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Subject: Fig ID Replies: 4
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 142
 
Definitely not Olympian!

Based on the leaf it might be Neveralla or Beall (or another of many varieties with similar leaf shape).  Read Condit's written descriptions of Figs with that color of skin in "Fig Varieties: A Monograph" (available as a downloadable PDF from my website) and see if you can match your Fig to any of his descriptions.

Happy Growing,   kiwibob, Seattle

See my Website:   http://sites.google.com/site/kiwifruitsalad2

Subject: Zone 5-7a breba figs Replies: 11
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 382
 
Breba production is NOT a function of pinching Main Crop figs off of San Pedro or any other type of Fig!  The tree either naturally produces an abundant Breba Crop or it doesn't.

Desert King is known worldwide for its Breba Crop.

Here in Seattle the only Fig that produces more than Desert King is the Caprifig "Gillette" (aka Croisic) in its Profichi Crop.

Brunswick produces few Brebas but their size and "figgy" flavor (here in Seattle, but I'm told Brunswick Brebas aren't fit for birds to eat in New Jersey due to their climate while ripening) make up for lack of quantity.  Brunswick is also one of the most Cold Hardy Figs.

Negronne (aka Violette de Bordeaux) produces a moderate Breba Crop.

Olympian (a variety found in Olympia Washington) appears to be very promising for Breba Production based on the past two years in a pot and the quantity of Brebas currently forming for 2016.

"Dan's Favorite" and "Gene's Vashon" (possibly the same variety) both produce moderate Breba Crops of very good tasting Figs.

None of the other varieties in my collection (over 30, mostly in pots, many which have not yet produced any Figs) do any more than a Moderate Breba Crop.

Celeste is effectively Unifera in Seattle.

Best to look at Ira Condit's "Fig Varieties: A Monograph" (available as a downloadable PDF from my website) and read his descriptions of crop production and rule out any Varieties he says produce few or no Brebas.

Happy Growing,   kiwibob Seattle
See my website:  http://sites.google.com/site/kiwifruitsalad2

Subject: Pro-Mix HP vs Sunshine Sphagnum Peat Moss Replies: 10
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 406
 
For what it's worth, my experience with ProMix vs. Sunshine for rooting Figs is I used ProMix until they started adding a fungicide to the mix at which time my rooting success went way down.  Mycorrhiza is a fungus that is necessary to initiate rooting and my opinion is the ProMix fungicide may inhibit Mycorrhiza.  I switched to Sunshine #1 which is a peat & perlite mix and my Fig rooting success went back up to the level I was used to with the old version of pre-fungicide ProMix.  Depending on your particular rooting technique, you may experience different results than I have had with these two mixes.

Happy Growing,   kiwibob, Seattle

Visit my website:  https://sites.google.com/site/kiwifruitsalad2

Subject: Danny's Delight *Requesting Pics* Replies: 15
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 369
 
In response to Greenfig's question:

"Is the Danny's Delight and Dan's Favorite the same fig?
They look the same and loosely have the same name.

I really liked it. It is not a pretty fig but doesn't split and tastes good."


The answer to that question is ABSOLUTELY NO!  Dan's Favorite is from Dan Ackerman at Brinnon on Hood Canal in western Washington.  Danny's Delight (Delite) is from somewhere in the upper midwest and named after a different Danny.  To the best of my knowledge, these two varieties don't look even similar to each other.  See my website:  https://sites.google.com/site/kiwifruitsalad2
page F3.1 for a photo of Dan's Favorite Breba, and page F6.1 for a Breba on the tree.

Happy Growing,   kiwibob, Seattle

Subject: Updating my website, Fig input wanted Replies: 7
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 329
 
I made the decision over the weekend to go with 9/page and have since deleted the page with 6/.  The objective is to convey the most comparative information with the greatest ease, thus 9/page so folks don't have to scroll!

I'm still working on the website revisions and will be for several days at least, but I'm not happy with the results.  Initially my goal was to reconstruct the site so it could be downloaded as a PDF but Google Sites works such that I can't see the entire page width when I "print as a PDF".  My alternate site on Wordpress now has a gallery function (which it didn't have when the site was created) where multiple photos can be assembled.  I'll try updating that site in the near future to see if my goal works on it.

kiwibob   Seattle

Subject: Updating my website, Fig input wanted Replies: 7
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 329
 
The purpose of my original post was to solicit feedback about which layout of the Fig photos is most informative, the 9/page or 6/page.  I'm still looking for that feedback!

jdsfrance,  Condit lists "Dauphine" as a San Pedro type Fig with description starting on page 365 in his "Fig Varieties: A Monograph" which is downloadable as a PDF from my website.  Condit describes the leaves as being 3-5 lobed and coarsely crenate.  My Dauphine came to me second-hand from a F4F member whose original source is UC Davis.  The leaf came from a very immature tree shown on page F6.2 FIGS ON THE TREE so it probably isn't the dominant leaf form one would find on a mature tree.  As always, I question the accuracy of varietal names and in this case the Breba shown doesn't match photos I have seen of "Dauphine".  Time will hopefully resolve my skepticism but it is encouraging that the Main crop "Dauphine" that started forming this year on the tree shown on page F6.2 has aborted along with two more on a similar sized clone.

Michael,  Got your e-mail and I'm still working on my website revisions.  I hope that planned changes will answer most of your questions.

kiwibob   Seattle

Subject: Updating my website, Fig input wanted Replies: 7
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 329
 
I'm updating my primary website and want to know F4F Member preferences for the layout of the Fig Variety pages.  The question is should I use the layout on page F3.1 or F3.2 MEDIUM COLORED FIGS with 9/page or 6/page respectively?  My inclination is to use the 9/page layout as it allows more varieties to be visually compared on a single page.  All photos may be viewed individually at a larger size for detail scrutiny by clicking on the photo.

Please check out those two pages and if you have a strong opinion of which is better, send me an e-mail telling why you prefer one over the other.  Don't reply to this thread so we don't overload the Forum with chatter.

http://sites.google.com/site/kiwifruitsalad2

Happy Growing,   kiwibob  Seattle

Subject: Sharing a few Figs Replies: 4
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 417
 
Yes, some Caprifigs are edible including Gillette.  It must be fully ripe or it tastes like rubber.  When fully ripe (the meat must be translucent instead of white) it has a sweet marshmallow flavor and lots of seed crunch.  The one shown in both photos is about a day or two shy of being fully ripe!

Other Caprifigs are apparently too dry to be palatable, a function of keeping the pollen dry enough to be transferred to other Figs by the Fig Wasp.

Happy Growing,   kiwibob

Subject: Sharing a few Figs Replies: 4
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 417
 
Slavi stopped by today and we shared a few Figs.  In both photos they are left to right, top row:  Bajtra Bajda, Peter's Honey.  Middle row:  Negronne, Vashon Violet (aka Brunswick), Olympian, Gene's Vashon.  Bottom row:  Gillette, Desert King.  All are Brebas but Gillette which is a Profichi Caprifig.  The stone tile background is 30.5 cm x 30.5 cm (12" x 12").

5050.C.FIGS.WHOLE.JPG 

5055.R.C.FIGS.SLICED.JPG 

Most of these Figs were picked a day too soon to avoid critter predation so they were not at their peak of ripeness and flavor.

Enjoy :)   kiwibob, Seattle

See my website:  http://sites.google.com/site/kiwifruitsalad2


Subject: Fig Sources For The PNW Replies: 11
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 710
 
Try my website: http://sites.google.com/site/kiwifruitsalad2

Get connected with the other Figs4Fun Members in the Pacific Northwet!

Happy Growing,   kiwibob, Seattle

Subject: Sky Nursery Sale - For WA Growers Replies: 1
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 231
 
Sorry to hear you got trees at the sale!  Chicago Hardy, Petit Negri, Brown Turkey, and Peter's Honey have no business whatsoever being sold in the Puget Sound Region.  If you didn't mean Petit Negri but meant "Negronne" instead, the latter is OK (but there isn't a Petit Negronne variety).

Look & learn before you leap.

kiwibob, Seattle

See my website:  http://sites.google.com/site/kiwifruitsalad2

Subject: Food for thought Replies: 2
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 315
 
Saw this sandwich in the Deli case yesterday and gave it a try :)  Lots of Ham and Potato Torpedo Roll but it needed more of all the other ingredients, especially the Jam!

kiwibob, Seattle

3008.HAM.FIG.SAN.JPG 

Visit my website:  http://sites.google.com/site/kiwifruitsalad2


Subject: OT Anyone growing Kiwi Berries? Replies: 16
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 645
 
Aaron,

Try Edible Landscaping of Afton Virginia, One Green World of Molalla & Portland Oregon, or Raintree Nursery of Morton Washington.  All do mail-order and have websites.  Hardy Kiwis (Actinidia arguta) are easy to grow if you start right before planting, build your trellis stout, and don't plant them in full sun!  They can take 3-9 years before first bloom with each sex having a mind of its own.  Patience is key!

Unlike it is advertised, Issai probably isn't self-fertile.  Don't waste your time with it.

Happy Growing,   kiwibob, Seattle

Visit my website:  http://sites.google.com/site/kiwifruitsalad2

Subject: Trying to understand East and West coast zones Replies: 16
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 779
 
Here in the Great Pacific Northwet the USDA Climate zones are irrelevant.  The attached weather forecast for Seattle from February 1-5, 2015 should explain our weather quite clearly ;)

SEATTLE.FEB.1-5.2015.png 

Happy Growing,   kiwibob, Seattle

Visit my website:  http://sites.google.com/site/kiwifruitsalad2


Subject: Varietal confusion leaves me speechless! Replies: 11
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 800
 
Aaron,

We need to get past the differences and look at the similarities!  Juvenile trees are not the right place to look.

Can you send me a copy of or link to your Synonym database?

Happy Growing,   kiwibob, Seattle

Subject: Varietal confusion leaves me speechless! Replies: 11
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 800
 
Aaron,

Too many folks look at the differences in leaves on an individual tree, and they will find that each leaf is unique!  We need to concentrate instead on the similarities to find the dominant leaf pattern on a given variety for this to become a useful tool for Fig ID.

How is your synonym project coming and do you have it posted online or can you send me a PDF?

Thanks,   kiwibob, Seattle

Subject: Varietal confusion leaves me speechless! Replies: 11
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 800
 
FIG.6.TILES.GRAPE.GRP2.F4F.JPG
FIG.6.TILES.HAND.GROUP.F4F.JPG 
FIG.6.TILES.MAPLE.GROUP.F4F.JPG 
FIG.6.TILES.MAPLE.GRP2.F4F.JPG 
FIG.6.TILES.MIX.BT.GRP.F4F.JPG

FIG.6.TILES.MIXED.GROUP.F4F.JPG 
FIG.6.TILES.SPOONBILLS.F4F.JPG 

So a picture is worth 1,000 words!

Around 1903, Hugh Starnes proposed a method of identifying Fig Varieties by their general leaf shape.  These are some photos I took in October that include most of the varieties in my collection but many of them are still too young to develop a dominant leaf form.

In my opinion, Starnes' idea has a great deal of merit and should be refined as a tool to assist in Varietal identification.

Worth noting in the above photos are the similarity of the leaves I chose for California Brown Turkey & Black Jack!  They add credence to FigLink1110, the genetic fingerprinting of the UC Davis collection in which Malli identified the two as synonymous.  Also worth noting is the Adriatic leaf which clearly resembles one on the F4F Varieties page for Adriatic but doesn't resemble Grasa's "Adriatic" leaves at all.  I believe her "Adriatic" is really a mislabeled Desert King!

Happy Growing,   kiwibob, Seattle

Visit my primary website:  http://sites.google.com/site/kiwifruitsalad2


Subject: Fruit Flies and Figs. Yaks. Replies: 17
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 1,378
 
Paully,

Check this link: http://www.agf.gov.bc.ca/cropprot/swd.htm

Spotted wing drosophila (SWD). Drosophila are the common Fruit Flies, also called Vinegar Flies, and have long been the subject of genetic studies in Biology.

Ain't no use fighting it! Thanks to "Globalization" and Climate Change, the SWD is here to stay :(

As I understand the history, it was identified in Japan in the late 1930's as a soft fruit pest by a guy named Suzuki (hence also called Suzuki Fly). It was sighted in California some time in 2008 and had made it to Abbotsford BC by 2009. It also arrived here at my place in Seattle in 2009 affecting my blackberries and caused me to wonder why the Fruit Flies were swarming on the berries on the vine when they had only worked on rotting fruit for all time prior to 2009! SWD is apparently one of only two species out of over 200 species of drosophila that affect fresh fruit, in the case of SWD for the female to lay its eggs.

Do the math: apparently SWD females are capable of laying about 350 eggs and are on a 7-10 day life cycle depending on temperature so a single fertilized female unleashed at the start of a growing season lays her eggs, if 100 females emerge and get fertilized then lay their eggs... by the end of a growing season there will be about one TRILLION SWD in the area!

SWD affects pretty much all soft fruit including berries, plums, cherries, smooth skinned Kiwis, and of course Figs (both Breba and Main crop)! Some folks use traps made from clear plastic bottles with caps on, filled with apple cider vinegar and poke a few nail sized holes in them so the female SWD can enter, then drown in the vinegar. Hang those traps away from the fruit you want to protect and empty the dead flies daily. I don't do anything because I understand the math and realize it is futile!

So what's to say about SWD: Got Protein?

You do now ;)

Keep on Growing, kiwibob, Seattle


Subject: Ripe Main crop Olympian Fig Replies: 12
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 861
 
Paully & Grasa,

I already have Grantham's Royal in my collection and can give Grasa a rooted tree.

I am attaching a PDF of my current Fig Collection.  CUT = got as a cutting, ROOTS = got as a rooted cutting, GAL = in gallon container, SM POT = pot up to 5 gallon size, M POT = pot up to 15 gallon size, LG POT = pot over 15 gallon size, EARTH = planted in the ground.  The first date listed (from left) indicates the way I obtained the variety, and dates to the right indicate when I potted/planted the variety and container size.

If anyone outside of Seattle is interested in any of these varieties, PLEASE DON'T ASK ME FOR THEM AS MY NURSERY IS CLOSED UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE DUE TO AYLS (ACTINIDIA YELLOW LEAF SPOT) AND I WILL ONLY MAKE PLANT MATERIAL AVAILABLE TO PERSONAL FRIENDS LIVING WITHIN THE CITY OF SEATTLE WHERE AYLS IS PRESENT IN EVERY LOCATION!!!

Visit my website:  http://sites.google.com/site/kiwifruitsalad2

Keep on Growing,   kiwibob, Seattle
pdf PSK.FIG.COLLECTION.2014.PDF    


Subject: Ripe Main crop Olympian Fig Replies: 12
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 861
 
IMG_0974.FUZZY.DK.JPG 

Desert King from September 2010.  Enough said ;)

kwibob, Seattle


Subject: Ripe Main crop Olympian Fig Replies: 12
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 861
 
I think it's both a Fig and a Mushroom ;)  I have some old photos of a Desert King that got moldy and hairy that look like Rip Van Winkle's beard after his nap!

all for a good laugh,   kiwibob

Subject: Ripe Main crop Olympian Fig Replies: 12
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 861
 
It's not often that we get ripe Main crop Figs here in the Pacific Northwet!
1700.OLYMPIAN.FIG.MAIN.JPG 

This one was Really RIPE ;)

kiwibob, Seattle


Subject: Grasa's Unknown and Mead Fig composite photos Replies: 8
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 567
 
Gorgi,

I really wanted to do comparative photos of the leaves of all 30+ varieties of my Figs but we have had such a bad year for FMV and other issues that affect the leaves that I decided to wait until next year and hopefully better weather so the leaves won't look sick!  If it works next year, the photos will show either six leaves or 12 leaves on stone tiles (3 tiles x 2 tiles or 4 tiles by 3 tiles) and be organized as best I can by dominant leaf shape like Brunswick, Stella, Negronne, & Petit Negri together as they all have long slender lobes.


I still hope some F4F Forum Member has a known variety that has the characteristics of Grasa's Unknown (purple) so we can eliminate the "Unknown" and call it by its proper name.

Thanks,   kiwibob

Subject: Grasa's Unknown and Mead Fig composite photos Replies: 8
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 567
 
Gorgi,

It's the latter purple one, not her Desert King which was erroneously given to her as "Adriatic".  The whole Main Crop Fig at lower left shows the sunny side but the side toward the stone tile has the characteristic purple/green striping of this variety in the second link.  I chose the sunny side because the other side was checked which isn't characteristic of the variety.  The Brebas on the right side are from my August 12, 2014 photos.

Much of this varietal confusion can be eliminated by reading Ira Condit's "Fig Varieties: A Monograph" which is downloadable as a PDF from my website:  http://sites.google.com/site/kiwifruitsalad2

Thanks,   kiwibob, Seattle

Subject: Grasa's Unknown and Mead Fig composite photos Replies: 8
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 567
 
Grasa was kind enough to bring me a couple of her Main Crop Grasa's Unknown and Mead Figs together with some leaves to photograph and taste so here they are!

GRASA.UNK.COMPOSITE.JPG GRASA.UNK.LEAF2.FINAL.JPG MEAD.FIG.COMPOSITE.JPG 

The GRASA.UNK.COMPOSITE.JPG and GRASA.UNK.LEAF2.FINAL.JPG both show her Main Crop Figs at the lower left and her Brebas (thanks to digital magic :) on the right side for comparison.  The LEAF2 photo shows a leaf from my tree with about 90 degree angled pointed Basal Lobes that I find unique on Grasa's Unknown variety but not in my other 30+ varieties.  Maybe some Forum Member has a variety with that characteristic and can identify its varietal name.

Does Mead produce Brebas or just the Main Crop?

Both tasted OK but since we don't get Main Crop Figs on many varieties to ripen here in Seattle (and those usually in "hot" years like we've had in 2014) I would rather grow reliable Breba producers with stronger flavor.

Happy Growing,   kiwibob, Seattle


Subject: OT: Do you grow Hardy Kiwis? Replies: 9
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 603
 
Thanks to all Hardy Kiwi growers who have replied to my initial post.  Many more data points are still needed so if you grow Hardy Kiwis, please take the time to reply via the Blog whether AYLS is ABSENT or PRESENT in your plants.  http://kiwifruitayls.wordpress.com

Happy Growing,   kiwibob, Seattle

Subject: OT: Do you grow Hardy Kiwis? Replies: 9
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 603
 
Thanks to all who have replied thus far to this post.  Many more data points are needed to get a better idea of where AYLS is PRESENT or ABSENT.  If you are growing Hardy Kiwis, please got to the Blog Map page and reply.  http://kiwifruitayls.wordpress.com

Thanks,   kiwibob, Seattle

Subject: OT: Do you grow Hardy Kiwis? Replies: 9
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 603
 
If you grow Hardy Kiwis, please check the Blog I started in an attempt to find out why Actinidia leaves are getting random shaped Yellow spots/blotches, and report whether the spots (AYLS) are ABSENT or PRESENT in your plants via the Blog Map page (not on this F4F Post).  See the Blog:  http://kiwifruitayls.wordpress.com
If someone you know grows Hardy Kiwis but isn't a Member of this Forum, please send them the Blog link.

Every location reporting will help us narrow the possibilities and focus on the most likely cause.  Of special interest to me is the Michigan Peninsula including Detroit due to AYLS presence at two locations in the Toronto area.

Happy Growing,   kiwibob, Seattle

Subject: August 12, 2014 eats Replies: 3
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 336
 
Thanks to Grasa for providing the NOT "Peter's Honey" & "Grasa's Unknown" Figs shown in these photos :)

Figs from an August 12, 2014 tasting I had with my Neighbors.  Since "taste" is subjective, I'll just say that they were all nice!  The NOT "Peter's Honey" is what is commonly sold here in the Pacific Northwet as "Peter's Honey" but it doesn't match the description that you see in Nursery Catalogs, most likely due to a labeling error at the Propagating Nursery!

[8-12-2014] 

[SLICE] 

Top Row L-R: "Desert King", "Tilbury's Turkey", NOT "Peter's Honey", "Grasa's Unknown", "Stella".

Middle Row L-R: 2 "Dan's Favorite", "Vashon Violet" (aka "Brunswick"), "Violetta".

Bottom Row L-R: "Beall", "Negronne", "Petit Negri", "Lattarula", "Gillette".

 

All Figs shown are of the Breba Crop except the Caprifig "Gillette" which is of the Profichi Crop.

Photos are on a stone tile 30.5 x 30.5 cm (12" x 12") .


Enjoy,   kiwibob, Seattle

Visit my Website:  http://sites.google.com/site/kiwifruitsalad2

Subject: Trio (Adriatic, DK, Green Ishia) sampling. Replies: 20
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 825
 
Grasa, Malli lists Ischia Green as being a genetic match with DFIC 208, Paradiso, and Monstrueuse.  Condit describes Brebas of Adriatic (aka Verdone), Ischia Green (aka Verte, aka Strawberry), Paradiso, and Monstrueuse as all having green skin and violet or violet tinged meat.  It is easy to understand how someone could confuse the four varieties if they looked only at the Figs and didn't pay attention to differences in the leaves or tree growth habits.  We give Varieties names to be able to distinguish their different characteristics.  Unfortunately, tags get lost, names get confused, and people pass the mistaken identity on to others when we exchange plant material.

I have seen estimates that 4% of all plants sold in the U.S. Nursery Trade are mislabeled!  I suspect that Figs have a much higher error rate than 4%.  All we can do is try to correct the mistakes when we become aware of them instead of passing on the mistaken identity.  In my own Fig collection there are at least 33 different named Varieties, some of which are no doubt the same as others but only time and observation will tell if they are unique or the same Variety.

Imagine how disappointed you would be if you got an "Adriatic" that produces no Brebas!  Well, I have one that I rooted in 2001 and it has yet to produce a single Breba.  But that would be consistent with Condit's description of Adriatic.  So yes, correct identification of Varieties is important.

Bob (rcantor), I don't know if Condit was the first to call the layer of a Fig between the skin and the pulp "meat" but I am willing to use the term as it has been in common use since before 1955 and makes communication much easier when we all speak the same language.

I ate my first 2014 Breba of Desert King Friday and Lattarula yesterday.  Neither were fully ripe but I just couldn't wait!

Good Eating,   kiwibob, Seattle

Subject: Trio (Adriatic, DK, Green Ishia) sampling. Replies: 20
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 825
 
Bob, that's not "pith" that you refer to, the correct name in Fig terminology is "meat" (see my website and download the PDF of Ira Condit's "Fig Varieties: A Monograph").  Pith is the center of the limb and can be either solid or lamellate (as in most Kiwi species).  See the recent F4F posting that includes a magnified photo of a Borer that is in the pith.

Grasa, the "Adriatic" you show with white/amber pulp isn't Adriatic which has "dark strawberry" pulp.  Also, the "Green Ischia" likely isn't Green Ischia per Condit's description: "meat thin, violet; pulp strawberry."  Sadly, such is the status of Fig Identification.  The Genetic Fingerprinting study done by Malli Aradhya of the UC Davis collection (FigLink1110.pdf) indicates a number of varieties that match other varieties of different types (as a Common type matching a San Pedro type) which just can't be explained other than that the original plants were misidentified when they were added to the UC Davis Collection!

Aah, the joy of the "Fun" part of Figs ;)

Happy Growing,   kiwibob, Seattle
http://sites.google.com/site/kiwifruitsalad2

Subject: Big deal! Replies: 3
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 353
 
Thought I would try posting this old photo from August 23, 2010 of the biggest Fig I've harvested.  It's a Brunswick Breba that weighed 190 grams.  Unfortunately it had spoiled inside leaving little to enjoy eating :(

Enjoy,   kiwibob, Seattle

[WHOPPER]

Subject: PNW Fig Friends BBQ Meeting Replies: 23
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 967
 
Slavi,

Many Thanks for a great time and feast Saturday :)

I'm already looking forward to another Fig Gathering when the rest of us have ripe Brebas, the opportunity to meet Paully (and his Salmon), and a great Fig Feast.

Those Figistas who didn't get in the photo because they had to leave before someone suggested a photo were Scott (pyxistort), Denny (who named the Olympian Fig) & Audrey McGaughy, and TahomaGuy2. The guy on the right side of the picture is really kudzu9, not TahomaGuy2.

Happy Growing (and Eating), kiwibob, Seattle

http://sites.google.com/site/kiwifruitsalad2

Subject: PNW Fig Friends BBQ Meeting Replies: 23
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 967
 
Bump :)

kiwibob, Seattle

Subject: king fig or desert king? Replies: 1
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 266
 
Yes.

kiwibob, Seattle

Subject: SE Washington Replies: 5
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 352
 
Where in SE Washington?  I know of one Brunswick tree in Walla Walla that is about 90 years old.  Brunswick is one of the few varieties that can tolerate the Winters once established.  Unless you are willing to grow them in pots and move the pots indoors over Winter, all I can do is wish you luck because you'll need it!

Happy Growing,   kiwibob,   Seattle

Subject: Longue d'Aout breba Replies: 31
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 1,351
 
Art,

Can you post photos of the dominant leaf form of Longue d'Aout?

Thanks in advance,   kiwibob,   Seattle

Subject: Grasa Adriatic breba Replies: 24
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 1,097
 
I agree with Herman!  All of your posted photos of "Grasa Adriatic" are of Desert King.  Desert King is a San Pedro type Fig which on occasion can ripen the Main Crop without Caprification.  If the Main Crop aborts, it will confirm without a doubt that Herman is correct.

Happy Growing,   kiwibob, Seattle

Subject: Grasa Adriatic breba Replies: 24
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 1,097
 
Ira Condit had the following to say about Verdone (aka Adriatic) in "Fig Varieties: A Monograph" Hilgardia, 1955 p.408 (available as a downloadable PDF from my website,  http://sites.google.com/site/kiwifruitsalad2 ):

"The following account of Verdone is based on observations of commercial plantings
and of individual trees over a long period, and of trees fruiting in the collection of
varieties at Riverside since 1932.

Trees vigorous, densely branched, with broad, spreading crown. (Plate 2.) (See also
Condit, 1941a, fig. 15.) Terminal buds green. As already pointed out (Condit, 1947,
p.103), leaves of Verdone trees appear a week or ten days before those of Sari Lop and
may, therefore, be seriously injured by late frosts, while leaves of the latter escape
injury. Leaves medium, decidedly glossy above, stiff in texture, mostly 5-lobed; upper
sinuses deep, moderately broad, lower sinuses fairly shallow; base broadly subcordate
to truncate; middle lobe spatulate, with upper margins coarsely crenate, lower margins
entire; leaf mosaic fairly conspicuous, with occasional twigs having badly distorted and
dwarfed leaves, as shown by Condit and Home (1933). (See also plate 13.)

Breba crop very small, or none (crop of 1953 was unusually heavy as the result of
frost damage to terminal buds and the resultant pushing out of lateral fruit buds); figs
medium or above, oblique-pyriform, mostly with prominent neck, up to 3/4 inch long;
stalk thick, sometimes swollen, up to 1/4 inch long; ribs narrow, inconspicuous; white
flecks fairly numerous and prominent; eye medium, scales greenish, with scarious
margins; skin thin, colored greenish violet by the underlying dark-violet meat; pulp
dark strawberry; flavor rich; quality good. (Plates 7; 16, D.)"

I haven't spoken to Grasa yet but it looks to me like her "Adriatic" may not be correctly identified!

My "Adriatic" obtained as a cutting in 2001 has yet to produce a single Breba, has glossy upper sides of leaves, 5-lobed, base truncate, middle lobe spatulate, and FMV is conspicuous.  Can you post a photo of the dominant leaf form of your "Grasa Adriatic"?

Happy Growing,   kiwibob, Seattle

Subject: Osborne Prolific? Replies: 15
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 1,655
 
eboone,

One of the Testers in the Puget Sound Regional Fig Variety Test has an "Osborn Prolific" that produces no Brebas.  That would be consistent with Condit's description of "Rust".  The "Osborn Prolific" controversy hasn't gone away.  It would be much better if folks selling or giving away "Osborn Prolific" would drop that name and call their trees by the unique variety name.

Hey, we all make mistakes.  Please cite specific instances of wrong descriptions by Condit in his "Fig Varieties: A Monograph".

kiwibob,   Seattle

Subject: Osborne Prolific? Replies: 15
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 1,655
 
The question is did jujigirl buy an "Archipel" or a "Rust" Fig tree?  Both have been called Osborn Prolific since some time before 1955!

It's always nice to know what you are buying, particularly here in the Puget Sound Region where only the Breba crop ripens in August-September but few if any Main crop Figs will ripen.  According to Condit, "Rust" seldom produces Brebas while "Archipel" produces a good Breba crop.  Osborn Prolific is an irrelevant name as it doesn't identify the Variety (cultivar)!

Happy Growing,   kiwibob   Seattle

Visit my website:  http://sites.google.com/site/kiwifruitsalad2

Subject: Osborne Prolific? Replies: 15
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 1,655
 
I wish folks wouldn't use the name "Osborne Prolific" (Osborn Prolific) as it applies to two different cultivars!  Here is what Condit listed in his 1955 "Fig Varieties: A Monograph": 

Osborn = Archipel, 414

Osborn Prolific (Rust) (C), 420

Osborn’s Prolific = Archipel, 414

It would help to know which variety people are talking about when they say
"Osborne Prolific" (Osborn Prolific)!

kiwibob,   Seattle


Subject: any info on Lampeira? Replies: 82
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 3,304
 
I have a theory that we DON'T have Lampeira in the US!  My theory is based on Condit's "Fig Varieties: A Monograph" page 368, and Malli's "FigLink1110.pdf" where his genetic fingerprinting shows a match of "Adriatic DFIC 032" and "Lampeira DFIC 192" (see the family tree on the right side top of group G9).  Such a genetic match is in theory impossible as Lampeira is a San Pedro type and Adriatic is a Common type Fig!

My conclusion from this genetic "match" and others in Malli's study, cross-referenced with Condit is that there are a number of improperly identified/labeled cultivars in the UC Davis/Wolfskill collection.  Since most of us accept cuttings/plants we obtain as being correctly labeled, it's easy to see how misinformation gets passed along.  Other examples in Malli's study that support my conclusion can be found with Archipel DFIC 007 & Drap D'or DFIC 250 (bottom of group G1), and Brunswick DFIC 034 & Doree DFIC 213 (bottom of group G3).  See what Condit says about Doree based on Starnes' observation!  The Doree issue has been ongoing for over 100 years.

If this isn't enough confusion for you, check Malli's matches for Brown Turkey (bottom of group G5) and it's pretty clear why I believe "Brown Turkey" is the most misidentified Fig variety available in the US.

Have Fun :)   kiwibob, Seattle

Subject: Any Up-Dates On The Olympian Fig Replies: 16
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 2,058
 
I got an Olympian Fig tree from Burnt Ridge Nursery several years ago.  Currently in a large pot.  It's very slow growing but might provide some cutting material (about two sticks) this year if anyone in Seattle wants to try rooting them.

The original tree is still there in Olympia but I don't know the location.

Happy Growing,   kiwibob   Seattle

Subject: Another good reason to visit Seattle Replies: 4
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 502
 
Last Sunday was a great day here in Seattle.  It wasn't raining, that blue stuff that hides behind the clouds tried to peek out occasionally, the motorized crazies who create our perpetual traffic congestion were conspicuously absent from the streets as far as the eye could see, and many Pedestrians were out and about enjoying not having to fear for their lives crossing the streets.

I spent the afternoon helping a North Seattle resident prune her Kiwi vines and was rewarded afterward to treats at Seattle's finest beverage establishment "Chocolati".  We went to the Greenwood location (one of four including their Downtown Seattle Public Library location) and I had my favorite, the Europa hot chocolate.  They don't make it with cocoa powder, nor do they use syrup.  It's made with melted chocolate (sometimes called drinking chocolate).  The Europa is their own blend of dark European style chocolate and the experience is akin to drinking a dark chocolate bar :)

Drinking a Chocolati Europa is sufficient reason to plan a trip to Seattle, but the day was topped off with a special treat from their Truffle selection, the chocolate-stuffed dried Turkish Fig in the attached photos!  Who could ask for anything more?  Enjoy :)

9428.CHOCOLATI.FIG+.JPG

9432.CHOCOLATI.FIG+.JPG 

9440.CHOCOLATI.FIG+.JPG 

kiwibob,   Seattle

PS:  If you plan a trip to Seattle, try early September when our local Breba crop is ripening.  The Europa tastes as good in Summer as it does in Winter!


Subject: 2013 Fig Wars Replies: 8
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 737
 
jdarden,

On the plate at lower left is a "Brunswick", the 3 green Figs with strawberry interior exposed are "Desert King", and the green Fig at right is a "Lattarula".  All are Brebas as we rarely if ever get enough heat to ripen any Main Crop Figs.

Raccoons have gotten under the net twice since the netting was finished on August 12, and some unidentified likely nocturnal critter has torn/cut the net along the top rail of a fence in 4-5 places since then.  I've set 2 rat traps and one live trap.  Bait in the live trap has disappeared twice but it hasn't been tripped, and both rat traps were sprung this morning but caught nothing.  The netting has worked but only against bird predation.  It's time for a giant wire cage!

kiwibob,   Seattle

Subject: 2013 Fig Wars Replies: 8
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 737
 
The 2013 annual Fig Wars with the critters are on!

8230.WALLA2.3DK.LAT.JPG

8234.VV.DAMAGED.JPG

8240.VV.DAMAGED.JPG

8243.VV.DAMAGED.JPG

All pics except the one on the plate are of Figs attacked AFTER netting was set and secured over 3 trees!








I'm losing :(

Happy Growing & eat your Figs before the critters get em,
kiwibob,   Seattle

Visit my website:  http://sites.google.com/site/kiwifruitsalad2

8230.WALLA2.3DK.LAT.JPG 8234.VV.DAMAGED.JPG 8240.VV.DAMAGED.JPG 8243.VV.DAMAGED.JPG


Subject: Perhaps a male!-Seattle Unknown Fig Replies: 15
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 966
 
Wrong leaves, so it's NOT Desert King!  Where is the tree Grasa?  Time to stop by my place again.

Happy Growing,   kiwibob, Seattle

Visit my website:  http://sites.google.com/site/kiwifruitsalad2

Subject: Spring in Seattle! Breba count Replies: 5
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 527
 
Nichole,

The tree will make the decision for you!  If it's capable of carrying the Brebas to maturity, it will.  If not, they will abort.

kiwibob,   Seattle

Subject: Event:Growing Figs in the Pacific NW Replies: 5
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 852
 
Scott,

Hildegard is a friend of mine.  If the venue is suited to projection, she will show the Fig half of a Kiwi/Fig Powerpoint presentation that I developed.  We often team up and do the presentation together.  She approaches it with the enthusiasm of a home gardener while I provide the technical information.  I won't be attending this one.

Have fun if you decide to attend the Event.

kiwibob

 

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