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tonytran

Registered:
Posts: 37
Reply with quote  #51 
WFF,

You can also try to Winter protection for your figs like what I did for my Asian persimmon in Z5. Take some ropes and tied the branches together and wrapped with a large tarp or any tarps from home depot and hang a light bulb in the center of the tree. Turn the light on when the temp dip below 20 degrees for figs and -4F for Asian Persimmons. Shut off the light bulb with the temp reach above the critical temp during the day and so on....


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[8097961265_600f80862c_m]

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[8097962125_1157937b21_m]

Tony


WaitingforFigot

Registered:
Posts: 16
Reply with quote  #52 
Tony,

Do I have to worry about moisture/mold wrapped in a tarp since mine are so small in height (12-16")? Is the plastic tarp touching your branches?

Right now, my main ideas are:

-tying them each up and putting an overturned plastic planting pot over a couple.

-adding some extra stones to the top of soil for warmth

-laying out some X-mas rope light on soil when extremely cold; but it will be a good 30-40 ft from electrical outlet

-cleaning out trash recycling bin and throwing it over all 4 plants (plus my Arp Rosemary)

-cutting some pvc for a "cage" and throwing some tarp over it, then securing with stones from wind-sailing away

Thanks,
WFF

__________________
Zone 6. NorthEast
Chicago, Violette de Bordeaux, White Marseilles, Olympian
Wish List - ????
tonytran

Registered:
Posts: 37
Reply with quote  #53 
WFF,

So far no issue with molds for me in the last 10 years. Since your figs tree are small, you can take a small cardboard box or an open home depot 5 gallons bucket or a pot and place over each of your fig tree and fill it with the regular soil all the way to the top and close the lop of the box and wrap it with a water proof tarp and that should be enough for the small fig trees. You can remove the bucket and the soil when there is no more hard frost. You can also use the hose to blast away the soil to the original growing level.  You can try the other method when your fig trees are bigger.

Tony

Here is my Ichi Kei Ki Jiro Asian Persimmon.
[home-design]


[279827f8093ed0f6a6d0c65e50dc568af8cfbe0c_1_690x387]




[2acdf49a7f070f5d965e0720fb97a4128896d05e_1_690x387]


Nikita's Gift Hybrid persimmon. Asian crossed with American Persimmon.


[home-design]



fygmalion

Avatar / Picture

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Posts: 104
Reply with quote  #54 
Nice work, Tony! Looks to be very effective protection for your orchard...
__________________
Tony - Zone 6A
WL- Martina, Calderona, BonJesusa, SantMartina, Bordissot Negra Rimada, Fiorone Oro, Renyeca, Mata Soldats, Craven's Craving, Popone, Fracazzano Multicolore, Rigato del Salento
WaitingforFigot

Registered:
Posts: 16
Reply with quote  #55 
Tony,

I didn't know I could cover them completely with soil - I guess I dumbly thought they would sprout roots like a layer. This sounds like a plan!

Your photos are great - I have never eaten a persimmon or pawpaw but I want to now. LOL. I think you posted jujubes also which I've never seen.

I was considering some hazelnut bushes at one point, but decided they might attract squirrels. I have enough to worry about with all the birds and neighbors with bird feeders. Do your figs have bird problems?

Thanks,
WFF

__________________
Zone 6. NorthEast
Chicago, Violette de Bordeaux, White Marseilles, Olympian
Wish List - ????
tonytran

Registered:
Posts: 37
Reply with quote  #56 
WFF,

The figs won't root in late fall because they are ready to go into dormant and you remove the soil in the Spring. No bird issue yet. I have friends had big problem with SWD.

Tony

Spotted Wing Drosophila: Small Fly – Big Problem

(Photo Credit: Elizabeth Beers, Washington State University)(Photo Credit: Elizabeth Beers, Washington State University)

It’s just a fruit fly, for crying out loud. As kids we’d see their like hovering over the family fruit bowl and shoo them away without a thought. But spotted wing drosophila (SWD), Drosophila suzukii, is so much more than that.

Though small like their nonthreatening drosophila relatives — adults are only about 1/16 to 1/8 inch long — it’s the black spot towards the tip of each male’s wing, which earns them the spotted wing moniker.

The other names they are called by fed-up growers — the names that can’t be printed in a respectable magazine — come from an attribute of the females. It is a very prominent, saw-like ovipositor for laying eggs in fruit.

It’s that devastating characteristic that has garnered the SWD a reputation in virtually all of the country’s fruit production areas in just six seasons. It was first found in 2008 damaging fruit in California, and has since spread throughout the U.S.

SWD was originally best known for infesting ripening cherries — though fruit doesn’t have to be over-ripe, green under-ripe fruit don’t do anything for it — but has since become most notorious for attacking berries, especially raspberry, blackberry, blueberry and strawberry crops.

While diverse geographically, SWD was found to have some common characteristics by American Fruit Grower® and Western Fruit Grower™ magazines in a survey of university entomologists from around the country. Here’s a quick rundown.

Be Prepared
Almost all of the entomologists said growers of at-risk fruit can expect to see SWD about a month after temperatures start rising in late spring.

“Keep an eye on it. The best way to know if it’s active in your area is to have traps out in your orchard,” says Elizabeth Beers, Washington State University Professor of Entomology. “WSU has no official recommendation as to how many, but if I had a 10-acre block I wouldn’t want less than 4.”

Keep On Top
When asked what one piece of advice they would give to growers, virtually every pest expert said to be ready, and don’t wait to act.

“Don’t let it get out of control, when the numbers are low you can handle it,” says Mark Bolda, University of California Cooperative Extension Farm Advisor, Strawberries & Caneberries. “But when the numbers are big, you’ve got trouble. And populations can build really fast.”

Pesticides
In virtually all parts of the country, conventional growers are rotating sprays of organophosphates such as malathion, pyrethroids, and spinosad. For organic growers, they just have the one spinosad, Entrust from Dow AgroSciences.

(Photo Credit: Elizabeth Beers, Washington State University)(Photo Credit: Elizabeth Beers, Washington State University)

“Once it’s established in an area, most growers use an aggressive regime,” says Greg Loeb, Cornell University Professor of Entomology. “Spray once every seven days, no more than two consecutive weeks with the same class. Some are more aggressive than every seven days, but that’s depending on the label, too.”

Kelly Hamby, University of Maryland Assistant Professor/Extension Specialist, notes that perhaps some day SWD will be controlled with a parasitic wasp as it is where it came from, in Asia.
“But that will be many years down the line,” she said. “Until then, we are worried about drosophila.”

Cultural Practices
Most researchers say that cultural practices only go so far with SWD, but sanitation and keeping an open canopy for better airflow and more sunshine is crucial.

“We learned that last year, despite the best intentions, you have to make sure to keep the fields clean,” says Hannah Burrack, North Carolina State University Associated Professor and Extension Specialist.

Also, the flies like a nice shaded hangout to spend time in. Really, you’re not going to be able to control the pest with cultural practices alone. On the flip side, you won’t be able to control them with pesticides if you don’t have the cultural practices.”

Pick That Fruit
Perhaps no practice is more important than getting your fruit harvested as rapidly as possible, says Rufus Isaacs, Professor & Extension Specialist in Dept. of Entomology, Michigan State University.

“The longer you leave ripe, or even worse, over-ripe fruit out there, the more trouble you will have with Spotted Wing Drosophila,” he says. “Rapid picking is really useful. It’s not always practical, but think about how you can do it.”

tonytran

Registered:
Posts: 37
Reply with quote  #57 
WFF,

The figs won't root in late fall because they are ready to go into dormant and you remove the soil in the Spring. No bird issue yet. I have friends had big problem with SWD.

Tony

Spotted Wing Drosophila: Small Fly – Big Problem

(Photo Credit: Elizabeth Beers, Washington State University)(Photo Credit: Elizabeth Beers, Washington State University)

It’s just a fruit fly, for crying out loud. As kids we’d see their like hovering over the family fruit bowl and shoo them away without a thought. But spotted wing drosophila (SWD), Drosophila suzukii, is so much more than that.

Though small like their nonthreatening drosophila relatives — adults are only about 1/16 to 1/8 inch long — it’s the black spot towards the tip of each male’s wing, which earns them the spotted wing moniker.

The other names they are called by fed-up growers — the names that can’t be printed in a respectable magazine — come from an attribute of the females. It is a very prominent, saw-like ovipositor for laying eggs in fruit.

It’s that devastating characteristic that has garnered the SWD a reputation in virtually all of the country’s fruit production areas in just six seasons. It was first found in 2008 damaging fruit in California, and has since spread throughout the U.S.

SWD was originally best known for infesting ripening cherries — though fruit doesn’t have to be over-ripe, green under-ripe fruit don’t do anything for it — but has since become most notorious for attacking berries, especially raspberry, blackberry, blueberry and strawberry crops.

While diverse geographically, SWD was found to have some common characteristics by American Fruit Grower® and Western Fruit Grower™ magazines in a survey of university entomologists from around the country. Here’s a quick rundown.

Be Prepared
Almost all of the entomologists said growers of at-risk fruit can expect to see SWD about a month after temperatures start rising in late spring.

“Keep an eye on it. The best way to know if it’s active in your area is to have traps out in your orchard,” says Elizabeth Beers, Washington State University Professor of Entomology. “WSU has no official recommendation as to how many, but if I had a 10-acre block I wouldn’t want less than 4.”

Keep On Top
When asked what one piece of advice they would give to growers, virtually every pest expert said to be ready, and don’t wait to act.

“Don’t let it get out of control, when the numbers are low you can handle it,” says Mark Bolda, University of California Cooperative Extension Farm Advisor, Strawberries & Caneberries. “But when the numbers are big, you’ve got trouble. And populations can build really fast.”

Pesticides
In virtually all parts of the country, conventional growers are rotating sprays of organophosphates such as malathion, pyrethroids, and spinosad. For organic growers, they just have the one spinosad, Entrust from Dow AgroSciences.

(Photo Credit: Elizabeth Beers, Washington State University)(Photo Credit: Elizabeth Beers, Washington State University)

“Once it’s established in an area, most growers use an aggressive regime,” says Greg Loeb, Cornell University Professor of Entomology. “Spray once every seven days, no more than two consecutive weeks with the same class. Some are more aggressive than every seven days, but that’s depending on the label, too.”

Kelly Hamby, University of Maryland Assistant Professor/Extension Specialist, notes that perhaps some day SWD will be controlled with a parasitic wasp as it is where it came from, in Asia.
“But that will be many years down the line,” she said. “Until then, we are worried about drosophila.”

Cultural Practices
Most researchers say that cultural practices only go so far with SWD, but sanitation and keeping an open canopy for better airflow and more sunshine is crucial.

“We learned that last year, despite the best intentions, you have to make sure to keep the fields clean,” says Hannah Burrack, North Carolina State University Associated Professor and Extension Specialist.

Also, the flies like a nice shaded hangout to spend time in. Really, you’re not going to be able to control the pest with cultural practices alone. On the flip side, you won’t be able to control them with pesticides if you don’t have the cultural practices.”

Pick That Fruit
Perhaps no practice is more important than getting your fruit harvested as rapidly as possible, says Rufus Isaacs, Professor & Extension Specialist in Dept. of Entomology, Michigan State University.

“The longer you leave ripe, or even worse, over-ripe fruit out there, the more trouble you will have with Spotted Wing Drosophila,” he says. “Rapid picking is really useful. It’s not always practical, but think about how you can do it.”

WaitingforFigot

Registered:
Posts: 16
Reply with quote  #58 
Tony,

I'll definitely keep an eye out for SWD. It seems they also like strawberries - which I planted for the first time ever, around the fig trees. LOL.

Luckily I've got full sun for my raised beds.

I also plan on getting some organza bags that others have used. I will hang myself if I have figs next year and the birds get them. I've seen as many as 30 on my fence.

__________________
Zone 6. NorthEast
Chicago, Violette de Bordeaux, White Marseilles, Olympian
Wish List - ????
tonytran

Registered:
Posts: 37
Reply with quote  #59 
WFF,

I do grow several Brand name mulberries at the far end of my property line to distract the birds so they will leave my fruit trees alone. I have Gerardi, Kokuso, Illinois ever bearing, and Oscar. They all are very tasty and the birds loved them and leave my fruits alone.LOL.

Tony
WaitingforFigot

Registered:
Posts: 16
Reply with quote  #60 
Tony,

I have a very small patch of blackberries that the birds eat which I keep at the end yard. I'm hoping that they stay distracted with them, but the blackberries ripen at the end of July so it probably won't overlap with the figs. The birds also love to plant their asses on my grapevines and relax - but I've never noticed any damage to the grapes.

In the middle of the blackberries and grapes are the figs along with newly planted strawberries - this will be my battlefield next year (I hope I am mistaken but I doubt it) because it seems that 90% of people said that birds DEVOUR their figs and strawberries. Since I don't have a large property, the fruits will be relatively close to each other.

At one point I had a dwarf cherry tree, blueberry bushes, and a raspberry - birds ate everything. Did netting one year, but plants were still small and birds still snagged the fruit.

My neighbors have manicured lawns and bird feeders. My yard is like Disneyland for the birds.

WFF

__________________
Zone 6. NorthEast
Chicago, Violette de Bordeaux, White Marseilles, Olympian
Wish List - ????
tonytran

Registered:
Posts: 37
Reply with quote  #61 
WFF,

You can also use the American netting.

https://www.americannettings.com/

Tony
WaitingforFigot

Registered:
Posts: 16
Reply with quote  #62 
Tony,

Looks like that website has a lot of good stuff - I'll check it out more thoroughly later.

I'm going to have to cover the strawberries but don't care for the idea of netting on them. Since they are in raised beds (woo-hoo!) I'm thinking of a half moon of hardware cloth to lay over them - they are planted along the edges, so no worry about the middles yet.

Do you have grapes? You have so many fruits that it's hard to imagine you without some. I'm really excited for next year/2nd year. I have a red seed grape that is a beast and tolerates abuse but the taste is good, not great. I tend to favor the black/blue grapes and bought this little guy a couple of months ago - Joy Seedless Black. Fingers crossed for over-wintering but it looks and sounds delicious:

http://https://www.starkbros.com/products/berry-plants/grape-vines/joy-grape

WFF

__________________
Zone 6. NorthEast
Chicago, Violette de Bordeaux, White Marseilles, Olympian
Wish List - ????
tonytran

Registered:
Posts: 37
Reply with quote  #63 
WFF,

Swenson Red is a easy to grow and super sweet grape but it is seeded. The newer good tasting grapes that lots of people are growing: Hope, Faith, Gratitude, and Joy. I also have one called Tickled me pink.

Tony
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