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Subject: Black Bethlehem Replies: 11
Posted By: robertharper Views: 1,235
 
Martin, Bass says that Bethlehem Black is super sweet.

Did you find it to be super sweet also?

Bob



Subject: And....Florea fig again.. Replies: 6
Posted By: robertharper Views: 809
 
Marius, can you describe the flavor profile?

Herman, does not think it is a great tasting fig in New Jersey.

So, I'm trying to figure out how far west does one have to go to get Florea to produce great tasting figs?

Can you also describe the sweetness level on a scale of 1 to 10?

Thanks

Bob

Subject: 6 Cuttings On Wish List Replies: 176
Posted By: robertharper Views: 17,501
 
This is a update to the figs I'm looking for.

1a. Col de Dame noir, Gris,or Blanche

2a. Black Beauty # 10

3a Cajun Honey

4a. Maltese Falcon

5a. Black Madeira (Without FMV) Willing to purchase or trade.
Our Marseilles Black VS, and Violetta Bayernfeige had to be pruned the heaviest last fall.

1. Hanc Mathies's English Brown Turkey

2. LaRadek's English Brown turkey 

3. Golden Celeste *with tan pulp

4. Hanc Mathies's Atreano

Bob

Subject: Marseilles black vs,Breba! Replies: 30
Posted By: robertharper Views: 3,745
 
I'm starting to wonder if perhaps Warren initially thought Marseilles Black VS, was a Brown Turkey because at the time, the only figs thought to be able to take temperatures down to minus 18 degrees Fahrenheit, were the English Brown Turkeys???

 I'm getting conflicting weather data from the different weather stations in that area.
Is there any one out there who knows exactly what town the mother tree is growing?

If I can locate the town it is growing in, I can contact their town hall to confirm the winter low for the area in 1984, I hope? 

I want to make sure this weather data I'm seeing, is correct and confirmed by an official of the town.

Bob


Subject: HELP Rotten Figs!! Replies: 3
Posted By: robertharper Views: 2,153
 
Half of our Marseilles Black VS, breba crop had a small open eye, with ants getting inside. When I first noticed the ants going inside the fruit, I was expecting the fruit to spoil. But to my surprise even though the ants were going inside the ones with a open eye, and it was raining, the Marseilles Black VS did not spoil or rot.

Another plus for Marseilles Black VS.

Herman, did Jon name both the Marseilles Black VS, and the Maryland Berry?

I thought I read once some place that Warren initially thought Marseilles Black VS, was a Brown Turkey. Did the Marseilles Black VS, and the Maryland Berry come from different tress?

Bob

Bob

Subject: Marseilles black vs,Breba! Replies: 30
Posted By: robertharper Views: 3,745
 
Herman, do you have any idea of the year that Warren took cuttings from the Marseilles Black VS, American mother tree, in Maryland?

I'm hoping that Warren took the cuttings after 1984. If he did, that would confirm that the American mother tree survived the 1984 minus 18 degrees Fahrenheit low in that area.

Or does anyone have the exact address of the American mother tree in Maryland, and if it is still there?

Warren, has not returned any emails in about two years. So he may be, and I hope not, sick or something.

Bob

Subject: Marseilles black vs,Breba! Replies: 30
Posted By: robertharper Views: 3,745
 

After reading through all the post, we found that some F4F members were suggesting Marseilles Black VS, as the fig garden work horse. So, we ordered enough cuttings from Herman to give us four plants, for our garden and two for friends. We planted three in ground fall of 2009, and kept one in a pot, as a back up.

2010, we got maybe a dozen, and the taste was a big disappointment. They tasted like the store bought picked to green figs. Was starting to wonder why so high a rating from you and other growers, and was planning on top working all four plants.

Then this year our potted plant started ripening breba figs, about three days ago, 8-10-2011. What a pleasant surprise, as for taste. Our maybe three foot potted plant has about 50 figs on it, and still the breba figs taste good.

Leone, reported that his three year old Marseilles Black VS produced 200 figs, one year. Needless to say we will not be top working all four plants. 

Marseilles Black VS is a (FAN) "Feed a Nation" plant". Bug resistant, disease resistant, a heavy producer, and easy to grow.

As to your question Herman, our breba crop figs were about 30% bigger then last years main crop figs 

The wife and I are not big lovers of figs that taste like some other fruit. But, to are pleasant surprise Marseilles Black VS, has a slight mulberry flavor. But, yet enough fig flavor, to make it a recommenced cultivar by us.

Our thanks to you and Warren for bringing this cultivar too the attention of those who want to grow figs in a very cold climate.

 In checking the historic weather data for the area were this fig grew for over 60 years, it looks to me this fig has experienced temperatures as low as minis 18 degrees Fahrenheit, in 1984. Research suggest the fig was planted some time during or right after world war II, in the Columbia Maryland area.

Every country or rural family in very cold parts of the country, should have at least ten plants of Marseilles Black VS, for a reliable supply of figs through out the year.

Bob





Subject: english brown turkey? Replies: 22
Posted By: robertharper Views: 2,540
 
I asked Michale about two months ago at Edible Landscaping, if his English Brown Turkey originated from Hance Mathies, and he say no. He said he was now getting his stock of English Brown Turkey,  from a wholesaler in the south.

Bob

Subject: english brown turkey? Replies: 22
Posted By: robertharper Views: 2,540
 
I asked Michale about two months ago at Edible Landscaping, if his English Brown Turkey originated from Hance Mathies, and he say no. He said he was now getting his stock of English Brown Turkey,  from a wholesaler in the south.

Bob

Subject: Atreano is making extremly large fruits this year(5th).(pix) Replies: 11
Posted By: robertharper Views: 894
 
Herman,do you think it may be that large because of the large amount of soil moisture that was available this Spring, and Summer?

If it did not diminish the sweetness and flavor, do you think that 
Atreano would benifit from being mulched with something, to keep it's roots moist, during the growing season?

Bob

Subject: Black Beauty 10 Replies: 231
Posted By: robertharper Views: 10,231
 
Dan, from the outside, your Black Beauty 10, looks a lot like 
Kathleen's Black, to me. 

Is it possible that Kathleen's Black and Noir De Caromb could be, or are members of the same family of figs?

Some of the leaves of your Black Beauty look exactly like my Kathleen's Black.

Gene Hosey, told me once that if I were to taste a Kathleen's Black, I would feed my Hardy Chicago to the pigs. 

I think that is quite an endorsement from a collector who has tasted so many different figs. Especially when one considers that Ray Givens, who also has tasted many different figs, selected Hardy Chicago as his favorite tasting fig. I wonder whether or not Ray Givens has since had a chance to taste Kathleen's Black?

At any rate, even if Kathleen's Black and Noir De Caromb are not the same, for those fig collectors who are in pursuit of finding the best tasting figs, or group of best tasting figs, your find, I think, confirms that the family of figs that Noir De Caromb and Kathleen's Black belong to is the direction to go.

If not the same fig, Kathleen's Black and Noir De Caromb may be so closely related that even some DNA testing may not resolve the question, as to whether or not they are the same fig. But, in my opinion the most important thing is that two collectors who have tasted many good tasting figs, have selected this fig, or these two figs, as the best tasting figs, that they have ever tasted.

Great find Dan.

Bob  

 

Subject: Italian Honey Replies: 5
Posted By: robertharper Views: 884
 
Thanks for the posting Dan.

A  lot of us look forward to your postings, because they are very informative. A lot of your postings give information that we have not been able to find else where. Such as flavor profiles, sweetness levels, and comparative taste against other well know figs.

Although, you are located in a entirely different climate then we are, here in Connecticut, you have helped us a lot in determining what figs to seek out. 

I think your postings help a lot of people who are new to figs, get the right fig for their particular taste, a lot faster.

In the beginning of our interest in figs, we had no idea that there were so many different fig flavors. So, we assumed all figs tasted the same. Then after tasting several that we had planted, we realized that there were many different flavors of figs., that we did not like. If we had known that earlier it would have saved us several years of looking for what we could call our favor figs.

I also believe that is the reason why so many people who have a fig tree in their yard, say that they do not like figs. They simply have one that has a flavor that they do not like, and do not realize there are many other different flavors in certain figs 

So, with that said, can you rate the sweetness level of your Italian Honey find, to the sweetness level of White Trianna? 

Bob

Subject: Fig Tree - Hardy Chicago Replies: 8
Posted By: robertharper Views: 1,582
 
Good advise Jason.

Bob

Subject: Unusual fig tree Replies: 8
Posted By: robertharper Views: 1,282
 
Marius, that is, at least in my mind a very impressive crop for a cutting that is only a little over four months old.

 Marius, do you have it in a pot and where are you located?

Bob

 

Subject: A new unknown Replies: 5
Posted By: robertharper Views: 770
 
Bill, thanks for the quick reply.

Is it grown in a pot or in the ground.

Is it winter protected? 

Can you describe the flavor profile?

Bob

Subject: A new unknown Replies: 5
Posted By: robertharper Views: 770
 
Bill, is the fruit Breba or main crop?

Thanks.

Bob

Subject: Ripening order Replies: 99
Posted By: robertharper Views: 32,507
 
Macmike. We are in a zone 5 in Connecticut, and have ground figs here, are, Marseilles Black VS, Danny's Delight, Hardy Chicago, Sal's EL, Hardy Hartford seem to be cold hardy here. We have been burying them for winter protection. But some are as tall as 8 to 10 feet 

For our area of Connecticut, Sal's EL, is the gold standard for cold hardiness, in zone 5. It has been winter tested in our area since around 1990. The original tester ended his testing by keeping out of his collection, only Sal's EL.

The next most cold hardy fig would be the English Brown Turkeys. But, more difficult to locate, and you may have to try several to find one that will ripen all it's main crop figs before frost. But, they are reputed to be able to take temperatures of minus 18 degrees Fahrenheit, through zone 5 without winter protection, and zone 4A with winter protection.

Hope that helps.

Bob

Subject: Ripening order Replies: 99
Posted By: robertharper Views: 32,507
 
Macmike. We are in a zone 5 in Connecticut, and have ground figs here, are, Marseilles Black VS, Danny's Delight, Hardy Chicago, Sal's EL, Hardy Hartford seem to be cold hardy here. We have been burying them for winter protection. But some are as tall as 8 to 10 feet 

For our area of Connecticut, Sal's EL, is the gold standard for cold hardiness, in zone 5. It has been winter tested in our area since around 1990. The original tester ended his testing by keeping out of his collection, only Sal's EL.

The next most cold hardy fig would be the English Brown Turkeys. But, more difficult to locate, and you may have to try several to find one that will ripen all it's main crop figs before frost. But, they are reputed to be able to take temperatures of minus 18 degrees Fahrenheit, through zone 5 without winter protection, and zone 4A with winter protection.

Hope that helps.

Bob

Subject: help identifying another fig Replies: 6
Posted By: robertharper Views: 811
 
Good find John,

Good picture of the leaf and the fruit.

Was the tree winter protected at all, before the year you dug it up?

 It it wasn't, was there much winter damage to it?

Bob

Subject: My Sal's corleone did not produce figs this year Replies: 13
Posted By: robertharper Views: 822
 
Cecil, I planted Sal's Corleone last year, also. I wasn't expecting anything last year, and figure it would start it's second year. But, no it did not start producing at all this year, either. Although It is very healthy looking and growing very strongly. It is now about four feet high, and is not showing any signs of any FMV.

Of all the varieties we have planted, they have all started to produce there first year in the ground. Except for Ronde de Bourdeux, and Sal's Corleone. 

So, I'm guessing it simply may not always start producing it"s first year for all locations?????

Bob

Subject: Red Fig Growing in the ground in NY for at least 75 yrs Replies: 11
Posted By: robertharper Views: 826
 
Paul, thanks for finding and posting that fig. Paul, can you describe the flavor profile of the fig?

 Paul, where does your aunt live in New York? I would like to check the historical weather data for her area. I'm researching figs and weather. Both Herman and I believe that figs have the ability to adapt more quickly then most other plants.

My research is suggesting that if a fig can be kept from freezing to death, to survive each winter, it will eventually add a degree or two for each decade of being in a certain old location

Herman, I think I'm slowly getting there. That is, in being able to identify figs by leaf and or fruit. 

I was also thinking Aldo's, Sicilian red, or Sal's Corleone. 

Herman, aren't those three suppose to be the same?

Bob

Subject: Kathleen Blk,and Maltese Falcon Breba! Replies: 23
Posted By: robertharper Views: 1,964
 
71GTO, My impression from having it in ground in our zone 5 last year, It would have frozen to the ground and maybe would have completely died., if it had not been buried. Then we still lost about 40% of the plant.

 It does not appear to me to be cold hardy lower then a zone 7.

since we are testing for cold hardiness, I will keep it in ground to see whether or not it's cold hardiness will improve over the years. But, will air layer a branch this year in the event we lose the inground plant.

I'm hoping as the root system grows deeper it will become more cold hardy.

Noss, I asked Herman if he could describe the flavor and he said no. But, I will be keeping it to see for my sell. Since both Gene and Herman have given it such high grades.

Bob, zone 5

Subject: Kathleen Blk,and Maltese Falcon Breba! Replies: 23
Posted By: robertharper Views: 1,964
 
I just got through watering my Kathleen Black. I'm actually surprised it is alive. When it arrived from Gene, last year it was potted and grew to be a nice big healthy tree.

I planted it out fall of 2010. along with Danny's Delight, Sal's EL, and another Hardy Hartford.

Come spring of 2011, I uncovered them and to my surprise had heavy winter damage to them, except for Hardy Hartford.

When I got the Kathleen Black from Gene, it had no sighs of a virus. But, it is now showing all the signs of a virus. I'm starting to believe the one way to tell if a plant has is cold hardy or not is to plant them out. If they come out of dormancy in the spring you can tell right away if it's cold hardy or not by how heavy the FMV is????

Can any of you who have been growing Kathleen's Black for any time describe it's flavor profile?

Bob



Subject: LSU Golden Celeste (amber pulp strain) Replies: 19
Posted By: robertharper Views: 3,434
 
Dan, thanks for the additional information, on your strain.

Can you post pictures of the leaves?

Thanks Bob

Subject: Ronde de Bordeaux earliest main crop? Replies: 17
Posted By: robertharper Views: 1,717
 
Not a problem you chipping in.

The more people submitting information the better for all of us.

How did you make out with the cuttings I sent to you?

Bob

Subject: Ronde de Bordeaux earliest main crop? Replies: 17
Posted By: robertharper Views: 1,717
 
Bass, thanks for the additional information on Ronde de Bordeaux. 

I still like the information I'm reading about Ronde de Bordeaux, and will be looking forward to mine starting to bear. Not sure why mine is taking so long to start bearing. 

Your Black Bethlehem  reminds me of Ronde de Bordeaux. Can you describe the difference and the similarities between the Black Bethlehem and Ronde de Bordeaux?

Thanks.

Bob 

Subject: Ronde de Bordeaux earliest main crop? Replies: 17
Posted By: robertharper Views: 1,717
 
Gwenn, thanks for posting the pictures.

Bass, thanks for jumping in.

I'm I correct in starting to believe that the description of Ronde de Bordeaux was written a long time ago. Before varieties like Florea, Sal's EL, Marseilles Black VS, and a host of other American figs, that were found in the last 50 years?

I purchased my Ronde de Bordeaux because I had read in so many different places that it was a very early ripening fig. But, I find that it is not as early as the ones above. Plus, this is the the second in ground year for mine, and it shows no signs of starting to produce fruit.Where as the above figs and Hardy Hartford start producing a good crop of figs the first in ground year.

Bass, are you saying that your Ronde de Bordeaux ripens it's main crop figs, Mid August, or it's breba crop in mid August?

Bass, how old was your Ronde de Bordeaux before it started producing fruit? and what month does it start to ripen main crop fruit at your location?

Bob

Subject: Differences between Black Celeste and Malta Black Replies: 31
Posted By: robertharper Views: 4,020
 
Bass, as usual, outstanding photography

I'm surprised that your not working as a full time nature photographer.

I'm going to add this picture of Black Malta to my fig fruit collection.

Bob

Subject: Mystery Variety? (Pics) Pinkish/Golden, Small, Strawberry Pulp Replies: 5
Posted By: robertharper Views: 648
 
FruitNut, I'm just a beginner. But, to my inexperienced eye I would venture to say one of the many Celeste strains.

I have heard from a lot of collectors that Celeste, for the most part does not have a breba crop. Or, at best a very small crop of breba. So with you getting that big a harvest so early in the fig season, I'm guessing your in the South, some where.

What town is the tree located? They look like they would be pure sugar.

Any pictures of the tree, to get an idea of how big it is?

Bob 

Subject: St. Jerome (in-ground)....pics Replies: 4
Posted By: robertharper Views: 910
 
Dan, that is a impressive number of figs, for a plant that was killed down to the roots, just last winter. Will the fruit ripen for you this year?

Bob

Subject: early main crop variety. Replies: 8
Posted By: robertharper Views: 1,069
 
Noss, as far as I'm concerned there is no comparison. For us, Hardy Chicago only set about a dozen or so main crop figs this year, by June 1st, and it has been in the ground here, for at least 6 years. It produced those dozen or so main crop figs after we notched it, pinched it, and gave it heavy applications of Bloom Booster. This will be the last year for it. But, there is of course a chance that we did not receive a true Hardy Chicago, from the nursery that we ordered from. 

Hardy Hartford, appears to be one of those figs that start off good from the very first year. the first year in the ground it produced 10 nice and figgy tasting figs, They also all ripened a month before our first frost.

This year will be it's  second year in the ground for us. We kept it in a pot for two years. Because of other things going on, we did not get  a chance to plant it as we had planned.

This will be it's second year in the ground and it has set 40 to 50 main crop figs by June 1st., in our zone 5.

I have not had enough experience in tasting different figs, But, I'm like you when it comes to my taste preference in figs. It should be super sweet and scream figgy fig. Not some other fruit flavor. But, I'm being told by other collectors there are other figs that have taste other then figgy that are considered great, such as Gino's. So, we will be test tasting others as time goes on, and top working those that do not meet our taste preference. So far, for a young fig, I'm really impressed by Hardy Hartford. Herman says that figs that start out good usually increase in their good points.

When we took cuttings of Hardy Hartford this last spring, there were several stems that had gotten around 8 feet high. Although it is planted up against a building it has not had any type of winter protection in over the thirty years it's been growing in Hartford 

Last year here it was a true fig summer here, nice and hot. So, we have not gotten a chance to see what it will taste like during a cold summer like 2009. 

The only fault I have been able to detect so far, is the size. It's not going to be a commercial fig. It's about the same size as Marseilles Black VS. But in 2010 it ripened it's fruit 3 days earlier then the Marseilles planted right next to it. That was the first flush of figs. The second flush of figs ripened about 5 days before Marseilles Black VS,

We have sent cuttings out to 20 to 30 collectors and are waiting for their evaluations, and hopefully an identification. I'm also eager to get your assessment of it in our area. I think with your heat it might turn out to be super sweet. So, go ahead and try to get your cuttings to root. If they don't root for you, let me know and I will get more cuttings out to you this fall.

Bob 

Subject: Figs in Michigan Replies: 12
Posted By: robertharper Views: 1,748
 
John, great pictures. Good inspiration for those of us in cold climate areas.

Planted at a 45 degree angle is how we planted half of our figs. Also close to the foundation on the south side of the house.

For those who have been asking if it's okay to plant figs that close to the foundation, take a look at how close the figs are to the house.

Herman, how is the skin on the Desert King? Can you eat the skin, or is it tough like Brooklyn white?

Bob

Subject: early main crop variety. Replies: 8
Posted By: robertharper Views: 1,069
 
Here, in a zone 5 part of Connecticut, our early main croppers have been; Hardy Hartford, Marseilles Black VS, Sal's el, and Danny's Delight. These four have been so far our best figs out of about a dozen in ground trees. I also understand that Herman's Florea is also early. 

Hardy Chicago has been a big disappointment here. It's has been a light bearer that has to many fruit still green by the time frost comes. 

Is there any one out there who has a Hardy Chicago fig, in ground, in zone 5 or 6, that has finished setting a lot of main crop figs by the end of June, each year??

I'm looking to top work the Hardy Chicago strain we have. Even with pinching, notching and heavy foliar applications of Bloom Booster, ours only produced a dozen or so main crop figs, by the end of June. Then in July the embryos come on heavy. But, by then most do not ripen. before frost.

Bob

Subject: Florea fig,has ripe Breba inground in New Jersey Replies: 27
Posted By: robertharper Views: 4,103
 
Fignut, thanks for the taste evaluation of Florea. 

I remember you saying last year that you thought Florea tasted good. 

I'm interested in Florea because we are trialing cold hardy figs here in our zone 5 part of Connecticut.

Herman said he discarded it for lack of better taste. Herman has tested and tasted several hundred figs. So, his taste requirements are a lot more selective then mine.

Herman, also said that Florea has a mulberry flavor profile. How would you describe it's flavor profile?

 I have always felt that those of us in zone 5 and 4 would be very happy to have a fig that can take down to minus 10 degrees Fahrenheit. That would cover most of USA zone 6.

Please keep us posted on your trialing of Florea. How old was Florea when you planted it outside?

Bob

Subject: Florea fig,has ripe Breba inground in New Jersey Replies: 27
Posted By: robertharper Views: 4,103
 
Herman, when you say regular Celeste, are you talking about the Blue Celeste you have in your collection?

71GTO, I google, "historical weather". That takes me to, "Weather Underground". Then I  scroll down  until I see History data, on the left. Then I type in the town/city, state  and zip code. Then I type in what day, month, and year I want information on. It gives me the high, the low, the average and the record low, going back 50 years or so.

I start my record checking at December 15th, and go through February 15th. It's not 100 percent accurate because they may not have a weather station near you. But, it gives me an idea of how cold it has gotten in a particular area..

 Bob

Subject: New Jersey area:Desert King ,close to ripe! Replies: 21
Posted By: robertharper Views: 1,515
 
Okay, Herman. You know I'm going to ask, What type of flavor profile does the breba Desert King fruit have, as grown at your place, in a pot?

Bob

Subject: Florea fig,has ripe Breba inground in New Jersey Replies: 27
Posted By: robertharper Views: 4,103
 
Paully, what zone are you in?
 
Herman, that is exactly why I'm interested in Florea. We are testing and trialing figs in hope of locating a fig that can be grown in zone 5, with little or no protection in the winter. 
 
I don't particularly like figs that have another fruit flavor. But, if a growing technique can be found to make Florea great tasting, then I think it is worth trialing to see what amendments can be used to make it more sweet and more flavorful. 
 
From the information you have given on it so far Herman, it seems like maybe the planting spot for it has to be very Sunny and dry. Also, it appears it wants soil that drains very easy, and maybe a extra large amount of calcium, and builders sand. 
 
I just wonder of your friend had grown his Florea, in a spot that got maybe 12 hours of sun, if that would have taken the ones you sampled from good to excellent. Plus, with it ripening so early during hot weather it could be left on the tree until it maybe dries? If I could get it to turn to a raisin, I think a VERY sweet fig with the flavor of a mulberry, would be a very special flavor. Herman, how well does it stay attached to the tree, once they become ripe?
 
Can anyone report back who is growing Marseilles Black VS in ground, unprotected in zone 6b. From the research we have done on the Internet, it would appear that at one time, Marseilles Black, VS has endured temperatures as low as minus 18 degrees Fahrenheit, where the mother tree is growing in Maryland. Which makes me wonder whether or not the Marseilles Black VS,might be as cold hardy as Florea?
 
Bob. 

Subject: Morus :: Cousin of Carica Replies: 13
Posted By: robertharper Views: 980
 
Bass, what month do you do your grafting of Mulberry?

Martin, when you say Chicago mulberry, are you talking  about the mulberry called Illinois Ever bearing?

Is there anyone in zone 5 having success with growing and fruiting the Pakistan mulberry? The one that is suppose to grow up to 4" long?

Bob

Subject: Florea fig,has ripe Breba inground in New Jersey Replies: 27
Posted By: robertharper Views: 4,103
 
Herman, I have been thinking about getting my hands on four or five cuttings to plant with different soil amendments to see if the taste can be improved, Do you think that maybe you abandoned your trailing of it to soon????

If your friend is getting good tasting figs from a Florea that only gets that amount of sun. Is it possible it will bear good tasting fruit on the upper east coast. But, it simply needs more time to develop good quality tasting fruit? 

I think Florea needs to be tested under different growing conditions here on the east coast. I think this fig just might be a sleeper, and all we need to do is figure out what type of soil amending it requires.

Herman, can you describe the flavor profile?

You other collectors who are growing Florea out there, can you tell us what you think of the taste and flavor of your Florea??

Bob

Subject: New Jersey area:Desert King ,close to ripe! Replies: 21
Posted By: robertharper Views: 1,515
 
Herman, I missed the post about why the main crop figs were left on the Desert King. 

Thanks for repeating it.

 It helped me in understanding more on how to have a breba fig in the north. It also, has maybe delayed me from top working my Bayernfigie Violetta. I may have inadvertently reduced the Violetta's ability to produce more breba figs. After the main crop of figs had formed on the Violetta, I pinched out all new growth and more then likely pinched out the next year's breba. So instead of having only 15 breba I may have been able to have at least twice that. 

Before I get back into testing the Violetta for breba taste, I know you were also testing it. How did you find the taste of Violetta's breba crop?

But, now with this additional information you have provided, I'm going to want a Desert King fig. Just when I thought I had all the fig plants we had room for.

Bob

Subject: New Jersey area:Desert King ,close to ripe! Replies: 21
Posted By: robertharper Views: 1,515
 
Nice pictures Herman. That's twice the amount of breba that I have on our Bayernfigie Violleta. Which has it's last summer to convince me not to top work it over. I have already grafted one of  the Gino's cuttings, you sold to  me to it.

We were comparing it's Breba crop to Bass's Brooklyn White's breba. Which only has two breba left. So it is on the list to be top worked also. Although Bass says it will get better?? So we will give it this summer to convince us, not to top work it.

Is there a reason why you have allowed the main crop of figs to remain on the your Desert king plant?

Bob

Subject: A Few Winner Celeste Strains Replies: 16
Posted By: robertharper Views: 1,810
 
Great informative post Dan. My IC is very, very young. Rooted just this last spring in April.. It has single lobe, two and three lobes. I will post pictures once the plant is bigger. Right now it is only about 6 inches tall.

From the descriptions of taste and flavor that both you and Herman have given it, I look forward to tasting it. Especially since it has that figgy flavor, that some of us like in a fig.

I'm really surprised to hear that your Blue Celeste froze to the ground. Herman has been trialing it in New Jersey, and reports it to be one of his more cold hardy figs.

Will be looking forward to your future reports on Celeste from you area.

Great report and pictures of the different Celeste

Bob



Subject: Zingarella Replies: 35
Posted By: robertharper Views: 2,421
 
Hello Olga,

Those are nice pictures. This is one reason why this forum is so good. We all get a chance to report how a certain fig is doing in certain locations.

Herman, There appears to me a lot of confusion when it comes to the different figs growing in America. I think one of those reason there is so much contradicting information is the fig it's self. 

I'm starting to wonder from my own trialing of figs here is that whether or not most figs have some strain of Mosaic virus.But, do not show it unless they are stress, especially if stressed by cold.

In the spring of 2010, I received a big beautiful fig plant of, Kathleen's Black. I grew that plant in a pot all summer and it was a very strong growing plant, that ended the season with a lot of growth and showed absolutely no signs of any type of Mosaic virus.

So, that Fall I planted it along with Danny's Delight, Hardy Hartford, and Sal's El, in the ground, bent them to the ground and cover each with about 4 to 5 inches of soil. last winter was one of those very cold winter for us. It got down to minus ten degrees Fahrenheit here. Danny's Delight, Sal's El, and Kathleen's Black suffered about 50% die back from the winter cold, although they were covered with soil.

Hardy Hartford was the smallest plant planted, and suffered only about a 5% die back. All of the above plants have completely recovered, except for Kathleen's Black, and showed absolutely no signs of any Mosaic virus. Except for Kathleen's Black. It is stunted and shows a very bad case of Mosaic virus.

It seems to me the Kathleen's Black was doing fine until it was exposed to our very cold winters.

Is it possible that fig plants like people come down with a viruses when they are exposed to cold winter conditions??? 

It seems to me some fig plants react very quickly to change. in soil and climate. then when you exposed them to cold, dormant viruses are able to get a hold over the plants immune system, while a plant right next to it completely recovers?????????

Just my two cents.

Bob

  

Subject: Ripening order Replies: 99
Posted By: robertharper Views: 32,507
 
Artfuldodger, is that a breba fig, and if so, how many will you end up with???

Bob

Subject: Best figs at your location Replies: 308
Posted By: robertharper Views: 76,644
 
Hello Artfuldodger,

Can you describe the flavor and how sweet it is, on a scale 1 through 10?

Thanks.

Bob

Subject: Ripe Panevino Dark Replies: 53
Posted By: robertharper Views: 5,405
 
Leon, I was thinking the exact same thing. That it looked a lot like Sal's Corleone.

Bass, do you have a Sal's Corleone to compare with your Panevino?

Bob

Subject: Violetta Fig Replies: 16
Posted By: robertharper Views: 4,320
 
Not overly impress with the quality of the fruit. Fruited a main crop last year. So, will try the breba crop this year. started off with around 80 breba beginning of May.

beginning of June now down to about 20 breba. All the rest have fallen off.

Sounds like a great fig. But it has not lived up to the hype. Would not plant it again. Unless the breba turn out to be better tasting then last year's main crop.

Bob



Subject: Cherry Time! Replies: 9
Posted By: robertharper Views: 870
 
Since we have a lot of different types of fruits along with cherries, that we have been losing to the birds, I have been doing research on bird deterrents. 

I have been reading that the University of Massachusetts has come up with a bird deterrent that can be sprayed on fruits. Four packets of Kool-Aid to a gallon  of water is recommended. 

Also, I have read it's being used to clear pigeons from airports. I intend to  try it this year. If it works it seems it would be a lot easier then trying to put nets on all the things the birds eat from us.

I'm told the Kool-Aid is applied just as the fruit is starting to show red.

Bob 

Subject: Looking for a ronde de bordeaux Replies: 3
Posted By: robertharper Views: 1,142
 
Contact Bass, at Trees of Joy. I purchased mine from him last year. I try to purchase from form members simply because a lot of nurseries know nothing about figs, and you can never tell what they really shipped to you until much later.

Forum members who have nurseries or who simply have extra trees are more likely to ship what you ordered.

Bob

Subject: successful Italian fig growers in Pennsylvania Replies: 37
Posted By: robertharper Views: 3,890
 
Bass, the Trianna fig that Angelo is growing, is that the same fig that Joe Morale in Boston sells, as White Trianna???

Bob

 

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