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lampo

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Good guidelines and demonstration on how to perform less common grafts for figs, but always useful to be aware of.
The clips are not spoken in English although very comprehensively shown.
When correctly done these grafts are very strong mechanically.




Giovanni Rigo shows the 'triangle graft' particularly useful on harder wood fruit trees, the whip and a special budding technique to avoid the bud to be flooded with sap.

Another clip shows the 'flauta',  'flute' or the 'bark ring' graft, used with chestnut, olives, figs...
The new/young shoots will be as strong as if they were coming from the stock.


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pitangadiego

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Reply with quote  #2 
Love the idea of the ring-bark graft.
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Reply with quote  #3 
The ring-bark graft is quite the idea, I will be giving that a try come spring. 
zone5figger

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Reply with quote  #4 
That bark is really slipping on the ring graft- nifty!   You can see in the 'next year' shot at the end how the new shoot was tied to another sucker or lower branch to give it additional support.   First year bud grafts can be a little fragile at the union and can be blown off in windy conditions.
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Reply with quote  #5 
I've never had wind damage any of my grafts, yet this year I hail remove or damage beyond repair 2/3 of this springs grafts.
jc_figs

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dang so did you replace them or just forgot about them
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Jailen

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Reply with quote  #7 
The damage occurred long after the ideal grafting time had passed. I was given some residual scionwood from a friend and was able to replace a couple grafts lost to the hail plus some additional varieties. Most of the grafts took, still not as many as I had started with. 

Andy, thanks again for all of the Scionwood!!!

Next year I'm planning to reduce the number of grafts a bit, I will most likely replace only the ones I lost to the hail, we'll see.
jc_figs

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oh i might try grafting next year
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Jailen

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For sure, nothing to lose. for me, it is a great way to get additional varieties without planting additional trees.  Before grafting, I did a lot of research and watched a lot of videos. Took my time made sure that I was precise and even my first year I had an 80 percent success rate. If it were not for the hail this year I bet I would have had greater than a 90 percent success rate. It is definitely an art and a skill, practice it's the only way to learn.
jc_figs

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Reply with quote  #10 
yeah its fast and easy but you have to take your time have u tried to remave the outer bark layer and graft that to something
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Jailen

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Reply with quote  #11 
As I mentioned in an early post, I'm now going to try the ring - bark graft this spring, if time and conditions allow. I also plan to try a couple bud grafts on rootstock trees come late spring. 
jc_figs

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o ok thats wat i will be trying next year
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Jailen

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What will you be trying on? 
jc_figs

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a celeste from lowes
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Jailen

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Cool.  You'll have to post pics.  Good luck. 
pitangadiego

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Reply with quote  #16 
So what happens if you make the ring of bark with the bud, but the stock you are grafting onto is too small? Why not cut the ring and then wrap as much as you need around the rootstock? Nothing says the ring has to be intact.

This doesn't appear that it would work with dormant wood because dormant wood would not have "slipping" bark like was used in the video. That would make it near impossible to make the ring. That would mean that we are back to chip-budding and T-budding?

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jc_figs

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Reply with quote  #17 
well if the other branch was to small could u possibly tie it
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Reply with quote  #18 
Quote:
Originally Posted by pitangadiego
So what happens if you make the ring of bark with the bud, but the stock you are grafting onto is too small? Why not cut the ring and then wrap as much as you need around the rootstock? Nothing says the ring has to be intact.

This doesn't appear that it would work with dormant wood because dormant wood would not have "slipping" bark like was used in the video. That would make it near impossible to make the ring. That would mean that we are back to chip-budding and T-budding?


One would need to be rather precise in choosing the gage of both the scion and the stock materials. Without a matching gage I see no reason why you could not remove the excess material from the ring to fit a smaller stock. Or even cut the ring to fit a larger gage of stock. Then it would only be a matter of properly securing and sealing the graft to the stock matterial.

And I agreed that wood will definitely need to have sap flowing where the bark is slipping easily. And even in the event that it is not all bark is so easily removed from the wood. Exposing the vascular cambium layer is rarely as easy as was seen in the video. In my experience, only my European plums have proven to be so easy to slip the bark, if I try the flute "ring" graft, it will be on one of them.

I'll be sure to share the experience if I do try it.
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