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Subject: dessert king Replies: 28
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 1,913
 
Dan,

No.  I customarily prune my Fig trees just as they are starting to come out of dormancy in mid-April when I take cuttings for propagation.  The pruning is done to maintain trees at a manageable size, take cuttings, but more importantly to stimulate new growth below the pruning cuts which will become one-year-old wood the following year.

I'm not sure it really makes a difference but if I prune right after fruiting, any new growth that starts then will be very tender and could be lost to freeze damage during the Winter.  If I pruned then, my cuttings would be significantly less viable as I don't have bottom heat.

kiwibob,   Seattle

Subject: dessert king Replies: 28
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 1,913
 
Dan796,

Breba crop Figs are borne on last year's growth (1 year old wood) while Main crop Figs are borne just above the leaf petiole on current year's growth.  I haven't seen any Brebas formed on, nor have I seen any mention that they can form on two year old or older wood.  Desert King (aka King) is clearly a San Pedro type Fig but as Condit noted in "Fig Varieties: A Monograph" (downloadable as a PDF from my website), it sometimes ripens the Main crop without caprification!

Here in the Pacific Northwet, we only get Brebas to ripen and Desert King is our "workhorse" with its abundant Breba crop.

Happy Growing,   kiwibob   Seattle

Visit my website:  http://sites.google.com/site/kiwifruitsalad2

Subject: Crops Breba vs Main Replies: 8
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 1,048
 
Dave,

Visit my website:
http://sites.google.com/site/kiwifruitsalad2

The Fig section is a good place to start for folks with growing seasons where the Main Crop won't ripen!  When I prune, I take out the tallest one of every 3 branches back to or near its source, leaving the other 2 to produce Brebas.  Here it is best to manage Figs as multi-trunked shrubs rather than trees.

Nordland?  Probably not a good choice.

Happy Growing,   kiwibob, Seattle

Subject: What type of fig tree do I have? Replies: 14
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 2,076
 
For a quick answer about the variety, try going back to where you bought it and ask the seller.  Hopefully they will know.

Happy Growing,   kiwibob, Seattle

Visit my website:  http://sites.google.com/site/kiwifruitsalad2

Subject: Ever heard of an "Appalachian Brown Turkey" Replies: 2
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 562
 
Dominick,

Thanks for the input.  Until yesterday I thought it was Celeste but had expected to see more checking on the skin and even smaller fruit.  After looking again at Celeste on the Figs4Fun Varieties, your identification appears to be correct.  Are the leaves of your Celeste extremely pubescent?  Prior to yesterday, Chicago Hardy (Hardy Chicago) had the most pubescent leaves I was aware of but this Celeste has it beat.

Happy Growing,   kiwibob   Seattle

Subject: Ever heard of an "Appalachian Brown Turkey" Replies: 2
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 562
 
Another ID question, has anyone ever heard of an "Appalachian Brown Turkey" Fig?  What is its true variety name?  The attached photos were taken today of Main Crop Figs of this variety.  It is one of very few varieties that has any possibility of ever ripening Main Crop Figs here in Seattle.  The tree produces no Brebas and has very pubescent leaves that are either 3 or 5 lobed.  The stone tile is 12"x12" and the two sliced Figs weighed between 22 to 28 grams.

If anyone can ID this variety, please let me know and tell me which of the three photos on the stone tile you think is most representative of the variety so it can be posted on my website.

Thanks in advance,   kiwibob   Seattle

Visit my website:  http://sites.google.com/site/kiwifruitsalad2

Attached Images
jpeg +6084.MAIN.CROP.FIG..JPG (85.71 KB, 47 views)
jpeg ++6086.MAIN.CROP.FIG.JPG (111.75 KB, 41 views)
jpeg ++6090.MAIN.CROP.FIG.JPG (124.01 KB, 45 views)
jpeg ++6097.MAIN.CROP.FIG.JPG (94.86 KB, 34 views)


Subject: Spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii Replies: 17
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 1,172
 
I've been told it was first sighted in California in 2008 and by the end of 2009 had reached Abbottsford BC!  The buggers were on my blackberries in 2009 and I had no idea why fruit flies had taken a sudden liking to ripening blackberries.  They now go after every fruit with a soft skin, all berries, cherries, plums, Hardy Kiwis (all smooth skinned Actinidia species), and sadly Figs :(

This year I've found at least three larvae crawling on ripe Figs within a few hours after picking the Figs and bringing them indoors.  They really suck as they initiate premature spoilage in the fruit and there is NO effective control for them except to do as a friend a few blocks away has done and enclose his raspberries in a cloche or no-seeum netting once they have been pollinated through the end of their season.  Unfortunately that isn't feasible for Fig trees.

As the saying goes, "resistance is futile".  Get used to them and many more pests to come thanks to "Globalization" and Climate Change.  If they can survive your climate, they will eventually become established.  Thus far mankind has failed to eradicate so much as one insect pest despite dumping many millions of tons of toxins into the environment.

As far as those great "insecticides" are concerned, can you say Rachael Carson?  Best to leave them on the shelf in the stores that push them.

kiwibob,   Seattle

Visit my website:   http://sites.google.com/site/kiwifruitsalad2

Subject: Negronne Breba (VdB) photo wanted Replies: 1
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 450
 
I'm still looking!

kiwibob

Subject: Negronne Breba (VdB) photo wanted Replies: 1
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 450
 
I'm looking for a photo of a Negronne Breba on the tree to use on a picture tag.  Currently the best I have is the one posted on page 15 of my website:
http://sites.google.com/site/kiwifruitsalad2

If you have a better Negronne photo that I can use in exchange for some cuttings of varieties in my collection, please let me know.

Happy Growing,   kiwibob   Seattle

Subject: My Brown turkey-type? in south sweden zone 7 Replies: 18
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 860
 
flaxss,

It looks like you have two problems: Winter cold-hardiness, and lack of Summer heat.  Here in Seattle's maritime climate we have the latter, and some of the Puget Sound Regional Fig Variety Test members in rural areas have both.  You can do something about cold-hardiness by protecting the Figs or potting them and storing them indoors over Winter, but you can't change the lack of Summer heat (unless you grow your Figs in a greenhouse)!

Go for varieties that produce good Breba crops (most San Pedro types, and a few Common types), and forget the varieties that claim to be cold-hardy like Chicago Hardy (Hardy Chicago) which produced one single Breba Fig in 2008 for me during the 12 growing seasons I've had the tree.

Pierre Baud may be able to help you find the varieties you need to grow Figs successfully in your maritime climate.

Happy Growing,   kiwibob,   Seattle

See my website:  http://sites.google.com/site/kiwifruitsalad2

Subject: ID this Breba Replies: 7
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 800
 
ID still needed!

kiwibob,   Seattle

Subject: ID this Breba Replies: 7
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 800
 
I would like confirmation of this variety if anyone can identify it from the attached photo of a 5-lobed leaf and its first ever Breba crop Fig.  The tree produces both 3 & 5-lobed leaves but I can't say that either is the dominant form.  The lone Breba fell a bit prematurely after being pecked at through netting.

I call it "Wade" after the person who gave me the tree but really want to call it by the correct variety name.

Happy Growing,   kiwibob
Seattle

See my website:  http://sites.google.com/site/kiwifruitsalad2

Attached Images
jpeg WADE.COMPOSITE.JPG (217.97 KB, 89 views)


Subject: What to do with no hope main crop? Replies: 3
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 438
 
demonick,

Let them go until dormancy, then pick all of them off when the leaves aren't in the way.  Some times if left on the tree over winter they act as points for mold to set in and can cause minor die-back of the limb.

kiwibob,   Seattle

Visit my website:  http://sites.google.com/site/kiwifruitsalad2

Subject: LSU Gold,Purple, HC, Negronne, Brunswick, Peters Honey Replies: 5
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 864
 
Nice pics :)  Please continue to post varietal photos in a similar fashion.  It's also important to note whether the Figs are Breba or Main crop.  Your Brunswick appears to be a Breba.  Are the others Brebas as well?

In 2002 I bought a 12" x 12" stone tile from Home Depot, thought it was Travertine but it is probably Limestone.  The tile makes it very easy to crop the photos and they are always to a known scale for size comparison.  See my website:  http://sites.google.com/site/kiwifruitsalad2

Good eats,   kiwibob
Seattle

Subject: Lampeira Replies: 11
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 1,704
 
Leon,

Here is what Condit said in his 1955 "Fig Varieties: A Monograph"

"Tree moderately vigorous. Leaves small; deeply 3-lobed.

Brebas large, about 3-1/2 inches long and 2-1/2 inches broad, pyriform, with prominent neck and medium stalk; average weight 102 grams; eye large, open, scales violet; color greenish yellow, tinged with violet on sunny side; skin glossy, rather thick; meat thin, white; pulp rosy amber, with violet shade toward the eye; seeds rather numerous. Quality excellent; appearance fine.

Second-crop figs medium or below, about 2 inches long and 1-1/2 inches broad, pyriform, with short, thick neck; eye partly open, scales rosy; skin delicate, checking at complete maturity, green flushed with violet; pulp deep red; seeds small. Second crop negligible without caprification."

Since you don't indicate whether the pictured Figs are Breba or Main Crop, it's very hard to tell.

I suspect that it ISN'T Lampeira!  If you look at Malli Ardhaya's FigLink1110, the genetic study of the UC Davis collection, it raises the possibility that Lampeira in their collection is mislabeled.  Please see his "Family Tree" at the top of Group 9 where it is listed as a genetic match with Adriatic, clearly an impossibility as Adriatic is a Common Type Fig, and Lampeira is a San Pedro Type Fig.

Further, reading what Condit says in his Monograph about Lampeira, I get the impression he couldn't find any in California in 1955.

Hope this helps.

Happy Growing,   kiwibob
Seattle

See my website:  http://sites.google.com/site/kiwifruitsalad2

Subject: Sun or heat - which is more important for ripening? Replies: 10
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 1,054
 
Marches,

Welcome to the Forum.

Heat is more important than Sun.  It sounds like your Climate is similar to ours in Seattle.  Compare your growing season temps with ours and if they are close, focus on the San Pedro type Figs and those Common Types that produce quite a few Brebas as only the Brebas will ripen outside of a greenhouse.

To see what works well in Seattle's Climate/Microclimate, visit my website:  http://sites.google.com/site/kiwifruitsalad2

Please send me a PM if your Climate is similar to Seattle so we can discuss various cultivars.

Happy Growing,   kiwibob
Seattle

Subject: Dan's Favorite Replies: 3
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 811
 
Quote:
I know of a Danny's Delite, could this be the same variety?


NO!

Dan's Favorite works very well around Puget Sound where only Brebas ripen but may or may not perform similarly in other Climate/Microclimate conditions.

Visit my website:  http://sites.google.com/site/kiwifruitsalad2

Enjoy,   kiwibob
Seattle


Subject: Condit vs Vallese Replies: 15
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 1,396
 
I can't speak for anyone else but I give Condit credit because HE EARNED IT.

Here is part of what Storey, Enderud, Saleeb, & Nauer said about Condit in their 1977 publication "The Fig":

    "When he joined the University faculty in 1912, universities were not large and departments were very small, consequently teachers had to be “professors of universal knowledge”.  In addition to teaching botany and horticulture, he did research and wrote on various horticultural subjects including avocado, loquat, olive, and others, as well as his beloved fig.  His published works add up to 230 titles.  His illustrated book “The Fig”, published in 1947, has long been out of print and copies are eagerly sought at rare book stores.

     In his time he became — and still is - the world’s foremost authority on figs.  Agriculturists from all of the fig growing countries of the Mediterranean region and Middle East wrote to him or came to see him personally, seeking information and advice.

     In 1956, he introduced a hybrid fig into the trade with the name ‘Conadria’.  Unlike all other fig cultivars which were selected somewhere, by persons known or unknown through many centuries, it, insofar as is known, is the first to have been created by a plant breeder with certain objectives in mind.  Later he introduced ‘Excel’ and ‘Flanders’."


In his 1955 Hilgardia Publication "Fig Varieties: A Monograph" (downloadable as a PDF from my website http://sites.google.com/site/kiwifruitsalad2 ), Condit published descriptions of over 650 Fig varieties then in production around the world, included 10 b&w photos of specimen trees, 1 b&w photo showing leaves of several varieties, 7 color photos of ripe Figs, and 15 pages of b&w illustrations of the ripe fruits of some varieties.  Many of his descriptions were from personal observation when he had specimens to observe, but many more relied on the published descriptions of numerous other authors including Vallese.  Whether Condit personally translated their works or relied on translations by others is questionable.

Condit was constrained by 20th Century printing technology including that dreaded four-letter-word, CO$T which limited his ability to include photographs, especially color photos.  With digital cameras, internet technology, and digital information storage capability, we now have the opportunity to expand on the work of Condit and those before him.  Imagine re-printing the text of "Fig Varieties: A Monograph" together with color photos showing dominant leaf form, exterior and interior of both Breba and Main Crop Figs of each variety, and adding those varieties which have been introduced since 1955 :)  It is possible, volunteers gladly accepted!  Such a cooperative effort might even be able to solve the mysteries of improperly identified varieties, of which there are way too many.

Happy Growing,   kiwibob, Seattle

Subject: Speaking of Fig leaves, ID requested Replies: 1
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 597
 
The attached photo is of a Fig tree that was given to me last year, named "Bryce" after the owners of the parent tree.  The person who gave it to me knew nothing about the Figs it produces.

In my collection of about 25 varieties, this leaf shape is unique.  Until it bears its first crop, leaf shape is all I can show.

Any idea what variety it is?

Visit my website:  http://sites.google.com/site/kiwifruitsalad2

Happy Growing,
kiwibob, Seattle


Attached Images
jpeg 4915.BRYCE.FIG.LEAVES.JPG (151.03 KB, 44 views)


Subject: Can Anyone Identify these two fig trees? Replies: 25
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 2,794
 
Nightspell,

Welcome to the Figs4Fun Forum.

Several references might help you, or they might confuse you:  "Fig Varieties: A Monograph" by Ira Condit (see my website for a downloadable PDF), Ray Givan's website where he shows Hugh Starnes' proposed Fig leaf classification system (circa 1905) which hasn't taken hold, and "FigLink1110" (downloadable as a PDF http://www.figs4fun.com/Links/FigLink1110.pdf ).

You will find that there has been much confusion about Variety names for hundreds of years.  I proposed using the internet to create a digital photo Fig Identification System but have had no takers!  When the dominant leaf form, a whole Fig, and a Fig sliced along the axis through the neck and eye are shown together, it could be the best ID system short of Genetic Fingerprinting which has severe limitations due to cost.  Your comment about why you called the first Fig "Brown Turkey" is indicative of why there is so much confusion!

Please note that the UC Davis collection which is the source for "FigLink1110" shows several synonyms for "Brown Turkey" which includes "California Brown Turkey" ("San Piero" according to Condit), and "Black Jack" which wasn't a named variety in 1955.  What that tells me when compared to Condit's Monograph and other information sources is that the UC Davis collection contains several mislabeled trees :( 

Visit my website:  http://sites.google.com/site/kiwifruitsalad2

Happy Growing,
kiwibob, Seattle

Subject: SLUGS! Replies: 39
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 2,955
 
Here in Slug country we call them "Mammoth Puget Sound Shelless Escargot" ;)  I save my hands from the slime by scraping them off whatever they are on using a plastic spoon, shake them off to the ground, then send them promptly to "Sole Heaven" with the help of the bottom of my shoe!

They are adept climbers that enjoy sliming up the acrylic walls of my Greenhouse to get to the benches the Fig cuttings are on.  I've seen them above shoulder level in fruit trees.  It's necessary to do nightly slug patrols until the trees are ready to plant.  Be sure to lift every pot, inspect the bottom & drainage holes to make sure they aren't hiding.

Happy Growing (and be sure to clean your shoes),
kiwibob,   Seattle

Visit my website:  http://sites.google.com/site/kiwifruitsalad2


Subject: Vashon and Madelainne des deux saisons brebas Replies: 8
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 1,198
 
Please identify which tree is which variety.  If you have the "Vashon" shown on the F4F variety page, it is likely the Caprifig "Gillette" (aka "Croisic").  When they leaf out fully, please post new photos showing the dominant leaf form.

Happy Growing,   kiwibob
Seattle

Visit my website:  http://sites.google.com/site/kiwifruitsalad2


Subject: History of "Vancouver" Fig Replies: 1
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 571
 
Does anybody know the history of the "Vancouver" Fig?  I got a cutting in 2007 from a friend who obtained it from UC Davis.  It's now less than chest high in a medium sized pot (about 10 gallon) with 4 slender branches and trying to set 13 Brebas!  Photos of mature "Vancouver" Brebas would be much appreciated.

Happy Growing,   kiwibob
Seattle

Visit my website:  http://sites.google.com/site/kiwifruitsalad2

Subject: Negronne?????????????? True or False Replies: 24
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 2,996
 
I have both "Negronne" from Northwoods/One Green World, and "Petit Negri" from a local collector.  They look similar in most respects except when sliced open, the meat color is always different.

See my website: http://sites.google.com/site/kiwifruitsalad2 for photos of Brebas from both taken in 2002 & 2004 respectively.  The "Negronne" leaf was the most advanced leaf form on the tree rather than the dominant leaf form.

Flavor and overall quality of "Petit Negri" is definitely inferior to "Negronne" in my collection.

Happy Growing,
kiwibob   Seattle


Subject: My best productive variants ... what's yours ? Replies: 9
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 1,393
 
See my website: http://sites.google.com/site/kiwifruitsalad2 to download a copy of Condit's "Fig Varieties: A Monograph" for what he says about Osborne Prolific!  That name should be dropped, and either Archipel or Rust used in its place.

kiwibob,   Seattle

Subject: Local Unknown ID Help Replies: 24
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 2,164
 
Ruben,

Try looking at Condit's "Fig Varieties: A Monograph" for his 1955 description, illustration, and some photos of "Brown Turkey".

It can be downloaded as a 3+mb PDF via my website:
http://sites.google.com/site/kiwifruitsalad2

Happy Growing,   kiwibob
Seattle



Subject: Grantham's Royal = Dauphine ?? Replies: 10
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 2,034
 
Try reading Condit's "Fig Varieties: A Monograph" (downloadable PDF from my website) and Malli's "FigLink 1110" (the genetic fingerprinting study of the UC Davis collection downloadable PDF somewhere on the Figs4Fun website).

Both show Dauphine and Drap d'Or (Royal Vineyard) as distinctly different San Pedro Varieties!  If Grantham's Royal is in fact Royal Vineyard, it is therefore NOT Dauphine.  Work by Malli this year may confirm this when released as several cultivars from collections in Washington State were "fingerprinted".

May Varietal Confusion be vanquished ;)
kiwibob,   Seattle

See my website:  http://sites.google.com/site/kiwifruitsalad2


Subject: Kiwibob's 2012 Fig Variety "wish list" Replies: 5
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 1,670
 
Final bump.

Subject: Kiwibob's 2012 Fig Variety "wish list" Replies: 5
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 1,670
 
Bump again.

Subject: Petite aubique vs negronne/vdb Replies: 4
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 1,627
 
My 2 cents worth:

I have "Negronne" from Northwoods/One Green World, and "Petit Negri" from a private collection (I don't know where it was obtained from).  Go to my website:  http://sites.google.com/site/kiwifruitsalad2/  and look at the page of Dark Colored Figs.

Both photos are of Breba crop Figs.  The "Negronne" leaf shown was the most advanced leaf form but they usually more closely resemble the "Petit Negri" leaf shown.  "Petit Negri" also routinely produces non-lobed leaves but "Negronne" rarely if ever does that.

Some say the two varieties are the same, but I disagree!  Look at the meat color of the two photos.  "Negronne" always has white meat heavily tinged with violet, and "Petit Negri" always has white meat lightly tinged with pink/red.  "Negronne" tastes OK but "Petit Negri" is always flavorless and mealy textured, so I regard them as two different but very similar varieties.  Just my opinion and only Genetic Fingerprinting will answer the question.

Happy Growing,   kiwibob,  Seattle

Subject: Kiwibob's 2012 Fig Variety "wish list" Replies: 5
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 1,670
 
Bump

Subject: Kiwibob's 2012 Fig Variety "wish list" Replies: 5
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 1,670
 
Fellow Fig Growers,

For 2012 I am looking to obtain 5-10 cuttings of each of the following Fig Varieties in the hope of rooting them to add to the Puget Sound Regional Fig Variety Test.  Please let me know via private message if you can provide cuttings by taking still dormant cuttings around April 1-15 and mailing them to me.

San Pedro type Figs:

+Castle Kennedy (Sp), 364

+Dauphine (Sp), 365, 418

Fracazzano Rosso (Sp), 367

Gentile (Sp); 360

Lampeira (Sp), 368

+Pied De Boeuf (Sp), 368

San Pedro (Sp), 363

Tiberio


Common type Figs:

Abakor (C), 381

BARBILLONE  (C), 415

Brown Turkey (C), 325, 428 = Eastern Brown Turkey

Cascitello, (C), 430

DOREE

Excel (C) (large fruit but light Breba crop)

FLANDERS

Gouraud Rouge (C), 440

+Grantham's Royal

Ischia Black (C), 443

Longue d’Août (C), 446

Marlow

+Mission = Franciscana, (C) 325, 437

Monaco (C), 397

Moscatel Preto (C), 452

Paradisio

San Piero (C), 467



+ = tried to root this year without success!

(C) or (Sp), 123 = Type & page number from Ira Condit's "Fig Varieties: A Monograph" available as a downloadable PDF from my website:

http://sites.google.com/site/kiwifruitsalad2

 

Some of my wish list are available locally as cuttings.  For the purpose of advancing the Puget Sound Regional Fig Variety Test, it would be much better to get 5-6 rooted plants of each for distribution next year, but only if from sources in Washington State to avoid importing possible soil pathogens.  Again, please reply to me via personal message if you can provide any of the above cuttings.

I have the following in my collection and would be willing to exchange cuttings:

Adriatic

Beall

"Vashon Violet" (Brunswick)

"Brown Turkey" (don't know if this is the real Eastern BT)

Bryce (variety unknown (too small for cuttings in 2012))

"California Brown Turkey" (1 cutting barely rooted this year, hope it's San Piero and not just another BT)

Chicago Hardy

"Dan's Favorite" (variety unknown)

Desert King

"Gene's Vashon" (variety unknown)

Gillette

Lattarula

Marlow (2 cuttings barely rooted this year)

"Marseilles" (from Burnt Ridge Nursery, incorrectly identified)

Monstrueuse (2 cuttings barely rooted this year)

Negronne

Neveralla (just barely rooting 1-2 cuttings this year)

Peter's Honey (I question if this is correctly identified, it doesn't match the Peter's Honey descriptions in nursery catalogs)

Petit Negri

Royal Vineyard (got 1 rooted cutting this year)

Tashkent (plant is too small for cuttings)

"Tilbury's Turkey" (variety unknown)

"Vancouver" (from UC Davis, variety unknown)

Violetta (patented, can't provide cuttings)

Happy Growing,   kiwibob
Seattle

Subject: Tilbury's Brown Turkey Replies: 5
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 834
 
Sara,

I named it after members of the Seattle Tree Fruit Society who gave me cuttings in 1995.  They obtained it long before from someone in Seattle and thought it was a Brown Turkey.  It doesn't match Condit's description of Brown Turkey, is slow growing, has dominantly 5-lobed leaves, and produces some Brebas that routinely tie in fourth place with the patented variety "Violetta" in local taste tests behind #1 "Vashon Violet" (Brunswick), #2 "Dan's Favorite" (unknown), and #3 "Gene's Vashon" (unknown).

Since we don't get the main crop to ripen here, I can't speak of what it will do in other areas of the country.  It isn't on my list of Figs to propagate because it doesn't produce enough Brebas to make it a worthwhile variety for growing in the Puget Sound Region.

Visit my website:  http://sites.google.com/site/kiwifruitsalad2

Hope this helps.

kiwibob
Seattle


Subject: Fig ID wanted Replies: 0
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 572
 
This is a Breba crop Fig picked Saturday from a tree near my house.  It was sold by a local Nursery as "Brown Turkey" but doesn't match Condit's description.  The tree produces few Brebas and has both 3 & 5-lobed leaves with 3-lobed being dominant.  As usual for Seattle, the main crop doesn't ripen so I can't show photos of that crop!

Happy Growing,
kiwibob   Seattle

Visit my website:  http://sites.google.com/site/kiwifruitsalad2

Attached Images
jpeg 71.ST.FIG.FINAL.JPG (507.45 KB, 43 views)


Subject: Gillette just Picked Replies: 13
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 1,863
 

Alan,

According to Condit's 1955 "Fig Varieties; A Monograph" (downloadable as a PDF from my website), "Gillette" is a synonym for "Croisic".  I don't understand why you insist on relating to Malta a Fig that originated in France!

Going by leaf shape alone is the wrong way to try identifying Figs.  It's necessary to look at dominant leaf shape, fruit exterior, and fruit interior as indicators of characteristics.  Since Figs vary from Breba crop to Main crop, you must also know which crop the specimen is from.  Even with all this information, Fig identification isn't an exact science.

Happy Growing,   kiwibob
Seattle


Subject: Gillette just Picked Replies: 13
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 1,863
 
I can't resist replying!  I got my Gillette in the early 1990's from the late John Parker who had grown it in Western Washington since purchasing it in the 1930's from a Portland Nursery that was being removed to make way for Highway 99.

Sorry but I don't know that I've ever met either Gorgi or Alan and don't recall sending cuttings of Gillette to anyone.

The tree near the Vashon Ferry Terminal has leaves that resemble my Gillette and leaves that don't.  I haven't been on the Island when that tree had ripe Figs to compare the interior with mine, but Vashon has many Fig trees and many of them are Gillette that match mine.

Happy Growing,   kiwibob
Seattle


Subject: bunch of brebas Replies: 14
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 895
 
Barry,

Try slicing one each of the Petit Negra (Petit Negri?) & VDB lengthwise and photograph them.  You may find there are internal color differences as well as the leaf differences.  One NAFEX member asserts they are the same variety but I disagree!

kiwibob
Seattle

See my website:   http://sites.google.com/site/kiwifruitsalad2


Subject: Cuttings wanted of Ischia Black, Lampeira, & Longue d’Août Replies: 5
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 913
 
Bump again!  Does anyone have these three in their personal collection with enough material to sell me cuttings?

Thanks in advance,   kiwibob

Subject: Cuttings wanted of Ischia Black, Lampeira, & Longue d’Août Replies: 5
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 913
 
Bump.

kiwibob,   Seattle


Subject: Cuttings wanted of Ischia Black, Lampeira, & Longue d’Août Replies: 5
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 913
 
I'm still looking!

kiwibob,   Seattle




Subject: Cuttings wanted of Ischia Black, Lampeira, & Longue d’Août Replies: 5
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 913
 
I'm looking for about 5 cuttings each of the following to add to The Puget Sound Regional Fig Variety Test:
Ischia Black (C), p.443
Lampeira (Sp), p.368
Longue d’Août (C), p.446

I'm only interested in cuttings that are of these varieties as Condit described them on the respective page numbers in "Fig Varieties; A Monograph".  If you have them and know the verifiable source you got the cuttings from, please send me a private message and let me know the cost of obtaining the cuttings.

A PDF version of Condit's Monograph can be downloaded from my website:
http://sites.google.com/site/kiwifruitsalad2

Happy Growing,   kiwibob,   Seattle



Subject: Zidi Fig Replies: 49
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 6,676
 
In "Fig Varieties: A Monograph" Condit lists Zidi as a Smyrna type Fig.

You can download a PDF of Condit's Monograph from either of my websites:
http://sites.google.com/site/kiwifruitsalad2
or
http://kiwifruitsalsa.wordpress.com


Subject: Figs varieties for very cool climate Replies: 17
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 5,754
 
Yves,

No, I haven't been able to determine the true variety name for "Dan's Favorite" but hope to eventually find out.

Burnt Ridge Nursery is starting to propagate "Olympian" but it hasn't undergone any trials yet.  I hope to obtain starts to add to the Puget Sound Regional Fig Variety Test in the next year.  Denny told me in August that it looks very much like "Gene's Vashon" but the only way we'll find out is to have "Gene's Vashon" genetically fingerprinted for comparison.

Sorry, I don't send any Figs out of the country.

kiwibob
Seattle


Subject: Figs varieties for very cool climate Replies: 17
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 5,754
 
Yves,

Michael's article was one of the best I've seen for cool maritime climates.  Concentrate on the San Pedro types and on those Common types that are known to produce good Breba crops as you likely won't get the Main crop to ripen on most varieties!

Check my website:  http://sites.google.com/site/kiwifruitsalad2
to see what I'm doing in a similar microclimate.  Also download the PDF of Ira Condit's "Fig Varieties: A Monograph" from my website and check the Common types to see which do good Breba crops.

Happy Growing,   kiwibob,   Seattle



Subject: Request for Cuttings for Non-Profit Replies: 6
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 732
 
Matt,

I have two pages of 2003 hand-written notes from the late Bill Fogarty (Fig expert of Corvallis, Oregon) that I would be happy to e-mail you if you send me your e-mail address.  The Portland and Eugene microclimates allow most varieties to ripen both crops, so you should have many options that we don't!

Check my website:  http://sites.google.com/site/kiwifruitsalad2
to see what I'm doing up north of you.

Happy Growing,   kiwibob,   Seattle


Subject: Negronne Replies: 2
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 1,313
 
A photo of Negronne aka Violette de Bordeaux can also be found on my website.  That photo is of a Breba crop Negronne with a very advanced form of the leaf.  A more common form of the Negronne leaf looks similar to the leaf of Petit Negri.  Some folks claim the two varieties are the same, but in my collection they are distinctly different in growth habit and clearly different in the meat color.

For reference, look at "Fig Varieties: A Monograph", downloadable as a PDF from my website:   http://sites.google.com/site/kiwifruitsalad2

Happy Growing,   kiwibob,   Seattle

Subject: Melanzana MS = Longue D'Aout Replies: 10
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 3,367
 
The comparison looks pretty convincing, but Condit might disagree!  See pages 446 & 451 of "Fig Varieties: A Monograph", downloadable as a PDF from my website:   http://sites.google.com/site/kiwifruitsalad2
Also possible that Melanzana MS isn't the Melanzana described by Condit.

Happy Growing,   kiwibob,   Seattle


Subject: Is "White Adriatic" the same as "Adriatic" ? Replies: 2
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 749
 
Ottawan,

According to Condit in "Fig Varieties: A Monograph" (downloadable as a PDF from my website:  http://sites.google.com/site/kiwifruitsalad2 ) page 406 the answer is...  Just download it!  It is such a valuable reference, everybody on this Forum should have a copy.

kiwibob
Seattle

Subject: Fig in a fur coat! Replies: 1
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 691
 
We've had not the best Fig growing weather this year.  Here is a pic of one "Desert King" Breba that was subject first to critter predation, then the effects of a damp, gray Seattle Summer.

Enjoy ;)
kiwibob
Seattle

Visit my website:  http://sites.google.com/site/kiwifruitsalad2

Attached Images
jpeg IMG_0974.FUZZY.DK.JPG (104.00 KB, 47 views)


Subject: Is this English Brown Turkey??? Replies: 14
Posted By: kiwibob Views: 1,813
 
One of my favorite Fig issues, "Brown Turkey"!

Here's what Condit gives as a description in "Fig Varieties: A Monograph" (downloadable as a PDF of about 3mb from my website: http://sites.google.com/site/kiwifruitsalad2 )
 

    Descriptions of fruit by Eisen and some other authors are not clear, as they are probably confused with similar varieties.  Confusion also exists in some descriptions, as indicated by the two synonyms, Large Blue and Small Blue, with reference to size of fruit.  The following description is from specimens grown at Riverside and Fresno, and as compiled from various English accounts.

    Leaves small, mostly 3-lobed; upper surface dull; upper sinuses shallow and narrow; base subcordate; margins crenate.


 

430                                                                                Hilgardia                                                          [Vol. 23, No. 11

 

    Brebas few, medium, oblique-pyriform, with thick neck that is often curved; stalk up to 1/2 inch long, sometimes swollen toward the body of the fruit; ribs prominent, producing a somewhat corrugated surface; eye medium, open, scales violet-brown; color mahogany brown, tinged with violet; meat white, with violet tinge; pulp strawberry; flavor fairly rich; quality fair.  (Plate 21, D.)

    Second-crop figs medium or below, turbinate or oblate, mostly without neck; average weight 28 grams; stalk up to 5/8 inch long, often thick and swollen at the apex; ribs present, fairly prominent, more deeply colored than body; eye medium, open, with violet-brown scales; white flecks large, conspicuous, scattered; color auburn to burnt umber; pulp amber to light strawberry, practically seedless; flavor sweet, but not rich; quality fair.  (Plate 15,E.)

    Caprified figs violet-brown, bloom prominent; average weight 36 grams pulp strawberry; quality only fair.  Second crop matures over a long season.

                  Rogers (1834) stated that if Lee’s Perpetual—bearing fig is “cultivated as it should be—that is, in pots, under glass—it yields fruit nearly all the year round.”


Given Condit's description of "Leaves small, mostly 3-lobed;" I can honestly say that I have never seen a verifiable "Brown Turkey" tree here in the Puget Sound Region nor a single locally grown ripe "Brown Turkey" Fig grown here in my 19 years of Fig growing. It is likely the variety with the greatest amount of name confusion of any Fig.

Even the USDA/UC Davis genetic fingerprinting has shed no light on what the true "Brown Turkey" is, having stated that "Black Jack" & "California Brown Turkey" are synonyms. Problem is that "California Brown Turkey" is properly known as "San Piero" which is distinctly different from "Brown Turkey"! Perhaps one day this confusion might have some light shed on it, but right now it appears to me that the USDA/UC Davis collection has some mislabeled plants in it that were used in the genetic fingerprinting.

Nelson, I look forward to seeing photos including the interior of the fruit when your Figs from these trees ripen.

kiwibob
Seattle

 

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