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Subject: Col De Dame White Replies: 23
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 2,638
 
Ken,

We still have a lot of growing season left.  Any small figs on your plants should still ripen.  What month do plants stop growing in Tuscon?  Here in the Phoenix area some of my fig trees were putting out new foliage into December.


Subject: My New Fiorone Di Ruvo Replies: 16
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 1,650
 
That's a nice looking plant.

Subject: You are probably a "fignut" if........ Replies: 72
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 3,787
 
LOL

Subject: Red Leaf Bud Replies: 4
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 584
 
Jason,

Thanks for bringing that old post back to mind.


Subject: Red Leaf Bud Replies: 4
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 584
 
Thanks Martin.

Subject: Red Leaf Bud Replies: 4
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 584
 
I've seen red buds on Violette de Bordeaux and Hardy Chicago before in the spring time.  My unknown that I call Joe's Jersey has a red leaf bud on it now.



Subject: VDB Doing Much Better in the Desert Heat Once Established Replies: 4
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 628
 
Ken,

Hope you get some good fruit this year.  I'm blessed because this tree was given to me last fall by another forum member from AZ.  It was only 1 or 2 feet tall because he had taken lots of cuttings from it, but it was a few years old and had a good root system.  It's been able to support lots of new growth this year.
  
My VDB seems to ripen fruit in crops.  It formed about a dozen brebas.  This current crop is about 3 dozen figs.  The last half dozen or so are still ripening up now.  It is putting out a flush of new figlets that will form a third crop later in the year.  I think there is still plenty of time for you to get figs from your tree.  This fig has a small eye, but it's open, so I've been trying to pick ripe figs before the ants get to them.


Subject: VDB Doing Much Better in the Desert Heat Once Established Replies: 4
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 628
 
Thanks Dan.  But the tree did all the work :)

Subject: VDB Doing Much Better in the Desert Heat Once Established Replies: 4
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 628
 
I want to post this update in case anyone living in a hot desert climate is considering growing Violette de Bordeaux.

Earlier in the year I commented in a post that VDB was showing signs of stress from the Arizona heat.  I was concerned that this variety wasn't going to do well here because the heat curled up its leaves quite badly.  Here's what the tree looked like back in May when it started to get hot:


Here is what the same tree looks like today:

This tree needed time to get established and develop its roots.  It has been a strong grower and is prolific in making fruit.  I have been eating figs from it for most of July.  The leaves of this variety are prone to curl when the humidity is low and temperatures are high, but it does NOT affect the performance of the tree.  This one is definitely a keeper in the desert.  The fruit is rich and sweet.


Subject: For Fla.-LSU Purple and ? Replies: 9
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 889
 
I would send the ones I thought tasted the best.


Subject: Barnisotte Replies: 25
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 2,547
 
Dominick,

Thanks for posting those photos and for posting on how your plant has been performing for you.  It's always interesting to see how a variety performs with different growers and in different parts of the country.  I used to live up in your neck of the woods (sort of) in the Merrimack Valley.  It would be cool to see down the road when all of these plants are larger and producing fruit to see how they all compare.

Here's a photo showing where I have been pinching figs off of my plant.  You can see from the stem bases left on the tree that this little guy has been trying to grow big figs that I keep having to pinch off:


Subject: Barnisotte Replies: 25
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 2,547
 
Dominick,

From the photos you've seen posted on this thread do you think your Brogiotto Nero is the same variety as UC Davis Barnissotte?  Can you post photos of your plant?


Subject: Barnisotte Replies: 25
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 2,547
 
Jason,

That is an interesting idea that a weakened plant will put it's energy into fruiting as a last resort to pass on its genes in case it does not survive. I'm also interested to see what others think.

As far as fig trees go, I've observed that each variety behaves somewhat differently in terms of how soon it produces fruit. For example, Hardy Chicago (a variety I'm pretty familiar with) has consistently put lots of energy into vegatative growth and needs to be pinched or allowed to put out lots of new growth for the year before starting to produce figs. The Barnissotte that I have has been trying to form figs since it was quite small, and I'm inclined to think that that's just a characteristic of this variety. TMC's 2 smaller plants are behaving in a similar manner to my plant, leading me to believe that it is typical for this variety to try to fruit as soon as it can. However, because Barnissotte produces large figs (I've seen the same thing with LSU Gold) a small plant can easily become stressed trying to grow and ripen fruit and that can negatively affect the plant's growth and lead to a stunted plant. I'm not sure why one of TMC's plants has no fruit forming on it, but I would guess that that plant has grown larger because it has not been diverting energy into producing fruit.

What do others think?

Subject: Barnisotte Replies: 25
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 2,547
 
TMC, 

Thanks for posting photos.  The leaf color on your plants is similar to the color on my plant's leaves.  My plant has tried to grow 8 or 10 little figs that I have had to pinch off.  I have a feeling that when mature it will be fairly productive.  The figs that it tries to grow have a thick stem and I can see that it will produce large fruit.  It could be that your tallest has grown the best because it has not put energy into figs.

As far as the spelling goes, Barnisotte and Barnissotte are the same variety.  The name is spelled differently in different sources.  On the figs4fun varieties page Barnisotte is listed as the primary spelling.  Ray Givan spells it Barnisotte as well in The New Fig Booklet.  UC Davis, Ira Condit, and Gustav Eisen all spell it Barnissotte, which is probably the correct spelling.


Subject: White Triana Replies: 23
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 3,605
 
Nice looking fig with a closed eye.


Subject: Barnisotte Replies: 25
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 2,547
 
Peg,

Thanks for the info.  The more I hear that other people are growing this variety the more I think my little tree will make it.


Subject: Barnisotte Replies: 25
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 2,547
 
Thanks for posting the photos.  Its good to see a healthy looking UC Davis Barnisotte.  Hopefully mine will get there.


Subject: Barnisotte Replies: 25
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 2,547
 
Thank you all for the advice.  I'm going to do more to help this little plant cope with the heat here.  I'm hoping that it will get through this phase and grow into a healthy tree.  Even though it isn't the prettiest looking plant it keeps putting out new growth so that gives me hope.

Dominick, I'd love to see photos of your Brogiotto Nero.  If you don't mind me asking, what was the source of your plant?


Subject: Barnisotte Replies: 25
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 2,547
 
Thanks for the responses.

It's good to know that R Watts has been able to grow a healthy tree of this variety.  Jason, what climate is he in?

My plan is to baby this little tree and to pinch every fig that it tries to form until it gets big and strong, and then let it start producing figs at that point.  So I won't taste any fruit from it until next year or the year after.  But from what I hear it will be worth the wait.

If anyone is growing a big healthy Barnisotte from UC Davis I would love to see pictures.

I know that Jon has an accession of Barnisotte called "1-23" that produces fruit for him, but I'm not sure if the original source of that tree is UC Davis or not.

Dominick, those are synonyms for Barnisotte, though there may also be other varieties that are referred to as Nero (which means "black" in Italian).

Subject: Barnisotte Replies: 25
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 2,547
 
I received several cuttings of Barnisotte (aka Barnissotte) from UC Davis last year and rooted them successfully.  I gave some of the rooted cuttings away but kept one for myself.  The one that I kept started out as a strong little grower until one hot day last August when it decided to collapse and look dead.  It managed to stay barely alive for the rest of the season.  This year it has been growing again, but the leaves have a yellowish color that is different from all of my other figs.  The leaves keep coming out different shapes.  They curl up in the heat and the plant just always looks stressed.  This plant has the worst case of FMV that I have seen.

Here is what it looks like now:

Obviously UC Davis has been able to grow a mature Barnisotte tree because they have one in their collection that they take cuttings from.  But I'm wondering, have any forum members been able to grow a large, healthy Barnisotte tree from a UC Davis cutting?  Is there hope for this little tree or will it always struggle and never prosper?

Thanks in advance for any feedback.



Subject: Any recommendations for dark figs? Replies: 25
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 1,582
 
Ken,

You and I have similar taste. I only grow 12 varieties and I actually have all of your dark varieties except for the Brown Turkey. Being from the North originally I have a soft spot for Hardy Chicago (which grows really well for me here in AZ).

Subject: 5 1/2 weeks Replies: 17
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 1,186
 
Ken,

Nice air layer.  How is the flavor of this fig?  I have a small one that will probably only start giving me fruit next year.


Subject: My fig collection so far... Replies: 7
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 978
 
Nice collection.

Subject: Question about VDB (with pics) Replies: 8
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 1,138
 
My VDB does display that large elongated leaf type.  It is not the most typical leaf type, but it does sometimes show up:


More typically the leaves are smaller and look like this:


Subject: Suckers Replies: 17
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 1,193
 
Suckers are branches coming off of the tree below the soil line.  But the part that is below soil grows its own roots.  If you cut the sucker deep enough in the soil you can get its roots and treat it like a rooted cutting.

Subject: Rust?? Replies: 10
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 1,158
 
Rust usually eats up a leaf along the edge of the leaf not along the veins.

Subject: Suckers Replies: 17
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 1,193
 
You can dig suckers up at this time of year and pot them up.  I have done this before and it worked.  It helps to start the potted suckers in the shade and work them back into full sun slowly.  It only works if you can dig up suckers with some decent roots.

Subject: Fig trees at Italian restaurant in NJ Replies: 15
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 1,155
 
The leaves in the first photo look similar to my Hardy Chicago from Raintree and also to my unknown from Clifton, New Jersey.

Subject: I'm under attack Replies: 53
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 3,441
 
Does it really matter that much if they abandon the nest? At least the problem will be gone and you won't have to use a firearm or bb gun near your home.

Subject: I'm under attack Replies: 53
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 3,441
 
I would pick up the nest and move it somewhere else farther away from the garden.  I would wear a hat and work gloves and lots of clothes and have a helper with a broom.

Subject: Who to ask? Replies: 4
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 774
 
Hi.  I have been growing figs in Arizona since last year.  There are several long time forum members who are in Arizona.  Hopefully some of them will chime in.  You can also check on the other forum.

So far I have found my best growers to be Desert King, Violette de Bordeaux, LSU Purple, Black Madeira, Joe's Jersey (my unknown), and Hardy Chicago.  Even Barnisotte seems to like it here.  All of these figs have continued to grow in the heat.  Most are growing figs.  Other varieties have not done as well for me so far.  Not sure if they just need more time.


Subject: Figs Coming Full Force Replies: 21
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 1,262
 
Nice looking harvest.

Subject: HC from Lowes Replies: 37
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 2,867
 
The leaves and fruit on my Hardy Chicago look similar to the HC that Martin has.  It is a good fig, especially to be grown in the North.  The leaves on those young "Chicago Hardy" plants from Lowes look like they could be the real HC, but I guess only time will tell as the plants mature and put out more consistent leaves and you finally get fruit.  Good luck!  But I still prefer to get my plants from a trusted source instead of playing box store roulette :)


Subject: 2011 Growing Season in the Low Desert Replies: 7
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 1,721
 
Ken,

My Desert King hasn't fruited for me yet.  It was still small this spring, but I am hoping to get fruit next year from it.  My source is Burnt Ridge Nursery.  I figure if it gives me a good early season crop it might be worth it.

All of my figs are planted in the ground in full sun with no shade.  They use a lot of water.  I fill the basin that they are in every second day and I mist them a few times a week.  It seems like as long as they have enough water they will continue to grow in the heat.

Subject: 2011 Growing Season in the Low Desert Replies: 7
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 1,721
 
Thanks Jason.  I did that and the photos are showing.


Subject: 2011 Growing Season in the Low Desert Replies: 7
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 1,721
 
I'd like to post an update on how different varieties are growing here in Mesa, AZ.  Some varieties seem to grow better in the desert heat than others.  Here are MY BEST GROWERS SO FAR:

Desert King grows like a weed here.  This one has added almost 3 feet of new growth so far this season.


LSU Purple died back last winter and has put out this new growth so far this year.


Joe's Jersey (my unknown) is growing into a dense, bushy plant.  It appears to be one of my most drought tolerant plants, and naturally shades its base.


Violette de Bordeaux curls its leaves in the heat, but grows vigorously despite of it.  Strong grower and very productive.


Black Madeira is still small but is putting out dark green, healthy looking foliage.  It does not seem to mind the heat at all.


Figs have formed so far on the following varieties:
Violette de Bordeaux (good grower, good fruit producer)
LSU Gold (average grower, good fruit producer)
Celeste (poor grower, average fruit producer)
LSU Purple (good grower, good fruit producer)
Barnisotte (too small to tell yet)



Subject: Dubai Replies: 10
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 946
 
The desert heat can stress fig trees.  I moved to Arizona from Massachusetts last year.  My fig trees show more signs of heat stress here than in Mass.  What I have observed so far is this: cultivars that are hardy and tough enough to survive borderline cold climates also seem more tough and resilient to the desert heat.  Marseilles VS, Hardy Chicago, and similar figs are strong healthy growers for me here in the desert.  I would stay away from Violette de Bordeaux and other varieties with long slender leaves, because the heat seems to affect them more.  Also, I've been pleasantly surprised by Desert King.  It's my strongest grower here by far.


Subject: A Few Breba Pictures Replies: 13
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 1,029
 
Martin,

That Santa Cruz Dark looks nice.  Have you tasted the fruit before?  How is it?


Subject: Violette de Bordeaux Breba Replies: 4
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 729
 
John,

I can't say whether Raintree or EL's is better.  I only have this one VDB tree, and it came from a forum member, so I'm not sure how it compares to EL's or Raintree's.  All I can say is that it is a good grower and puts out a lot of fruit.  The tree is still small but it had about a dozen brebas on it this spring.  Once the weather turned hot down here I pinched off all except for this one, so that the plant could focus on growth and the main crop.


Subject: Violette de Bordeaux Breba Replies: 4
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 729
 
I picked this breba today from my VDB.  It was small, but sweet.   It had a good "fig" flavor.  Overall it was nice for a breba.


Subject: Any effect from street lights ? Replies: 3
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 764
 
Kerry,

I've wondered this myself. I live on a corner lot and there's a street light on the corner that keeps half of my yard lit through the night. So far I haven't noticed any difference between the plants growing on either side of the property, but I haven't lived here too long, so I'm wondering if there will be long term effects on growth, fruit production, etc.


Subject: Sad day for me Replies: 37
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 1,418
 
Gene,

So sorry for your loss.


Subject: Origin of Hardy Chicago Type Figs Replies: 11
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 2,157
 
I know that some fig growers believe that Hardy Chicago and similar type figs come from the Mount Etna region of Sicily.  I am very interested in these figs, as HC was the first fig variety that I ever purchased.  I also grew up in house that had a HC type unknown (Joe's Jersey) growing in the yard.  I also have Marseilles VS and I would consider it to be a similar type of fig.  I don't grow Sal's but have heard that some consider it to be a similar type.  All of these figs are tough, healthy growers, with small fruit.  They have a strong fig flavor, but are not as sweet as some other figs.  HC, MVS, and my unknown all have a similar leaf and growth habit.  I observe that in addition to being cold hardy, these figs also grow very well in the Arizona heat.  Their leaves do not curl from the heat as some other varieties do for me.

Recently I was reading Gustav Eisen's The Fig: Its History, Culture, and Curing.  Eisen describes the figs that are grown in different regions of the world.  When talking about the figs of Italy, he says that the most important fig regions are in the south of the country, basically from the area around Naples down to Sicily.  He says that the figs in the Naples area are "small, averaging about one-third the size of the Smyrna figs, while in sweetness they are hardly equal to the Smyrnas."  He goes on to say the further south one goes the larger and sweeter the figs become.  He says that in Sicily the figs are large and sweet.  He says that the figs grown around Palermo, Sicily are "the largest figs produced in Italy, almost equaling those of Smyrna in size, while exceeding them in sweetness".  All of this is found in his book on pages 40 - 41.

After reading Eisen's descriptions, it seems to me that these HC type figs are much closer to his description of the figs grown around Naples than of the figs in Sicily.  Naples is also where so many Italian families who immigrated to the U.S. originally came from.  Is it possible that these HC type figs come from the Naples area instead of from Sicily?  Besides MVS, which was brought back to the U.S. by a returning soldier from WWII, all of these figs were unknowns growing in Italian neighborhoods.


Subject: Some Figs Making Progress Replies: 2
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 577
 
Ken,

Me too.  It has a bad case of FMV, but last year it gave me my best tasting figs of 2010.  I only moved out here in September, so I have yet to see how it takes the full heat of the summer.


Subject: Some Figs Making Progress Replies: 2
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 577
 
Recently I posted and showed some of the heat struggles that a couple of my fig trees have experienced.  But other figs seem to love the heat.  And even ones that look heat stressed still have quite a few clusters of growing figs.

Here's a Col de Dame that was rooted as a cutting by another fig grower last year.  I put it in the ground over the winter and this spring I thought it had died, it looked so sick.  Now it looks good.

Here's a Black Mission that was damaged down to a few inches over the winter and now is bouncing back.

Here is a cluster of young figs on my VDB.

Here's LSU Gold putting on figs:

Here are some Celeste figs forming:


Subject: Some Varieties More Likely to Look Heat Stressed? Replies: 18
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 1,315
 
I only have an inch or 2 of mulch.  Sounds like I need some more mulch.  But why are the plants still growing and putting out fruit?  It's like they look stressed but keep growing anyway.

Subject: Some Varieties More Likely to Look Heat Stressed? Replies: 18
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 1,315
 
Figured it out.  Had to look up an old post where Jason explained to me how to do it.


Subject: "Blackened" Madeira Replies: 34
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 2,716
 
Ken,

I would avoid fertilizing a stressed out young  plant, especially now that it's getting hot outside.  It could kill the plant.


Subject: Some Varieties More Likely to Look Heat Stressed? Replies: 18
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 1,315
 
How do I get these photos to show?

Subject: Some Varieties More Likely to Look Heat Stressed? Replies: 18
Posted By: FrozenJoe Views: 1,315
 
Here in Arizona the temperatures are up in the 90's.  All of my figs are continuously putting out new growth.  I believe that all of them are healthy.  But some of them look stressed by the heat, while others do not.  Why is that?  Is it that some varieties just look more stressed by the heat, regardless of their health?  I am wondering if other growers have this same experience.  If not, then I must be doing something wrong.  I water my plants about every 3rd day at this time of year.  I give a generous amount of water, filling up the basin that the plant grows in.

Violette de Bordeaux grows like a weed and has lots of figs on it, but looks stressed.

LSU Gold is the same, growing great, but just looks stressed.

Desert King is growing great too but no signs of stress.

Marseilles VS also growing great but no signs of stress.

Joe's Jersey growing great too with no signs of stress.

Why are some showing stress?  Would pinching off fruit make a difference?


 

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