Register  |   | 
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment   Page 2 of 3      Prev   1   2   3   Next
HarveyC

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 3,318
Reply with quote  #51 
Hi Zach.  I'm not doing anything other than the initial wrap of BuddyTape (Parafilm).  My air is probably at 20% RH, I'd guess.

Although I've not had an issue with the dreaded fungus gnats, I thought by switching to some form of bottom watering would help ensure against that.

__________________

Harvey - Correia Farms
Isleton, CA (Sacramento County) USDA zone 9b, Sunset zone 14

http://www.figaholics.com
https://www.facebook.com/Figaholics
ztfree1128

Registered:
Posts: 221
Reply with quote  #52 
Ok thanks Harvey, I haven't tried the buddytape- I will have to try that and see if it helps. I ordered some tree pots today and I am going to try this with some cuttings.
__________________
Zach
Baltimore, MD
Zone 7a
RichinNJ

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 1,687
Reply with quote  #53 

 

From and Orchid website....

BTI - Bacillus thuringiensis subspecies Israelensis

There is a naturally occurring soil bacterium called Bacillus thuringiensis subspecies Israelensis (BTI) that kills the larvae of fungus gnats, mosquitoes and black flies . When BTI is eaten by these larvae toxins are released into their gut which causes the larvae to stop eating. Without food the larvae die. This interrupts the life cycle of these pests and the population then dies off.

BTI is not harmful to humans, birds, fish or mammals. Deemed Fit For Organic production by the USEPA in accordance with the USDA's National Organic Program.

  • You can get BTI in "Mosquito Dunks" and use it in your watering can. They sell them at Home Depot and Lowes.
  • "Yellow Sticky Traps" are supposed to work well also on the adults
ztfree1128

Registered:
Posts: 221
Reply with quote  #54 
Has anyone tried this type of method but instead of using promix, use loose coir?
__________________
Zach
Baltimore, MD
Zone 7a
ascpete

Registered:
Posts: 1,942
Reply with quote  #55 
Zack,
I tried Burpee Coir Seed Starting mix last year and it was successful. I also did a 70-30 Coir-Perlite mix and that worked quite well (very high rooting rate with very healthy looking roots). That's what I'm planning to use in my mini SIPs this season for rooting cuttings, a Coir-Peat-Perlite mix. The coir product is sometimes called "Coir Fines". I was also able to purchase larger bricks to make my own mix. My experience of rooting with Coir was documented here starting with post # 57... http://figs4funforum.websitetoolbox.com/post/fig-rooting-hormone-and-none-a-comparison-6155695__trail_100

<edit>
Pete,
I actually pre-wet the cutting rooting mix with MG general Purpose Fertilizer at 1 teaspoon/gallon of water, after noticing that all the seed starting mixes have a low fertilizer content. It definitely has not harmed the cuttings.
ztfree1128

Registered:
Posts: 221
Reply with quote  #56 
Thanks Pete, thats really helpful, I am thinking about doing the same and trying it in the tree pots this year
__________________
Zach
Baltimore, MD
Zone 7a
bullet08

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 6,911
Reply with quote  #57 
last 3 yrs, i have been using MG seedling soil, and medium perlite at 50/50. seems to work just fine. and same mix is used for 1 gal. used to use MG perlite too. but they have too much fine powder. changed to one of those large bulk package perlite from one of organic/brewing shop around here. 

i think this goes back to jon's new baggie method. using something other than just water and paper towel/s. moss seems to get the root going faster. i know MG products come with fertilizers in them. there was another post about growing cutting in the water with fertilizer in it. maybe something we are missing about fertilizer and the cuttings. maybe at low level, fertilizer might actually help and doesn't burn up the cutting. 

i've been bottom feeding fertilizer at very low dose on my cups for last few weeks. it seems they are very happy. 

__________________
Pete
Durham, NC
Zone 7b

"don't talk to me about naval tradition. It's nothing but rum, sodomy and the lash." - sir winston churchill
"the problem with socialism is that eventually you run out of other people's money." - the baroness thatcher

***** all my figs have FMV/FMD, in case you're wondering. *****
***** and... i don't sell things. what little i have will be posted here in winter for first come first serve base to be shared. no, i'm not a socialist...*****
recomer20

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 402
Reply with quote  #58 
Where do you get your ProMix HP, Harvey? Is it available in local stores for home gardeners? I usually only see JungleGrow and MG in the local stores.


__________________
Rick C. Birmingham, AL z7b --- *INGROUND: S.C.Lemon ("Dr.Welch"), LSUpurple, Celeste (Std) *POTTED 3rd Yr: Alma, Atreano, BattGreen, GrnGreek, HardyChicago, ItalianBlack (Becnel), LSUGold?, MBvs, Sal's EL, Southern BT?, St.Jean, Jackie'sUnk *POTTED 2nd Yr: SunbirdUnkJP, BourjNoire, JHAdriatic, ValleNegra *ROOTING: RdB, ScottsBlk, BlkGreek-MN,Preto

HarveyC

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 3,318
Reply with quote  #59 
Rick, I've bought a smaller bale at Lowe's before but then I bought a larger one at a very large soil mixing plant in Sacramento.

Redi Gro: http://tinyurl.com/RediGro

__________________

Harvey - Correia Farms
Isleton, CA (Sacramento County) USDA zone 9b, Sunset zone 14

http://www.figaholics.com
https://www.facebook.com/Figaholics
newnandawg

Registered:
Posts: 2,532
Reply with quote  #60 
Rick, If you get over to Atlanta area you can pick it up at Atlantis Hydroponics or on their website http://www.atlantishydroponics.com/
recomer20

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 402
Reply with quote  #61 
Thanks for the info, Harvey and Mike. Right now I'm mixing MG potting mix, yard dirt, and perlite in haphazard ratios until it 'feels right'...not that I know what right should feel like :) Would be nicer though just to find a trusted pre-mix. "Trial and error" is fun when you have plenty of free-time, but I'm working 6 days a week now so convenience and reliability have become much more appealing. I've had issues with Coir-based seed starter...either it would hold NO moisture, or once finally saturated, would never dry out. Actually found Alabama yard dirt to be a fairly good moisture balancer---just have to add the others to keep it from compacting. Though there's that issue of bugs/gnats or whatever issues outdoor soil might bring inside with it. 
__________________
Rick C. Birmingham, AL z7b --- *INGROUND: S.C.Lemon ("Dr.Welch"), LSUpurple, Celeste (Std) *POTTED 3rd Yr: Alma, Atreano, BattGreen, GrnGreek, HardyChicago, ItalianBlack (Becnel), LSUGold?, MBvs, Sal's EL, Southern BT?, St.Jean, Jackie'sUnk *POTTED 2nd Yr: SunbirdUnkJP, BourjNoire, JHAdriatic, ValleNegra *ROOTING: RdB, ScottsBlk, BlkGreek-MN,Preto

ascpete

Registered:
Posts: 1,942
Reply with quote  #62 
Rick,
Promix-HP...
Quote:
Canadian Sphagnum Peat Moss
(65-75% by volume)
If you use 3 parts of any good quality Potting Mix to 1 part Perlite (sifted to remove fines) you will have a similar mix ratio, minus the Mycorrhizae.
paully22

Registered:
Posts: 2,812
Reply with quote  #63 
Had bad luck with Promix indoors. Worst is MG potting soil. Big problems with fungus gnats. Maybe it
is just my luck.

I find Sequioa taste too ordinary. Maybe this is due to its young age & I kept it in the green house.
HarveyC

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 3,318
Reply with quote  #64 
Pete, here is my first existing pot on it's way to a SIP.

I cut a strip 7" long and folder it 1" over and stapled it and inserted a dried up pomegranate cutting to aid inserting it into a pot already containing ProMix and a rooted cutting:

[IMAG0802] 

The first one went in pretty easy, see the wicking material that made it to the bottom of the pot:

[IMAG0804]

I inserted a second one into the same pot but am not sure it made it all the way to the bottom.  It felt like it hung up on some roots.  I think I need a different stick that is smoother and less likely to tear through the bottom of the wick.


__________________

Harvey - Correia Farms
Isleton, CA (Sacramento County) USDA zone 9b, Sunset zone 14

http://www.figaholics.com
https://www.facebook.com/Figaholics
ascpete

Registered:
Posts: 1,942
Reply with quote  #65 
Harvey,
Thanks for the update.
I don't know how you could apply this to mass production, but its an easy way to determine the the maximum required amount of water for your SIPs. IMO, your idea of flood and drain may be the best approach for large quantities of cuttings in standardized planters.
HarveyC

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 3,318
Reply with quote  #66 
Thanks, Pete, I was thinking along the lines of something such as that.  When I irrigate my chestnut orchard (main orchard is 226 large trees, irrigated with microsprinklers), I have based the amount of water on the existing moisture of the soil.  For instance, if soil has become more dry than I plan due to a vacation, I might want to apply 6" of water to replace 1/3 of soil space down to 18" in depth, figuring 7.5 gallons per cubic foot, and applying 125 GPM, I determine the hours I need to run my system.  It's going to take some trial and error on this but I'll probably only apply enough water to replace 20% of pot volume on my first run.  One concern I have is that some pots will be drier than others but I'm also hoping that those pots will wick up the water faster.

I attempted to find trays I could use, ideally something 15" x 25.5" so I could fit two trays of pots in each tray for watering or 25.5" x 45-48" for six trays (one shelf).  I could maybe do that by constructing something out of metal and soldering the corners, etc., but that got to be more work and pricey.  Yesterday I bought a 10' x 25' roll of 6 mil black plastic and will use that to form a basin under my trays and see how that works.

Late last night I also experimented and think I'll melt the folded seam of the wick instead of stapling.

__________________

Harvey - Correia Farms
Isleton, CA (Sacramento County) USDA zone 9b, Sunset zone 14

http://www.figaholics.com
https://www.facebook.com/Figaholics
HarveyC

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 3,318
Reply with quote  #67 
I ran out of ProMix HP when I started a tray back in mid-January and used the Sunshine mix.  I don't think I'll use that any longer for starting cuttings.  It stays wetter and I seem to have started getting some fungus gnats about 10 days after starting that tray.

I just started another tray of cuttings (mostly cuttings that are a little bit immature and more green than I'd like).  I bought more ProMix HP last week so I'm set to go (cost was about $32 for 3.8 cubic feet weighing 60 pounds).  Here is a photo of the new tray along with a tray of cuttings that I started on 12/8/2013 which was shown previously in this thread.  One cutting appears lost but the other 19 are doing great.

[image] 

I attempted to convert some of these to SIP but it was too difficult with plants that are already so far along.  Instead, I'm picking the entire tray up and putting the tray in a tub of water that is about 4" deep and soaking them for about 5 minutes. That seems to be doing well.

__________________

Harvey - Correia Farms
Isleton, CA (Sacramento County) USDA zone 9b, Sunset zone 14

http://www.figaholics.com
https://www.facebook.com/Figaholics
ztfree1128

Registered:
Posts: 221
Reply with quote  #68 
Thanks for sharing the picture they look great. How often are you doing the water then from the bottom treatment? I started some cuttings yesterday using what you did and I also started a few with a mix of coir and perlite.
__________________
Zach
Baltimore, MD
Zone 7a
newnandawg

Registered:
Posts: 2,532
Reply with quote  #69 
Looking good Harvey!
GreenFin

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 707
Reply with quote  #70 
Yeah, those plants look great Harvey, well done sir.
__________________
James, zone 6a Kansas (zone 10 greenhouses); wish list is in my profile
http://www.FigCuttings.com

rcantor

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 5,851
Reply with quote  #71 
The promix HP is drying out too fast for me so I'm mixing it with ~5% small pine bark chunks and ~3% Napa Floor Dry.  So far so good.  I have my indoor green house fairly warm.  Everything seems to stall if I don't heat it.
__________________
Zone 6, MO

Wish list:
Martineca Rimada, Galicia Negra, Fioroni Ruvo, De La Reina - Pons, Tauro, BFF, Sefrawi, Sbayi, Mavra Sika , Fillaciano Bianco, Corynth, Souadi, Acciano Purple, LSU Tiger, LSU Red, Cajun Gold, BB-10 any great tasting fig
HarveyC

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 3,318
Reply with quote  #72 
Thanks for the kind comments.

The plants at this stage have been getting watered once every two days, soaking for about 10 minutes.  But this morning they were a little bit more dried out than I liked so I think I'll need to go to about every 36 hours.  I plan to sell some of these and was hoping to keep them in small pots to make it easier to ship but may move them up into a larger size.  I don't like the results from 1 gallon pots being shipped much of the time so will probably stick with tree pots.

__________________

Harvey - Correia Farms
Isleton, CA (Sacramento County) USDA zone 9b, Sunset zone 14

http://www.figaholics.com
https://www.facebook.com/Figaholics
cis4elk

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 1,761
Reply with quote  #73 
Great job Harvey! They look very good.
__________________
Calvin Littleton,CO z5/6
Wants List: For everyone to clean-up after themselves and co-exist peacefully. Let's think more about the future of our planet and less about ourselves.  :)
ascpete

Registered:
Posts: 1,942
Reply with quote  #74 
Harvey,
Thanks for the update.
What's your current fertilizing schedule? The plants look good.
Thanks.
Bosco

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 211
Reply with quote  #75 

Harvey……. Thanks for all the progress reports on your original post.   A super discussion you have initiated!

I’m curious, are you applying any water soluble fertilizer or any other additives in your watering or soaks?  If so, what kind, how much?    Thanks


__________________
Jack
San Diego, North County Coastal
Zone 9A
Wish List for 2015: Black Madeira, Col de Dame Blanc. Noir and Gris,
HarveyC

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 3,318
Reply with quote  #76 
Pete and Jack, no fertilizer used yet but I may start this week.  I actually would prefer for them to slow down a bit.  It's cooler in my greenhouse but very crowded in their with larger fig trees and 100 seedling white sapote and dragon fruit and etc.!

I was thinking of using a water soluble fertilizer today but I'm using the same tub of water for cuttings that are at a much later stage and I don't want to be fertilizing them yet.  I suppose I could store leftover water in a bucket until I need it again.

__________________

Harvey - Correia Farms
Isleton, CA (Sacramento County) USDA zone 9b, Sunset zone 14

http://www.figaholics.com
https://www.facebook.com/Figaholics
milehighgirl

Registered:
Posts: 284
Reply with quote  #77 
Harvey, You are lucky to have found those pots! I bought a hundred or so a few years ago but without the trays they were really not convenient (They weren't available in small quantities then). I just want to mention that the tree pots don't stand up well to UV rays. Unless they have changed them in the last few years they will only hold up well for one year out in the sun. I don't know about grow lights, however. I got mine from Peaceful Valley.
__________________
USDA Zone 5b, Sunset 2b

Looking for: Becane, Dalmatie, Doree, Florea, Hanc's EBT, Italian 258, LaRadek's EBT, Longue d'Aout, Marseilles White , Negronne, Nordland, Sal's EL, Strawberry Vert, ...anything cold hardy and short season. (Willing to pay for cuttings)
HarveyC

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 3,318
Reply with quote  #78 
I have some of the larger tree pots which I've are a few years old.  These smaller 3" x 8" pots probably won't spend much time out in the sun, if any.  The trees will either get sold and shipped off in these pots or moved into larger pots before planting in my orchard.  I've bought the larger tree pots from http://www.stuewe.com/ in the past, maybe 100-200 at a time (for chestnuts, originally).
__________________

Harvey - Correia Farms
Isleton, CA (Sacramento County) USDA zone 9b, Sunset zone 14

http://www.figaholics.com
https://www.facebook.com/Figaholics
Rewton

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 2,031
Reply with quote  #79 
Harvey, I wanted to re-visit this thread to ask the same question as Zach i.e. did you do anything to keep the humidity up or just go with ambient humidity?  Any idea how humid the environment was around the cuttings?

Edit: oops just now realized this thread went on to two pages and my question has already been answered!

__________________
Steve MD zone 7a

HarveyC

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 3,318
Reply with quote  #80 
Glad I could help, Steve. ;)

For some reason, it seems that very fat cuttings have the lowest success rate for me.  I don't know if the method I'm using has any bearing on that or not.  Overall, I like this method very much and will continue using it.  I am also using it for mulberries and pomegranates (use Dip N Grow hormone for poms, mixed with 5 parts water).

__________________

Harvey - Correia Farms
Isleton, CA (Sacramento County) USDA zone 9b, Sunset zone 14

http://www.figaholics.com
https://www.facebook.com/Figaholics
Rewton

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 2,031
Reply with quote  #81 
Do you think there is much of an advantage in using rooting hormone for figs using your method, Harvey?  Re. humidity, I will probably keep the containers in a humidity bin in the shade outdoors with the lid propped open a bit.  I won't have water in the bottom so it will probably increase humidity only slightly above the already relatively humid Maryland air.  The main purpose of the humidity bin would be to prevent rain from falling on the cuttings and saturating the soil.
__________________
Steve MD zone 7a

HarveyC

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 3,318
Reply with quote  #82 
Steve, last year Pete (ascpete) did an experiment an cuttings without rooting hormone did better.  Although his samples with rooting hormone were probably at excessively high levels of hormone, my own experience with lower levels showed much of the same thing: cuttings with rooting hormone developed roots more quickly but were slow to push out leaves.  Someone posted a link in his thread (if I remember correctly) to a report on roses in which it indicated that IBA (the primary rooting hormone, though Dip N Grow also uses NAA) inhibits bud break.  In early 2013 I had many cuttings with a lot of roots in 10 days or so but failed to grow very well and many died.  My success rate with no rooting hormone is much better.  Figs root so easily without rooting hormone that there doesn't really seem to be any justification to use it.

Pomegranates don't root as easily and rooting hormone is beneficial.  Pom cuttings always leaf out before they have roots.

__________________

Harvey - Correia Farms
Isleton, CA (Sacramento County) USDA zone 9b, Sunset zone 14

http://www.figaholics.com
https://www.facebook.com/Figaholics
rcantor

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 5,851
Reply with quote  #83 
Can't argue with your success rate.  Your plants are beautiful.  If you don't like fat cuttings feel free to send them to me!  Those root the best for me.  I have trouble with the ones ~ 1/8".  Once they get bigger than 3/16" I do OK with them.
__________________
Zone 6, MO

Wish list:
Martineca Rimada, Galicia Negra, Fioroni Ruvo, De La Reina - Pons, Tauro, BFF, Sefrawi, Sbayi, Mavra Sika , Fillaciano Bianco, Corynth, Souadi, Acciano Purple, LSU Tiger, LSU Red, Cajun Gold, BB-10 any great tasting fig
HarveyC

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 3,318
Reply with quote  #84 
Bob, when I say "fat" I mean like 3/4" to 1".  I don't have any left at this point, they were mostly ones I bought from others.  I guess if I was to pick a typical "perfect" size I would like 3/8" to 7/16" in diameter. Every cutting should have 3 buds with the top two buds being nice and plump.  Cuttings should be cut 1/4" below the bottom bud and about 1/4" above the top bud (angled at the top).  Most cuttings are not "perfect"!

I received a good number of green fig cuttings this spring and, after removing leaves, prepared them the same way as I have dormant cuttings and success rates for those so far appear to be over 90%.  Overall, the quality of the cuttings was better than what I worked with earlier in the year.

__________________

Harvey - Correia Farms
Isleton, CA (Sacramento County) USDA zone 9b, Sunset zone 14

http://www.figaholics.com
https://www.facebook.com/Figaholics
rcantor

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 5,851
Reply with quote  #85 
I've rooted 2-3" cuttings with great success.  3/4 - 1 1/2 are great!
__________________
Zone 6, MO

Wish list:
Martineca Rimada, Galicia Negra, Fioroni Ruvo, De La Reina - Pons, Tauro, BFF, Sefrawi, Sbayi, Mavra Sika , Fillaciano Bianco, Corynth, Souadi, Acciano Purple, LSU Tiger, LSU Red, Cajun Gold, BB-10 any great tasting fig
tamarness

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 131
Reply with quote  #86 
Mike, thank you so much for the head's up on Atlantis Hydroponics! There's one barely 10 miles from my house, and I was able to snag their last bale of Pro-Mix HP earlier today.
__________________
-- Tamar

Atlanta, GA

Attempting to grow: LSU Purple, Genoa White Honey, Kadota, Alma, Lyndhurst White, Adriatic JH, Desert King, Sal's, Salem Dark, Improved Celeste, Celeste, Marylane Seedless, Panachee, Marseilles Black VS, Sal's Corleone, Kalamata, 135-15s, Negronne, White Marseilles, Beer's Black, Norella, Monstrueuse, unknown cultivars... yeah, the list is too long to update anymore.
Bosco

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 211
Reply with quote  #87 

Harvey …… I enjoyed your original post and discussion so much; I had to give it try.  

The tree pots, where found on eBay at a reasonable price ….. here.   I tried ProMix HP and Sunshine #4 in various trials and to each added more perlite.   Maybe too much!  No greenhouse, so I cut 1.5 liter “FIJI” water bottles in half to help with humidity.  They fit snuggly and some I cut vent holes in top but, then abandon in an attempt to keep gnats at bay.    Also, had pots on heat pad with tray between, approx. 75 deg. in mix!  

All in all, think my success rate in rooting is about 50%.    Keeping uniform moisture content seemed to be problematic.  The FIJI top hats didn’t work out as envisioned.  Also the fact that we had very low humidity this spring, like a week under 10%, hasn’t helped.   And, then there are those gnats….urgh.   They have been like the plague this year, even finding a way between the tight fit of FIJI bottle on tree pot.

I will try again, only next time ditch the FIJI bottle tops and put the whole tree pot in a large plastic storage box, as I’ve done with Jon’s Uline bag method.   Which, I also tried for the first time this year, with terrific success.    For me, the all-important humidity issue is much easier to control via Jon’s method.  

Thanks for all your follow up posts. 

P1090533.jpg

P1090547.jpg 
P1090544.jpg 

Jon's Uline bag method

IMG_7017.jpg 
P1090223.jpg 



__________________
Jack
San Diego, North County Coastal
Zone 9A
Wish List for 2015: Black Madeira, Col de Dame Blanc. Noir and Gris,
ztfree1128

Registered:
Posts: 221
Reply with quote  #88 
I also wanted to post an update on this thread and thank Harvey again for posting this thread. I started about 40 cuttings using this method and I had about a 75% success rate. Half of the cuttings were started in standard promix with some added perlite and then the other half were started in 70% coir and 30% perlite. I noticed that the coir mix maintained moisture better and dried out less frequently leading to a slightly higher success rate. I did modify harvey's technique a little bit in that I put plastic ziploc bags over the top of each individual pot. I like this better than putting them in a humidity bin because if one cutting does develop mold/fungus it is isolated and less likely to spread to others. The main source of my losses was pots that dried out too much and then when I re watered them that seemed to either cause mold or they would just die. I also think that the heat/temperature is very important. When I started rooting in March the temperature in the room I was using was around 72 and the cuttings rooted but very slowly. Recently, since the temperatures have warmed up outside, the temp in the same room is now 80-85 and the cuttings I have going are rooting much faster and putting on a lot stronger growth. Like Harvey, I tried sealing the ends of some cuttings with parafilm but I also tried using wax- I didn't really see a difference between these two but I do think that sealing the end helped prevent drying out and improved my success. 
__________________
Zach
Baltimore, MD
Zone 7a
snaglpus

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 4,196
Reply with quote  #89 
Harvey, those pots in post #1 and #34 above, where did you get them?  and the tray too....

I've got a case of the tree pots from Stewe and Sons but the pots I have don't sit well in their trays.  I want some pots and trays like yours.

__________________
Dennis
Charlotte, North Carolina/Zone 8a 

HarveyC

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 3,318
Reply with quote  #90 
Jack, I'd ditch using Sunshine #4.  Stayed much too wet in my experience and fungus gnats appeared shortly after I did a batch with Sunshine #4.  I'd almost bet that it had eggs in it.  When I ran out of ProMix HP at one point I used the Sunshine #4 and at that time I did a batch of 40 pomegranate cuttings and had a success rate of only 10%.  I did another batch of 30 pomegranate cuttings two months later using the ProMix HP and it appears my success rate will be 100%.  Also, I don't think the humidity needs to be high so I'd ditch the bin and Fiji bottles.  The Paraflim keeps moisture in but lets air in as well which, I think is an advantage over using wax like Zach worked with.  I have no experience in using the wax, but that's an advantage I've read of in literature before.

Zach, I didn't really have trouble keeping these watered.  I would just add a small amount of water from the top every 2-3 days and when the bottoms were dry I'd dunk the entire tray of 20 pots into a tub of water for 15 seconds or so, and increasing the time once trees started to become established (as well as increase depth of water from 2" to maybe 5").  It would take me 30 minutes to an hour to water about 300 trees (longer time as trees became larger).  One downside of this that was a fair trade-off is that some smaller trees (i.e., runts) would get over-watered when getting dunked and would sometimes die as a result.  I would sometimes sort out trees into new trays to create full trays of similar sized trees to reduce this but sometimes time just wasn't available to do this.

Dennis, Stuewe carries these same pots and trays the mini treepots 3" x 8".  However, I have not ordered these from them but they do look identical.  I got mine for free!  Maybe a few thousand of them.  There were may tens of thousands available at the time from the planting of a winegrape vineyard on property previously owned by my dad and other relatives and I filled up the back of my pickup and now have a supply that will last me at least a few years.  Even if I had to buy them, I would use them again.  See MT38 and MT38T at http://www.stuewe.com/products/minitreepots.php

__________________

Harvey - Correia Farms
Isleton, CA (Sacramento County) USDA zone 9b, Sunset zone 14

http://www.figaholics.com
https://www.facebook.com/Figaholics
snaglpus

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 4,196
Reply with quote  #91 
THANKS HARVEY!!!!   Yeap, those are the ones I've been looking for.  I just called made an order including the trays.  Should be here in a few days.  Now, I'm happy!
__________________
Dennis
Charlotte, North Carolina/Zone 8a 

ztfree1128

Registered:
Posts: 221
Reply with quote  #92 
Thanks for your input Harvey, I will have to try the way you watered next year. 
__________________
Zach
Baltimore, MD
Zone 7a
HarveyC

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 3,318
Reply with quote  #93 
While I like the 3" x 8" mini treepots I've been using, I am open minded and am going to try some 3.5" x 5" pots.  Another winegrape vineyard just got planted down the road and the owner said I can have all the pots.  I estimate there are about 15,000 pots (plus trays) in this pile and I got about 2,500 today and will go back.  He said they have more and another farm I can have as well, but I think this is enough! :)

There are probably advantages and disadvantages to these pots.  They don't have a large hole in the bottom so the ProMix HP won't fall out but I won't be able to see root development as well.  The winder dimension will probably be easier for removing the plants when it's time to do so but the soil will probably also dry out a bit quicker.

[image] 

__________________

Harvey - Correia Farms
Isleton, CA (Sacramento County) USDA zone 9b, Sunset zone 14

http://www.figaholics.com
https://www.facebook.com/Figaholics
rcantor

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 5,851
Reply with quote  #94 
Congrats on the free pots   :)
__________________
Zone 6, MO

Wish list:
Martineca Rimada, Galicia Negra, Fioroni Ruvo, De La Reina - Pons, Tauro, BFF, Sefrawi, Sbayi, Mavra Sika , Fillaciano Bianco, Corynth, Souadi, Acciano Purple, LSU Tiger, LSU Red, Cajun Gold, BB-10 any great tasting fig
Rewton

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 2,031
Reply with quote  #95 
This is my summer set up for propagating from cuttings.  These cuttings were taken last winter but they weren't set up for rooting until 3 weeks ago.  I have them on my patio in partial shade under an old shower door with row cover material as shade cloth. There is a little bit of water in the bottom of the bin - just enough to keep the humidity up.  I have them in 5-1-1-1 mix with lime but no fertilizer.  I've just starting adding some very dilute fertilizer in the water.  About 3/4 of the cuttings have already leafed out or have green/swelling buds.  I would have used promix hp but don't know of a source near me.  The 5-1-1-1 mix seems to be working well though.

Attached Images
jpeg IMG_2476.jpg (54.08 KB, 72 views)
jpeg IMG_2477.jpg (80.24 KB, 73 views)


__________________
Steve MD zone 7a

HarveyC

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 3,318
Reply with quote  #96 
I thought I'd just bump this thread in case anybody else might like to try this method this season.  Also, wanted to mention that I have used this method several times also for green cuttings (actively growing).  As long as the cutting is fairly firm (lignified), success is just as good as dormant cuttings.  I trim off leaves and then wrap it with BuddyTape (see post 10) just like the dormant cuttings.
__________________

Harvey - Correia Farms
Isleton, CA (Sacramento County) USDA zone 9b, Sunset zone 14

http://www.figaholics.com
https://www.facebook.com/Figaholics
timclymer

Registered:
Posts: 313
Reply with quote  #97 
This is pretty interesting. Do you get as high a take rate with 5-1-1-1 versus promix (bx or hp)? Just started some cuttings in promix bx and I'm a little concerned that it's holding too much water (though last year it worked out just fine). I'm thinking of putting a bit of extra perlite in the mix just to lighten it a bit.
__________________
https://threefoldfarm.org - Fig trees and farm updates
https://threefoldfarm.org/store/ - Fig trees available for pickup
https://www.facebook.com/ThreefoldFarm
Mechanicsburg PA (6b,7a)
zone5figger

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 281
Reply with quote  #98 
Just like to thank you, Harvey (and Tim on his blog), for putting out this info.   I've started a run of cuttings following Harvey/Tim's posting with the exceptions of adding a bit of extra perlite to bring the BX towards HP(not available locally) ratio, a pinch of lime, and using plastic growsleeves or tubepots @ 3.5"x 10" instead of the treepots.   No bottom heat yet, temps ranging in 70's.   Tops wrapped with 1/4" parafilm(what I had on hand). The medium was lightly moistened when I potted the cuttings, and I've lightly watered once since.  3 weeks in, some are starting to bud out and seeing some roots on the sides of some of the containers.  
I like the way it limits the amount of handling/disturbance to the cutting.   I'm hoping I can leave them in those containers which have about a quart of medium in each for about 4-5 months, when they will move out to greenhouse and get potted up.  
How long did you keep them in the treepots before you repotted, Harvey?

__________________
Jesse- zone 5, 1000' elevation
wishlist- De Tres Esplets, Saint Martin, earliest maincrop and/or reliable/productive breba producing varieties
HarveyC

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 3,318
Reply with quote  #99 
Tim, I've only tried ProMix HP and Sunshine #4.  I wouldn't want anything with less perlite than what's in ProMix HP, I think.  In the early stages, I still water pretty carefully avoid saturating the mix too much.  I don't plan to ever use Sunshine #4 again.  It stayed much too wet and it sure seemed like it must have had fungus gnat eggs in it.

I've left trees in these pots for over 4-5 months several times.  Some I start selling in 2-3 months.  If it's one I'm keeping for myself, by 3-4 months I'm usually moving it into a 5 gallon pot but only filled 2/3 of the way.

Oh, and I've stuck with the original taller pots as I can see the roots from the bottom very well and I can fit more more plants on my propagation mats and it's easier go get the plant out of the pot.  I have about 7,000 of those 4" square pots now so may use them eventually, LOL.

__________________

Harvey - Correia Farms
Isleton, CA (Sacramento County) USDA zone 9b, Sunset zone 14

http://www.figaholics.com
https://www.facebook.com/Figaholics
smithmal

Registered:
Posts: 75
Reply with quote  #100 
Harvey,

Quick question:

I'm using mini tree pots (Stuewe&Sons) and ProMix HP as well.  I keep my cuttings in a dark bathroom.  To keep up the humidity, I fill a large plastic tote with about 1" - 2" of water, put in a couple of bricks and then put my tray with pots on top of that.  I then put on a top lossely to allow a little air exchange.

What I've found is that cuttings are budding, but slowly.

I'm thinking this is due to the lack of heat and possibly light so I'd like to transfer the whole shebang to a growth self with with a heated mat.

My question is, how important is it to keep humidity up with these cuttings?  I didn't notice you capping your pots at all, only wrapping the top of your cuttings with parafilm.  Is keeping the cuttings in a humidity chamber necessary?

Thanks,

smithmal

__________________
Malcolm - MD - Zone 6B

Varieties growing (Received 2014): Beale, Col de Dame Blanc, Danny's Delight, Desert King, JH Adriatic, Lemon, Longue d'Aout, Marseilles Black VS, Olympian, Ronde de Bordeaux, Strawberry Verte, Vista, UCR-184-15s, Violette de Bordeaux, White King

Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.