fluctuations. 

The fig season is very late -- luckily we are back up to 80 degree weather this week, but October is approaching fast, and we usually cover our trees by November. At best next week is supposed to be in the 70s. I'm considering throwing together a pvc and polycarb a hoop house for my in ground trees. Potted plants were less than ideal this year, but their figs did ripen fast. Have been giving the trees a lot of extra water to try to encourage the fruit to keep moving along. 

There are hundreds of figs that just need a few more weeks of heat! If only the weather would cooperate. 



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FigTrees2013

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FigTrees2013

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drewk

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Reply with quote  #4 
I have some space here if you want to bring them south for the fall to ripen!

How long have they been in that stage? Hopefully the warm weather this week will help them start to ripen!

The few figs I got have all ripened except for 1 that got a late start anyway. Its on a smaller tree that is an unknown so I am hoping that it will ripen so I may attempt to get an ID on it. I pull a lot of figlets off of my smaller trees hoping that they would grow more vigorously and do well next year.

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Nashville, TN - Zone 7

New collector, always looking for varieties that will do well here in ground or in pots.
Courtney

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Reply with quote  #5 
I'm near South shore, MA. I have no luck this year with figs. I had one HC almost ripe, and then something ate it!!!! I'll try again next year!!!
jrdewhirst

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Reply with quote  #6 
I'm in RI.  It's been a decent season overall.  

The start was very slow -- cold and wet.  But the summer was hot enough for good ripening on early and mid-season varieties.  

Re late varieties, I've harvested:

1.  A small number of Valle Negra and Nero 600 M, with more swelling and coloring.
2.  Only fig from an Adriatic type -- a JHA -- while I wait for many more (JHA, Gene's Paradiso, Vasilika Sika, Sumacki).
3.  Two figs from Black Weeping, but a hundred more are still coming.
3.  None yet from Laradek's EBT, whose main crop figs are hard and green.

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Joe D
Z6B - Bristol, RI
FigTrees2013

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Reply with quote  #7 
Quote:
Originally Posted by drewk
I have some space here if you want to bring them south for the fall to ripen!

How long have they been in that stage? Hopefully the warm weather this week will help them start to ripen!

The few figs I got have all ripened except for 1 that got a late start anyway. Its on a smaller tree that is an unknown so I am hoping that it will ripen so I may attempt to get an ID on it. I pull a lot of figlets off of my smaller trees hoping that they would grow more vigorously and do well next year.


Send some Southern September weather up this way! 

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FigTrees2013

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Reply with quote  #8 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrdewhirst
I'm in RI.  It's been a decent season overall.  

The start was very slow -- cold and wet.  But the summer was hot enough for good ripening on early and mid-season varieties.  

Re late varieties, I've harvested:

1.  A small number of Valle Negra and Nero 600 M, with more swelling and coloring.
2.  Only fig from an Adriatic type -- a JHA -- while I wait for many more (JHA, Gene's Paradiso, Vasilika Sika, Sumacki).
3.  Two figs from Black Weeping, but a hundred more are still coming.
3.  None yet from Laradek's EBT, whose main crop figs are hard and green.


Thanks for your reply. I have the same varieties both in pots and in the ground, and I've gotten dozens of figs from the potted plants, yet only about 20, if that, from 5 in-ground trees that each have over a hundred good sized figs on them. I suspect that having the potted trees in a greenhouse through early June really pushed them along. Let's hope we have an Indian summer to squeeze these late coming ones!

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jrdewhirst

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Reply with quote  #9 
Quote:
Originally Posted by FigTrees2013


Thanks for your reply. I have the same varieties both in pots and in the ground, and I've gotten dozens of figs from the potted plants, yet only about 20, if that, from 5 in-ground trees that each have over a hundred good sized figs on them. I suspect that having the potted trees in a greenhouse through early June really pushed them along. Let's hope we have an Indian summer to squeeze these late coming ones!


6 of 8 of my in-ground trees were badly damaged by voles last winter, so they aren't really representative.  Nevertheless, I've picked a few dozen figs from one undamaged lateral on the in-ground Florea.  Meanwhile, an unaffected young in-ground Sal's EL has ripened roughly a dozen with an equal number on the way.  The other unaffected in-ground Brooklyn White just started to ripen.

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Joe D
Z6B - Bristol, RI
DaveL

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Reply with quote  #10 
As stated by previous posters, this has been a difficult year to grow fig in New England. We had cold damp spring and unless you had a greenhouse, it resulted in trees breaking dormancy very late. For me a breba crop was almost non existent. This was due to two factors, the late spring and a little heavy pruning on my part last fall. In any event only one tree, an Olympian, produced two breba figs in early July.

My yard consists of very rocky, Sandy fill, there fore all my trees are in pots. I have six 25 gal SIPs and all but one, a tissue culture VDB, produced figs. They are Peters Honey, LSU Purple, Brown Turkey, Chicago Hardy, MBVS and RDB. Of these, the MBVS and RDB were the most prolific of the lot so far. There are still many figs on the trees that I am hold out hope for.

This past spring I up potted 25 third leaf trees from 5 gal pots to 15 gal pots. These,along with five 15 gal pots from the previous year,produced disappointing production results. Some trees produced figs and ejected them before thy could ripen while some did not produce any figs at all, even though the previous year in smaller pots they did. Several did, however, produce ripened figs in varying amounts, from one or two up to several. The producers were LSU Tiger, Dark Colsanti, Ischia, Sals Corleone, Red Sicilian, Bari, LDA, Neri2, and Lamperia Branca. The Lamperia was by far the best of this lot. These trees still have many figs that I hope still will ripen. I am hoping that some of the lack of production was due to the trees adjusting to the up potting done in the spring. Hopefully next year is more productive.

I also have about fourty trees that I started this past spring growing in their first leaf. They showed some amazing growth this year with many setting figs. Some large enough that with a little luck and heat they will ripen.

I currently have two 6x8 plastic greenhouses that I am using to extend the growing season on several promising trees. With a little luck the final outcome for this year might improve. I hope so. As I said many times, I am sure glad I grow figs as a hobby, I sure wouldn't want to grow them for a living. Thank you for all our farmers.

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Dave
Waterford, Ct. Zone 6B
FigTrees2013

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Posts: 90
Reply with quote  #11 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveL
As stated by previous posters, this has been a difficult year to grow fig in New England. We had cold damp spring and unless you had a greenhouse, it resulted in trees breaking dormancy very late. For me a breba crop was almost non existent. This was due to two factors, the late spring and a little heavy pruning on my part last fall. In any event only one tree, an Olympian, produced two breba figs in early July. My yard consists of very rocky, Sandy fill, there fore all my trees are in pots. I have six 25 gal SIPs and all but one, a tissue culture VDB, produced figs. They are Peters Honey, LSU Purple, Brown Turkey, Chicago Hardy, MBVS and RDB. Of these, the MBVS and RDB were the most prolific of the lot so far. There are still many figs on the trees that I am hold out hope for. This past spring I up potted 25 third leaf trees from 5 gal pots to 15 gal pots. These,along with five 15 gal pots from the previous year,produced disappointing production results. Some trees produced figs and ejected them before thy could ripen while some did not produce any figs at all, even though the previous year in smaller pots they did. Several did, however, produce ripened figs in varying amounts, from one or two up to several. The producers were LSU Tiger, Dark Colsanti, Ischia, Sals Corleone, Red Sicilian, Bari, LDA, Neri2, and Lamperia Branca. The Lamperia was by far the best of this lot. These trees still have many figs that I hope still will ripen. I am hoping that some of the lack of production was due to the trees adjusting to the up potting done in the spring. Hopefully next year is more productive. I also have about fourty trees that I started this past spring growing in their first leaf. They showed some amazing growth this year with many setting figs. Some large enough that with a little luck and heat they will ripen. I currently have two 6x8 plastic greenhouses that I am using to extend the growing season on several promising trees. With a little luck the final outcome for this year might improve. I hope so. As I said many times, I am sure glad I grow figs as a hobby, I sure wouldn't want to grow them for a living. Thank you for all our farmers.


I certainly agree that I wouldn't want to grow them for a living. Thank you for your detailed response. I am tempted to throw up a hoop house to try to stretch the season a bit longer. The 85 degree temp today has hopefully helped a lot. Even though I break the tips on my in ground trees after they put out a foot of growth, the season just isn't long enough here!

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