Register  |   | 
 
 
 


The search returned 87 posts

Only find topics started by terowan
   
Topics  |  Posts
Subject: Fig Orchard complete....well almost Replies: 55
Posted By: terowan Views: 4,307
 
Dennis, your fig project has a lot of potential.  For those of us who grow figs in ground in the mid atlantic region it will be real interesting to see what you learn about varieties and growing techniques etc. in our climate.

Subject: Spring equals hard work Replies: 11
Posted By: terowan Views: 1,007
 
Dennis,
I look forward to seeing the fig orchard and the irrigation system!  The local dogwoods and oaks seem to be saying we probably have seen the last frost, at least I hope so.


Subject: irrigation Replies: 19
Posted By: terowan Views: 1,178
 
Dennis, I'm not an irrigation expert and it is clear everyone has a different situation and on top of that in math you can get the correct answer in different ways.  Having said that, I will share what works for me.  I measured the amount of gallons per hour on my spigot at 560.  My emitters on the microsprinklers put out 10 gph.  I have a well and the pressure is not ever over 50 PSI and it works great on 25 microsprinklers at a time (250gph?).  I don't know how much pressure they require to work but the output is uniform.  I used a 1/2 inch mainline probably 200 feet long.  I measured the output of each microsprinkler as 7/10 inch per hour in a rain gauge.  I know what a given amount of rain does for my soil so I give them what I think they need based on rainfall.  People talk about making the soil wet up to 1/2 of field capacity, but I don't get that scientific.  I just want it to be moistened evenly to where I've seen the plants grow well in drought.  Usually, I read soil needs about one inch per week but YMMV.  My sandy soil needs more.  You're doing a larger number of trees but if you had to you could use 3/4 inch mainline because it has less resistance like I had to in my veggie garden for drip.  Also, you could break it up into 2 zones or sections if you needed to.  Al's idea of starting at the top makes sense to me.
OMG, I watched my neighbor and his friend use the auger to build his fence.  Two big guys and they were working!


Subject: irrigation Replies: 19
Posted By: terowan Views: 1,178
 
Jon, you've got me thinking.  There are so many different variables.  My soil is sandy and I use Dripworks 1/4 soaker dripline in my raised beds for veggies.  They have emitters every 6" because the cone of water distribution in my sandy soil is narrower than loamy or clayey soils.  I would think that one could use them around a tree, but that makes me  wonder:  Is it desirable to cover as much of the root system as possible?  I don't know.  By the way, I have read how water stress and heat can cause figs to drop fruit.  What about when the trees are bearing?  Is it possible to cause fruit splitting with irrigation?  We had a drought year last summer and it seemed like I got more splitting but my trees were only 2 years old.
Ken, the item number is 87865.  Yes the water hits the trunks.  I assumed that is no problem because it dries so quick.  Low hanging leaves were virtually no problem.  I set the two sprinklers so they went around them.  This did require a little extra 1/4 inch hose.



Subject: irrigation Replies: 19
Posted By: terowan Views: 1,178
 
There are probably a number of different solutions that work well for irrigation.  I live 5 miles from the Ocean so I get plenty of wind.  Even so, I have found that the 90 degree microsprinklers sold at Lowes do a great job even in 15 mile an hour winds.  This might be different with a different brand.  My sprinklers have lots of droplets coming out, not just mist.  At some point higher winds might not be so great.   I can always wait if I need to till evening or the next day or two when the wind dies down.  Scroll down to see second picture of my system that covers the entire root area thoroughly.
http://figs4funforum.websitetoolbox.com/post?id=4741434



Subject: EL Hardy Chicago Replies: 10
Posted By: terowan Views: 1,088
 
I have both the HC and Negronne (sold as VDB) from EL.  They both have done well for me in NC.  Last year I posted a picture of the second year bush of HC at this link:  http://figs4funforum.websitetoolbox.com/post?id=4841803
The first year I planted those two figs I got more than 75 figs.  Both taste great to me but the Negronne has a little more flavor.  HC is more productive and earlier so far.


Subject: New Bird Net Replies: 4
Posted By: terowan Views: 842
 
Bob, I got the netting from Seven Springs Farm.
noss,  The netting is softer so you can push it in and reach figs farther inside the bush to feel them.


Subject: New Bird Net Replies: 4
Posted By: terowan Views: 842
 
It's a good thing mockingbirds sing.  It buys them a lot of slack when they eat my figs, strawberries and blueberries.  I have been using the stiff black bird netting and it works well.  I needed to get some more and I found another type of netting so I bought some.  It is more flexible, less expensive, easier to install and allows you to squeeze figs away from the edge without removing it.  Every year we have a couple of mockers that have about 4 chicks and they raise them in our yard.  The youngsters are exuberant.  I have seen them hurl themselves at the net 30 times before giving up.  If the bottom is not perfectly sealed they get in.  It would be ok if they would focus on one fig at a time, but naturally they like to peck at new ones and destroy way too many.  One day this summer I noticed one of them flopping around the bottom of the new net.  I could see he was in trouble and one of the others was jumping on him like, "What are you doing?  Stop it!"  I went out there and he was stuck in the net.  It was hard to believe but even though the holes are only 3/4 of an inch wide, his head was stuck in one and one of his wings was all the way through to his shoulder in another hole.  I picked him up and realized I needed scissors.  I go get them and come back and pick him up again, holding him face down.  Immediately, he starts yelling at me, as if saying, "Let me go!".  No amount of reassuring talk would get him to shut up.  I could feel his chest heaving he was breathing so hard.  I worked as quickly as I could cutting the net.  I needed to flip him over to cut the net on his front side.  When I did, I guess he assumed it was all over because he started to cry like a big baby.  No more Mr Tough Guy.  When I finally finished I opened my hand, expecting him to burst into freedom but he just laid there.  I began to wonder if he was hurt but after about 10 seconds, he finally figured it out and flew off.  The bird net?  Well, I guess I'll have to see if it is a bird hazard or not.  Here is a picture of it on my 2 year old Negronne.




Subject: A Members Video Replies: 18
Posted By: terowan Views: 1,366
 
Very enjoyable video.  Well done Maggie.  Thanks for posting it Martin.  It makes me want to go to Europe for a fig tour during fig season.

Subject: Fig ID Help Please Replies: 5
Posted By: terowan Views: 603
 
Dennis, it is less watery than other figs that I've had.  (Saint Anthony, HC, Negronne, Celeste, BT).  Rich in flavor and sweet but more solid.

Subject: Fig ID Help Please Replies: 5
Posted By: terowan Views: 603
 
It does have a distinctive red fruity flavor.  Quite good really.  Sweet also.  Very different from the dark skinned ones I have like Hardy Chicago or Negrone.  Thanks.


Subject: Fig ID Help Please Replies: 5
Posted By: terowan Views: 603
 
This fig is growing in the ground in coastal North Carolina.  Thanks.










Subject: Hardy Chicago 2nd year pic Replies: 12
Posted By: terowan Views: 3,034
 
I really appreciate this website and forum.  Thanks Jon for all the hard work and others who contribute their knowledge.  This picture is what I was hoping for.  It is the second growing season for this Hardy Chicago and 3 other figs I planted mainly for food but also for fun.



Subject: My Greenhouse Visit Replies: 11
Posted By: terowan Views: 934
 
Martin, that's a great story.  I wonder how many other people are out there like Ted?

Subject: Freezing Figs Replies: 4
Posted By: terowan Views: 1,211
 
I understand frozen fruit is not for everyone.  However, for those that enjoy frozen blueberries, strawberries, muscadines etc. that come fresh from your own garden, I have tried it with my Saint Anthony figs and they are great.  No washing, no peeling just throw them in a freezer bag and make sure you when you eat them to let them thaw only halfway or so.  This is a good way to extend the eating out of season.  It tasted like a fig popsicle.

Subject: my best tasting fig so far Replies: 32
Posted By: terowan Views: 2,281
 
Bass, that is a beautiful looking fig.

Subject: Freezing Figs Replies: 4
Posted By: terowan Views: 1,211
 
I've read about freezing fresh figs.  Does anyone do it and how do they like it?

Subject: How Ripe Do You Pick???? Replies: 7
Posted By: terowan Views: 1,137
 
I like to pick my Hardy Chicago figs like row four.  Beyond that the flavor and sweetness starts to go down for me.  I find there is a narrow 2 day perfect picking stage.  They need to be much softer than a ripe peach, but not so soft they are liquidy.

Subject: Some Pictures Replies: 4
Posted By: terowan Views: 619
 
Oxankle, if you need assistance try this link for suggestions on pics courtesy of satelitehead.
http://figs4funforum.websitetoolbox.com/file?id=888121

Subject: Figs On the BBQ PICS Replies: 18
Posted By: terowan Views: 2,569
 
Looks great.  Inspiring.

Subject: Saint Anthony Figs Replies: 18
Posted By: terowan Views: 2,527
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fatnsassytexan
Hey Tim, could you possibly post a picture of the leaf? The fig matches an unknown yellow I have been trying to identify. Thanks in advance. 


Tim, I hope this helps.




Subject: Saint Anthony Figs Replies: 18
Posted By: terowan Views: 2,527
 
This is the first year of Saint Anthony from EL fruiting.  I planted it last spring 2009.  The wife and I like the taste and it bears fruit before our other trees so it extends the season.  It is a little mild but good and sweet and kind of has a honeydew flavor.  Definitely different than the dark skin varieties we have.


Subject: Watering in drought? Replies: 4
Posted By: terowan Views: 597
 
Ireiley, is your tree in the ground?  If so the hose is not likely to do a good job.  It will tend to channel down and not water all the roots.  Ideally, you would use a good system like the micro sprinklers in this post:  http://figs4funforum.websitetoolbox.com/post?id=4741434
If you don't want to do that, then a soaker hose or lawn sprinkler will do better than just the hose.  As to how long, every soil is different.  The key is to do it long enough to wet the soil down at least 6" deep.   Time it and then dig a little to find out how long for next time.

Subject: Yediveren fig from Turkey Replies: 13
Posted By: terowan Views: 1,676
 
Nice to see pictures of the figs and village life.  Thank you for sharing them.

Subject: I try to roots of fig trees and my village Replies: 2
Posted By: terowan Views: 700
 

I like to see pictures like these.  I wish more people from all over would share.  Thanks.


Subject: Irrigation system for planted trees? Replies: 14
Posted By: terowan Views: 1,215
 
Thank you and you are welcome Joseph.  I'm glad to help.  The micro sprinkler system is very easy to use and affordable.  In the vegetable garden I do use drip, but I've learned the hard way that perennials in the south need irrigation especially the first year and they do much better with it even after that.

Subject: Fig Links Replies: 2
Posted By: terowan Views: 585
 
That is very useful and fun.  Thanks

Subject: Irrigation system for planted trees? Replies: 14
Posted By: terowan Views: 1,215
 
This is the upgraded version that gets both sides equally.



Subject: Irrigation system for planted trees? Replies: 14
Posted By: terowan Views: 1,215
 
Thanks Sal.  It's a flexible system.  I've got them all over the front and back of my 1/2 acre yard.

Subject: Irrigation system for planted trees? Replies: 14
Posted By: terowan Views: 1,215
 
NCSU wrote an article suggesting the use of micro sprinklers instead of drip for blueberries.  They pointed out that more of the root system would get covered.  Since figs have extensive root systems, I went with that.  This is the second year for my in ground figs and the rain dissipated repeatedly.  The last good rain was on March 29 when we got 1.25 inches.  I have sandy soil and my figs are growing well with the main crop on the way.  You can buy micro sprinklers from Dripworks or other irrigation companies but I got mine at Lowes.  I use 1/2" mainline and I buried it a few inches for lawn mowing using a small mattock.  I waited until after a rain so the soil was soft.  The micro sprinklers only use 10 gal per hour.  In one hour the rain gauge says they put out .7" from my well.  The water is hard but I don't use a filter and it is fine.  The nozzles come in different patterns like half circle but I find the quarter circle best.  If you have low hanging leaves they can block the spray, so you might use two micro sprinklers.  Just get some extra 1/4 hose to replace the one that they supply and you can water both sides of the plant.

Subject: Southern Fig Growing Replies: 1
Posted By: terowan Views: 655
 
This bulletin has good concise info on such things as pruning and propagating for outdoor growers:  http://agnic.msu.edu/hgpubs/modus/morefile/hg87_79.pdf




Subject: Breba pics Replies: 20
Posted By: terowan Views: 1,758
 
These are pics of my Saint Anthony brebas taken on March 31.  I counted over 150 of them.






Subject: First Year Growing Figs Replies: 10
Posted By: terowan Views: 836
 
Absolutely.  I wish I could grow them all. :)  The soil we have is Norfolk Loamy Fine Sand.  It has a low CEC but it works, especially with amendments and irrigation.  The figs love it.

Subject: First Year Growing Figs Replies: 10
Posted By: terowan Views: 836
 
Jason, thank you for the advice.  The right varieties in the right environment is crucial.  Ed, I've settled on Apache for similar reasons.  I have seen it do well here in my area and it is really good.

Subject: First Year Growing Figs Replies: 10
Posted By: terowan Views: 836
 
Thank you.  I was thinking of getting a fig with yellow pulp for next year.  :)  This spring I'm gonna focus on a mulberry, persimmon, pomegranate, pawpaw, guava, blackberries and the kitchen garden.

Subject: First Year Growing Figs Replies: 10
Posted By: terowan Views: 836
 
After moving to NC, I discovered fresh figs at the local farm stand.  They were mild in flavor and sweetness, but juicy and good enough for me.  When the wife tried them she said they were, "Insipid".  After some research I found that some varieties might taste better, so I bought a Violet de Bordeaux, a Hardy Chicago, a Celeste and a Saint Anthony from EL.  We have loamy fine sand here so I installed a mini sprinkler irrigation system and the figs grew quite well.  The VdB grew over 6' tall in the first year.  I have since pruned them to shape, but the good news is we got over 75 figs from the HC and the VdB and they passed the wife test!  We were both impressed.  The C didn't grow and had to be replanted.  The SA only produced 2 figs late in the fall that didn't ripen well, but I have heard it produces on last years wood.  So we will see how they are this year.   Here are some pics of the VdB figs and the trees:





Subject: Fig Growing In the South Farmers Bulletin 1031 Replies: 6
Posted By: terowan Views: 860
 
I am not sure if this has been posted, but I found it interesting.  There are some old pictures of fig trees that have been pruned in orchard production.
http://books.google.com/books?id=EIwaAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA6&lpg=PA6&dq=how+to+grow+figs&source=bl&ots=Xvo5KL_UkT&sig=16DVXx7phcDifmwB-UW3jiOqYVI&hl=en&ei=EtR9S7TsAsSXtgfVmuTCBQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=10&ved=0CB4Q6AEwCTiCAQ#v=onepage&q=how%20to%20grow%20figs&f=false

 

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.