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Subject: Fig leaves curled/eaten Replies: 30
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 2,395
 
I think Martin has given you some good advice.  To me it looks like heat stress and/or under watering.  One way to test if you're under watering would be to give it a generous watering in the evening.  Check the tree again in an hour or so and see if the leaves look less curled and stressed.  7 to 10 days between waterings is a long time to go for a plant in a container, even in a half barrel.


Subject: Hardy Chicago? Replies: 27
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 2,985
 
Need to see pics of leaves to know more. There are several figs that look very similar to HC. I have a Marseilles VS and an unknown (Joe's Jersey) that both look very similar in leaf, fruit, and growth pattern to my HC. There seems to be a group of figs out there that look similar to the Hardy Chicago "type".


Subject: "Nero" and "Barnissote" - the same fig? Replies: 52
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 5,497
 
Brogiotto Nero is the Italian synonym for Barnisotte Black.  Bourjassotte Noire is the French synonym.  See Eisen and Condit for a lengthier list of synonyms.  Could be that Brogiotto Nero got shortened to Nero in some circles, but that probably happened for other Nero (black) figs as well.


Subject: Hardy and not so Hardy Replies: 21
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 2,220
 
Ox,

What zone are you in?


Subject: bird netting enclosure Replies: 45
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 4,745
 
Very impressive Ken.  It looks like you've put a ton of work into that enclosure.  Wish I had something like that!


Subject: My trip to Opelousas, LA and meeting the Fig man Mr. James Robin Replies: 10
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 2,031
 
Navid,

You can try to crop your pictures to bring them down to under 1 meg.


Subject: Touring the Wolfskill Experimental Orchard Replies: 4
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 923
 
Thanks for the info Jon.


Subject: Touring the Wolfskill Experimental Orchard Replies: 4
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 923
 
I will be in the Sacramento, CA area in April and would like to visit the Wolfskill Experimental Orchard in Winters, CA to view the fig trees there.  I know that Jon and some of the forum members have been there before.  How does one get permission to tour the orchard?  Is it open so that anyone can park there and walk around or do you need to make arrangements to enter and view the trees?


Subject: Breaking Dormancy Replies: 19
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 1,714
 
I just checked my Black Mission NL.  It is sprouting some new green buds near the base of the plant.  Every one of my fig trees has now broken dormancy.

Subject: Violette de Bordeaux Brebas Replies: 4
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 1,328
 
Some people think that it is good to remove fruit from small fig trees because it might help them put more energy into growing. I've found on some small plants that the presence of fruit does seem to slow down growth and on other small plants it doesn't seem to slow them down at all. Picking off the brebas will not do anything to help the tree break dormancy. If you want it to turn green and start growing try misting with water pretty regularly and give the soil a generous watering every few days. I'm in a hotter climate than you (I think). It's been in the 80's here for most of March. As it warms up the fig trees will start to grow.

Subject: Violette de Bordeaux Brebas Replies: 4
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 1,328
 
Thanks to a generous fellow fig grower I received a pretty good sized Violette de Bordeaux last fall.  It is growing some nice looking brebas.  I'm looking forward to tasting them when they ripen.  I have other figs with bumps on them that look like they might turn into brebas, but none of the other plants have brebas like this.

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Subject: Need an ID Replies: 18
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 2,179
 
Jason,

Not a fan of green figs I guess.

I prefer dark figs too.  I have a small Col de Dame.  I'm hoping that when it matures and produces fruit it will change my mind.


Subject: Breaking Dormancy Replies: 19
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 1,714
 
They disappeared.  Let me try again.

Subject: Breaking Dormancy Replies: 19
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 1,714
 
This is what I meant by leaf buds turning green and swelling.  Sorry the pics are pretty blurry.  My batteries ran out before I could take better shots.

1st pic = Marseilles VS with a bud just starting to open and leaf out.

2nd pic = Desert King leaf that has opened all the way.

3rd pic = Joe's Jersey with buds turning green and getting fat before they open.

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Subject: Breaking Dormancy Replies: 19
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 1,714
 
71GTO,

In New Jersey your in ground trees will not break dormancy until April or May.  From your photo it looks like the bud tip and branch are alive.  Those bumps will probably turn into leaf buds I think, but only time will tell.  In another 6 weeks or so and you will know for sure.


Subject: Breaking Dormancy Replies: 19
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 1,714
 
All of my figs have broken dormancy now except for Black Mission NL.  Even LSU Purple has come to life, pushing out new buds near the base of the plant.  My last three plants to break dormancy are, in order, Marseilles VS, Hardy Chicago, and Joe's Jersey.

Subject: Jersey Fig Replies: 7
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 979
 
Gorgi,

The fig you bought on ebay was different.  I only started propagating and circulating this fig last year.  I've been calling it Jersey, but I guess there is more than one fig going around by that name.  Sorry to add to the confusion of fig names.  I'll call this one Joe's Jersey.


Subject: Breaking Dormancy Replies: 19
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 1,714
 
Ken,

None of my plants were protected.  Also, all of my plants are small.  I moved to Arizona last September.  I had to drive out here from Massachusetts and fit all of my plants in the back of my car.  I had to prune down several to fit in the car, and most of them were first or second year plants anyway.  I think the combination of them being small plants and the surge of new growth that they put out when I arrived here last fall made them vulnerable to frost damage.  My theory is that Black Mission NL and LSU Purple are just more sensitive to frost than the other varieties.  The varieties that seem the most cold hardy somehow make their buds go into a deep dormancy... they are the ones that have buds that are alive, but are taking time to wake up.  For example, I observed back in January that Black Mission NL was swelling up green buds.  We had a couple of more frosts after that point, and now I don't see any living buds on the plant.  The plants that wait all the way until the spring are the most cold hardy.


Subject: Jersey Fig Replies: 7
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 979
 
Vito,

Yeah, I over fertilized it and it withered.  Lesson learned.  Young plants cannot handle full strength Miracle Gro, especially on a hot, sunny day.  Surprisingly it did survive, though it has remained small and stunted.  Thankfully another forum member gave me a much larger VDB last fall.


Subject: Breaking Dormancy Replies: 19
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 1,714
 
This was my first winter here.  Apparently it was one of the coldest in a while.  Several frosts this winter.

Subject: Early leapers this year Replies: 22
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 1,136
 
Nice pics Jason.  Your cuttings look good.


Subject: Jersey Fig Replies: 7
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 979
 
This fig is my unknown from a fig grown in the ground, unprotected in Clifton, NJ.  Very productive and hardy.  Not sure of the quality of the fruit.  This fig grew at the house I grew up at until I was 10 years old.  I remember eating lots of these fruit as a kid, but not sure about how the fruit would compare to some of the varieties I have tasted recently (Celeste, Marseilles VS, Hardy Chicago, LSU Gold, Black Mission, and Kadota).  I got 3 cuttings of this fig in 2010.  All 3 rooted.  Gave 2 away.  The one I have is growing well and seems very cold hardy.  As a kid I remember this fig producing 2 crops.  I will post pics this year when I have fruit.  Do the leaves remind anyone of a known variety?  In the pic it is the 3rd fig, all the way to the right.  Pics from 2010.  Figs are, in order, VDB (wrecked by over-fertilizing), Barnisotte, and Jersey.

Attached Images
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Subject: Breaking Dormancy Replies: 19
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 1,714
 
Here in Arizona my figs are breaking dormancy in this order:

1) LSU Gold (one green leaf, buds swelling)
2) Celeste JN (green buds leafing out)
3) Desert King (one green bud leafing out, other green buds swelling)
4) Violette de Bordeaux (multiple green buds swelling)
5) Col de Dame (two green buds swelling)

Other figs look like the wood and buds are healthy and will break dormancy soon.  They look like they will break dormancy in this order:

1) Barnisotte (green bud starting to swell)
2) Hardy Chicago (buds greening and looking alive)
3) Jersey (buds alive but not waking yet)
4) Marseilles VS (buds alive but not waking yet)

My last 2 varieties look like the wood has been killed by winter frosts and will have to grow back from the ground:

1) LSU Purple
2) Black Mission NL


Subject: Improved Kadota Replies: 3
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 894
 
Bass,

Here's a link to a publication about the fig orchards that were planted in Casa Grande, AZ back in the 1920's and 1930's with a special strain of Kadota known as the "Clarkadota".


W. Sam Clark sold farmers in Casa Grande his plants which were supposedly similar to the regular Kadota in most regards, but had a higher quality fruit.  The orchards didn't last for too long because Clark's Kadotas did not hold up well to the climate extremes of Arizona, along with other reasons outlined in the text.

Not sure if the improved Kadota that you've come across is the same one that Clark was selling back in the day or if it's something else.

Joe

Subject: BOURJASSOTTE GRIS Replies: 7
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 1,498
 
Thanks for the info Gloria.

Subject: Jumbo fig Replies: 15
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 1,817
 
Bass,

It has a big eye.  How do you think that will affect the performance of this variety?  Will it ripen well where there is a lot of rain or small insects?

Joe

Subject: A Text About Figs Replies: 11
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 1,259
 
Here's the answer: Les Figueres A Les Illes Balears (The Fig Trees of the Balearic Islands) by Montserrat Pons i Boscana.  This book is packed with information about fig growing.  The Balearic Islands (Mallorca, Menorca, Ibiza, etc.) are one of the richest and most diverse fig growing regions in the world.  I only wish that I read Catalan so that I could extract more of the knowledge contained in this book.  The photographs are excellent and it contains a ton of info on each variety that it covers.

Subject: A Text About Figs Replies: 11
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 1,259
 
Paragraph 10

"It is the mystery of the species, of the varieties, that ink has run for scientists and laymen in the course of history because they believed and fiercely defended that plant varieties were fixed, unable to be changed, as they were were created.  It took force of strength to show the error of this concept, and it contributed very much to Darwinian evolution and genetics."

This is the final paragraph of the first section of the introduction to this book.

Tomorrow I'll announce what book this is.

Subject: A Text About Figs Replies: 11
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 1,259
 
Paragraph 9

"After these remarks try to answer the question: why so many varieties of fig?  The direct reply is because the species forms hybrids, mutates and evolves, and the farmer takes advantage by empirically selecting each variety, preserving and spreading the offspring (graftings, cuttings, murgons [suckers?], etc.) for their needs."

Jason, I don't think that you'll find this text on the internet.  It is a book, and I know that other fig collectors on these forums have read it, although they probably just looked at the pictures because the language is uncommon and not too many people know it.  That's why I have to use Google Translate and my knowledge of Spanish and French to render it into English.

Subject: A Text About Figs Replies: 11
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 1,259
 
Paragraph 8

"The botanical beginning of the fig tree occurred through a natural process of crosses and adaptations that gave life to new forms, even in the wild, which came into contact with man in its evolutionary stage, and promoted both geographical expansion along with a biological diversification. Thus, over time, there formed many varieties of fig trees, over a thousand have been studied in the world and more than 160 on the Islands."

I'm surprised no one has figured this out yet.  This paragraph gives a big clue as to what this is.

Subject: A Text About Figs Replies: 11
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 1,259
 
Paragraph 7

"From the Middle East and southern Arabia, through Syria, the fig spread on the routes of the Mediterranean and was brought to the Western world.  Zohary and Hopt (2000), as proof of this fact, announced the discovery of traces of fig seeds in various areas of the eastern Mediterranean from the Neolithic period (7800-6600 BC).  From the Bronze Age were also traces of fig seeds in the Dead Sea basin (Hopt, 1983) and at Bab edh-Dhra (McCreevr, 1979).  In addition to the remains found, several written references reinforce the hypothesis of the beginning of fig cultivation in some areas of the eastern Mediterranean (Darby et al. 1977; Janick, 1979)."

Subject: A Text About Figs Replies: 11
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 1,259
 
Paragraph 6

"According to archaeobotanist Mordechai Kislev, the first Neolithic settlers of the Middle East had to grow figs for centuries, making them mutate and selecting them according to the most appropriate characteristics."

Subject: A Text About Figs Replies: 11
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 1,259
 
Merry Christmas!

Paragraph 5

"The conclusion was that the first clearly domesticated figs discovered date from 11,400 years ago. They were stored with acorns and wild oat and barley varieties, which to understand the survival strategy of the early Neolithic farmers was the joint exploitation of wild plants and initial fig domestication."

Subject: A Text About Figs Replies: 11
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 1,259
 
Paragraph 3

"Condit (1947) and Storey (1975) explain how in south-eastern Arabia it is possible to find forms of wild fig and caprifig."

And because it's so short...

Paragraph 4

"The archaeobotanical Israeli Ofer Bar-Yosef and his colleagues from Bar-Ilan University in Israel studied archaeological remains of nine carbonized figs in very good condition, from Gigal 1, one of the oldest Neolithic sites, located 12 km from Jericho in the Jordan Valley."

Subject: A Text About Figs Replies: 11
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 1,259
 
Paragraph 2

"According to Russian scientist Nicholas Ivanovic Vavilov (1951), the fig is native to the center of the Middle East, including the interior of Asia Minor, Transcaucasia, Iran and Turkmenistan lands. Other researchers, from Candolle (1883) to Jawkoski (1964), agree to say that one of the most important sources of fruit is in the Central Asia, as the case of pomegranate, cherry trees, the almond, etc. (Sanchez Monge, 1974)."

Subject: A Text About Figs Replies: 11
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 1,259
 
"Between the Cretaceous and Tertiary, 65 million years ago, there was a wealth of vascular plants. In the Tertiary (Paleocene, Eocene and Oligocene) predominated in the land extraordinarily warm weather uniform. For that reason stand out, among others, Morac (Ficus). These tropical flowers that are now coming to the Arctic region of Alaska and Greenland (Strasburger, 1986)."

This is the first paragraph.  Can you guess what this is?  I'll give you a hint: I typed it through Google Translate.

I'll keep posting a paragraph a day until someone figures it out.

Subject: Unknown Identified Replies: 5
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 1,272
 
Jon,

How's the quality of this fig?

Joe

Subject: Frost Sensitivity of Different Varieties with Photos Replies: 15
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 2,005
 
Kerry,

I feel for you and everyone else up north dealing with the weather this time of year.  It's weird living somewhere that is still green on December 1st.  One thing I won't miss about the northeast are those winters. 

Subject: Frost Sensitivity of Different Varieties with Photos Replies: 15
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 2,005
 
Jason,

You're the man!  I just went back and edited my original post with the instructions you gave me and the photos all appeared.  Thanks for the instructions.

Subject: Frost Sensitivity of Different Varieties with Photos Replies: 15
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 2,005
 
Ottawan,

I know, you're right.  But that's what I'm known by so I guess I'll keep it.

Subject: Frost Sensitivity of Different Varieties with Photos Replies: 15
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 2,005
 
Jason - Thanks for the hyperlinks.  Did you do that by inserting html?  I tried that when I was originally typing the post but in preview mode it didn't show the photos, so I decided just to put the http address.

Robert - That is the same Hardy Chicago I grew in Methuen, MA.  In 2003 I bought it from Raintree Nursery and planted it in my grandmother's yard in NY.  Then I took a sucker from that plant in 2007 and brought it to Massachusetts.  The plant I have now is a sucker that I dug up from the Massachusetts tree in August.  I too have wondered about there being different strains of HC out there.  I know at one point after I purchased the tree from Raintree they weren't offering HC for a period of time.  Then they had it available again at a later point.  I'm not sure if the HC they offer now is the same strain that they sold back in 2003.  I actually emailed them about it a couple of years ago but got no response.

Subject: Frost Sensitivity of Different Varieties with Photos Replies: 15
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 2,005
 
Gorgi,

I'm just reporting visible leaf damage after this first frost, which occurred a few nights ago.  Here in Arizona we may or may not get more frosts this winter.  All of the plants were in full growth mode except for Celeste.

Subject: Frost Sensitivity of Different Varieties with Photos Replies: 15
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 2,005
 
In September I moved to Arizona with my collection of figs.  My plants are still young and small.  I also acquired two new varieties since moving here.  I have a total of 11 varieties of figs.

The climate in Arizona is warm and figs do great here.  However the last few weeks have been unseasonably cool and in the last few days we have even experienced some frost.

Here are my observations on the frost sensitivity of different varieties.  This does NOT mean cold hardiness.  Instead I am documenting what I have observed regarding how easily the leaves of different fig varieties experience damage from frost.

The photos don't show the extent of the frost damage as clearly as looking at the plants in person, but they'll give a general idea of how the plant faired.

Here is my list, starting with the varieties that were MOST SUSCEPTIBLE TO FROST DAMAGE:

#1 Col de Dame


This is a young rooted cutting, so it may not be representative of how susceptible a mature specimen would be to frost.  That being said, Col de dame was the only variety to have total dieback from the frost.


#2 Black Mission


In my experience it lives up to its reputation of being very sensitive to frost and cold.


#3 Desert King


I expected Desert King to be more resistant to frost damage.  However there was extensive frost damage to the leaves all over the tree.


#4 Barnisotte


This is also a small plant started from a cutting, so it may not be representative of how it will do when mature.  It had significant leaf damage.


#5 LSU Purple


It had quite a bit of leaf damage.


#6 LSU Gold


This plant has been a slow grower for me.  It did produce nice sized fruit this year.  Many of the leaves yellowed up from the frost.  I'm not sure if they were really damaged by the frost or if the frost is just triggering the plant to go dormant.  I don't really see damaged green leaves, but the majority of the leaves have been yellowed by the frost.


#7 Violette de Bordeaux


This is the plant that I killed with fertilizer over the summer.  In the end it did survive, but is still quite small.  Surprisingly, it withstood the frost pretty well.  It does have some frost damage though.


#8 Marseilles VS


The plant has minor frost damage distributed here and there over the whole plant.  Overall it withstood the frost pretty well.


#9 Jersey (my unknown)


This plant experienced frost damage on the tip of one branch where it had recently put out a flush of new growth, but showed no frost damage anywhere else.


#10 Hardy Chicago


Hardy Chicago was unique in that none of its leaves wilted or wrinkled up from the cold.  However some of the leaves at the base of the plant turned a brown color in patches.


#11 Celeste


Celeste was the winner in my yard in terms of frost hardiness.  It is the only plant that was smart enough to go dormant in the cool weather this November.  The one yellow leaf was already turning yellow and getting ready to fall off prior to the frost as part of its dormancy process.  The one green leaf it has left was undamaged by the frost.


Hopefully this info helps those who live in areas with occasional frosts.  What have other growers found in terms of frost tolerance with their varieties?

Subject: question about CELESTE "types" Replies: 77
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 5,006
 
Grant,

I just sent you a private message.

Joe

Subject: Pomona Italiana F4F Link #726 Replies: 2
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 1,445
 
Jon has so many great links compiled on the figs4fun.com Links page.  This is one of the most interesting links, in my opinion.  It takes you to a webpage that contains the illustrations and descriptions that Giorgio Gallesio made of fig varieties that he was familiar with in Italy in 1817.  Gallesio also has illustrations and descriptions of other fruit besides figs.  The illustrations are beautiful.  The descriptions are lengthy and informative, and play an important role in the history of fig literature, as both Eisen and Condit referenced Gallesio and regarded him as an important source.  You access the full description by pressing the Full Article or Complete Text link on the bottom of the page.  Your web browser should be able to translate the page to English.  I'm only growing one of the varieties that he describes: Barnisotte Black (or Fico Brogiotto Nero as he calls it in Italian).  He also describe Dottato (Kadota? I believe) and Paradiso.  I'm not sure how many of the other varieties that he describes are still in trade.  In his description of Barnisotte Black he makes an interesting point.  He believes that Barnisotte Black is the same fig that Pliny the Elder (back in Roman times) called Ficus Africanus.  I'm not sure how he knows that with certainty, but if he is correct it is a cool link to the past.

Here's the web address: http://www.pomonaitaliana.it/pomona/fichi.htm  (If you have Google Chrome this is the best way to view it.)



Subject: Moving a larger in-ground fig tree Replies: 12
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 3,278
 
Arian,

What is the climate where you live? How harsh are your winters?

If you live some place with harsher winters and your growing season is over then maybe you can ask the seller if you can come back in the spring to dig up the tree right before it breaks dormancy.

Joe

Subject: Wolfskill Experimental Orchard - All the trees Replies: 4
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 1,291
 
Jon,

Thanks for posting.  Great stuff.

Joe

Subject: Recommendations for Zone 6? Replies: 6
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 839
 
Ken,

When I lived in Massachusetts the following figs did best for me: Hardy Chicago, Marseilles VS, and Celeste.  All of them are fairly early figs.  There are also many unknowns that are grown locally in zone 6 and do well.

Joe

Subject: Black Madeira Wanted Replies: 0
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 764
 
Anyone have Black Madeira cuttings to trade?

I have the following varieties that I can take cuttings from to trade with:

Black Mission NL 
Desert King 
Celeste 
LSU Gold 
Marseilles VS 
LSU Purple

Let me know.

Joe


Subject: Black Madeira fig Replies: 108
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 16,116
 
Anyone know of a source for Black Madeira other than UC Davis?

Joe

 

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