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Subject: OT: Snaky fig checker Replies: 27
Posted By: TucsonKen Views: 432
 
Vic--rather than post more shots here, I'll send you a PM.

Subject: OT: Snaky fig checker Replies: 27
Posted By: TucsonKen Views: 432
 
Yes, I love having kingsnakes in the yard, but would prefer not having rattlesnakes right in the neighborhood. My wife stepped on one last year and fortunately wasn't bitten. I've saved a couple rattlesnakes trapped in chicken wire (one at my house, and one at a friend's) when the sun hadn't gotten to them yet, but I don't recommend it for anyone not experienced in handling them safely. In both cases, head movement was severely restricted by the wire, so I could safely cut out the whole section without risk of getting bitten. Once the snake & wire section was free of the fence, I used one hand to immobilize the head & neck with a close-fitting plastic tube, and snipped the wire away with the other.  09 not an ad for Nocona boots.jpg 

Subject: OT: Snaky fig checker Replies: 27
Posted By: TucsonKen Views: 432
 
Vic--the most common snake around my fruit trees & yard is the California kingsnake (5 so far this year), with the western diamondback in second place--two this year, one of which got stuck in a wire fence and died before I could rescue it. (Now though, looking at the rattlesnake photo again, it looks more like a Mojave than a western diamondback.)rdc 2017-05-20 Lgc_6053.jpg  2017-03-21 rattlesnake trapped in wire.jpg 

Subject: Easy beetle trap Replies: 12
Posted By: TucsonKen Views: 3,550
 
Crademan--thanks for the heads-up about trapping dried-fruit beetles. Strangely, I haven't even seen one this year, but if the show up again maybe I'll try a trap targeted specifically at them.

Cjccmc--I wonder if, from the beetles' perspective, your soaked paper towel approach might have been "too much of a good thing?" It could be that a steady, but slight whiff of alcohol would be more effective than a big cloud of it? Hard to say. I've also found that different configurations of traps produce different results in my yard--but they all catch something.

Subject: Easy beetle trap Replies: 12
Posted By: TucsonKen Views: 3,550
 
When he was still at home, my son used the racquet technique to good effect, but I'll stick with traps & jars.

I'm puzzled a to why you're not having any luck with an alcohol bait--are you using too much? I find that a short wick of about 3/16" diameter through the same-sized hole in the lid of a pill bottle works great. They like it so much, they'll even eat the rolled-up paper towel wick down to a nub if they have access to it. I put my traps about 5 feet off the ground, right next to a tree where they like to hang out, and I'll often get 2-3 inches of beetles per trap in a day. But--I've also noticed that they're also attracted to their own foul smell, and after a bunch of beetles have wallowed around in their own excrement in the trap for a while, then even more are anxious to get in. You might try catching several in a jar and "priming" your trap with them, to see if that helps to get things going.

Subject: Easy beetle trap Replies: 12
Posted By: TucsonKen Views: 3,550
 
You're welcome. Unfortunately, even with three traps going constantly and frequent forays into the fig forest to catch them in a big jar, killing thousands per day, it hasn't made much of a dent in the beetle population this year. They're everywhere, and have destroyed most of the figs. rdc 2017-07-30 beetles_6618.jpg 

Attached Images
jpeg rdc 2017-07-27 beetle approaching trap_6596.jpg (66.74 KB, 33 views)


Subject: Pawpaw Replies: 115
Posted By: TucsonKen Views: 10,848
 
Unfortunately, this update is sooner than planned, and not for the purpose I wanted. I guess my pawpaw trees are still too young because all six of the nascent fruit clusters shriveled up and are falling off. Oh well! Hopefully they'll put on some good growth this year, and I'll keep my fingers crossed for next spring!

Subject: Pawpaw Replies: 115
Posted By: TucsonKen Views: 10,848
 
Thanks, BBB--your mention of Lehman's chiffon made me curious, so I googled it and eventually ended up on England's Orchard site, which reminded me that they sell seed from Peterson varieties as well as from many others. My initial impulse is to order a bunch of seed, but I'd best restrain myself, since my yard is clearly not on the same scale as those of recent posters on this thread!

I'm glad my pawpaws-in-the-desert experiment is still of interest to some on f4f, because I like to report back on the same threads over the years, just to preserve the backstory and keep some continuity. I'll chime in again when something interesting happens--hopefully with some shots of ripe fruit, whether this year or next.

Subject: Pawpaw Replies: 115
Posted By: TucsonKen Views: 10,848
 
Dennis, that's amazing! Once you've tried a good representation of fruits from your piece of Eden, I'd love to know which pawpaws are your favorites! I can't imagine wanting to leave all that in five years, unless you're just so worn out from taking care of it that you've lost your appetite for fruit!

Subject: Pawpaw Replies: 115
Posted By: TucsonKen Views: 10,848
 
Okay, Bass--thanks. For now, at least, I'm going to stick with planting seeds in the ground so the long taproot can develop, as I think that is an advantage in my desert climate.

Subject: Pawpaw Replies: 115
Posted By: TucsonKen Views: 10,848
 
Dennis, hopefully out of 40 trees you'll get something, even with all the rain--if they don't float away! Please keep us posted.

Vladis, that's a beautiful flower! None of mine were particularly pretty.

Bass, I've heard the Shenandoah is particularly good and thought about getting one, but then decided to pass on the patented pawpaws because for me, propagation is half the fun. Do you sell seeds from any of the best varieties?

Thanks, Mulhero--I'm pretty optimistic. So far, six out of the twelve flowers have set fruit, but I expect they'll start dropping before long. Hopefully I'll get to taste at least one fruit from each tree, though!

Subject: Pawpaw Replies: 115
Posted By: TucsonKen Views: 10,848
 
I thought I'd revive this old thread to give an update on how my pawpaws are doing in Tucson. I planted several pre-germinated seeds directly in the ground in 2012. Some died, but I still have six trees--two are very small, two are a couple of feet tall, and two are between 5 and 6 feet. Both larger trees bloomed this year (about six flowers each), and after being naturally pollinated by flies, are starting to set a few fruit. I don't know if the fruit will be able to fully mature on such small trees, but it's an encouraging start!

start! rdc 2017-04-20 pawpaw flower & fly_5639.jpg  rdc 2017-04-20 pawpaw seedling_5636.jpg  rdc crp 2017-04-20 pawpaw fruit set_5625.jpg


Subject: My experience and success with rooting in Coir Replies: 21
Posted By: TucsonKen Views: 736
 
FigColt, I don't know whether your speculation about horizontal vs vertical is correct, but it seems reasonable to me. I just started some cuttings in vertical pots made from 2-liter soda bottles; maybe I'll block the coir so it doesn't fall out, and try laying the pots on their sides, just to see what happens. Can't hurt!

Subject: My experience and success with rooting in Coir Replies: 21
Posted By: TucsonKen Views: 736
 
Good info--thanks very much for writing it up and sharing. I think it's also important to use the coarse material rather than the fine stuff, because it gives good air circulation. Maybe some people's past failures were due to using fine-ground coir.

Subject: OT Capulin Cherry Replies: 6
Posted By: TucsonKen Views: 124
 
Ouch!

What was your original source--Trade Winds seeds or other seedlings, rooted cuttings or grafted? Any named cultivars? Were there any major taste differences among your trees?

Subject: OT Capulin Cherry Replies: 6
Posted By: TucsonKen Views: 124
 
Thanks for the lead.  The fruit looks good--too bad you chopped your trees down! Did you just not like the taste?

Subject: OT Capulin Cherry Replies: 6
Posted By: TucsonKen Views: 124
 
I am looking for Capulin Cherry (Prunus salicifolia) cuttings or seeds. Can anyone recommend a source?

Subject: OT - Look what Santa brought me! Replies: 14
Posted By: TucsonKen Views: 320
 
Nice! One of those would come in very handy at my place.

Subject: Sour beetles Replies: 7
Posted By: TucsonKen Views: 1,136
 
Hi Gene--I thought I'd revive this old thread to ask what results you've had battling beetles in the years since you first posted this. Is your chemical cocktail still working? Any negative effects?

Subject: Problems Posting Images? Storage Limit Exceeded? More Than 1MB? Replies: 53
Posted By: TucsonKen Views: 872
 
Thanks TorontoJoe! Your tutorial worked perfectly and I am once again able to post photos.

Subject: OT Avocados for desert Replies: 28
Posted By: TucsonKen Views: 759
 
Thanks, All, for your interest, comments & questions. And, thanks to TorontoJoe for instructions about posting photos even after reaching F4F's limit.

[2016_11_23_Wilma_guacamole_rdc] 
Here's a batch of Wilma guacamole I made for our Thanksgiving house guests, roughly following this recipe: http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/alton-brown/guacamole-recipe.html. It disappeared in a hurry! I also learned that on older fruit, where the skin has dried out and gotten somewhat wrinkly and tough, it was much easier to peel away from the flesh--which is why this batch doesn't show as many black bits as in the earlier shot.

Subject: OT Avocados for desert Replies: 28
Posted By: TucsonKen Views: 759
 
As is often the case with trying to get plants to grow in challenging climates, there are lots of exceptions, but it's a good idea to protect young avocados from extremes of sun, heat, and cold. I put a shade cloth over mine the first year when it started getting hot, and I covered them with a sheet during freezes during their first winter. It's better to err on the side of caution. Different varieties may need customized treatment--the in-ground Wilma wasn't fazed by hot weather this summer, but a 2-gallon plant grafted from the same tree really suffered, and had to be moved under the eaves. Leaves on the small Opal next to the big Wilma start shriveling when it gets really hot, so it needs temporary shade--but I'm hoping that will change as it gets bigger.

Subject: OT Avocados for desert Replies: 28
Posted By: TucsonKen Views: 759
 
Good luck, Mark--and if you need to try again, let me know.

Here's a paper http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/fruit-nut/files/2015/04/avocados_2015.pdf from Texas A&M that might be useful to anyone growing avocados in marginal areas.

This one http://30r8p93i26e4rjv9qo3ulokei.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/Avocados-For-SA1.pdf gives more information on planting so the union will eventually be below soil level.

Subject: OT Avocados for desert Replies: 28
Posted By: TucsonKen Views: 759
 
Sas, I water them quite a bit, and at this point I'm sure they could get by on less. They're on a drip cycle that comes on every day, and in addition, I've run one of the down-spouts from the roof's rain gutter into the surrounding berm, so they get heavily watered whenever it rains. However, the soil in this part of my yard is sandy and drains rapidly. They are also mulched with several inches of leaves and wood chips.

Subject: OT Avocados for desert Replies: 28
Posted By: TucsonKen Views: 759
 
Mark (starch)--I'm glad to hear it survived the Phoenix inferno! As mild as your winters are, it should push new growth almost continually and become well established by the time the heat returns. I'll be very interested to hear how it does next summer with roots in the ground. It would probably be wise to shade it during the next hot season. Pardon my poor memory, but did you get it as an already-grafted plant, or a scion that you grafted yourself? What rootstock is it on?

I had been confused about reports that Brazos Belle is a genetic clone of Wilma, so I phoned Bill Schneider (who holds the trademark on 'Wilma') about ten days ago to see what he could tell me. He had no information about Brazos Belle, and could not tell me anything about its origins or relationship, if any, to Wilma. However, I learned that Schneider's trademark protects the specific product that he sells, and that he is the only one authorized to sell it under the Wilma name. As I understand it now, Wilma avocados are only those which he produces, which are on a particular rootstock and grafted in a specific way (with the graft union very close to the roots themselves), which allows the union to be buried a couple of inches or so below ground level. This way, the superior cold-hardiness of the above-ground portion is not compromised by exposure of a frost-tender trunk. His rootstock also has other advantages, such as tolerance of alkaline soil.

Schneider's reason for trademarking the Wilma name (along with others that he sells) is that if someone else were to graft scions from his trees in the more traditional way, say several inches higher on the rootstock, or onto less cold-hardy or otherwise inferior rootstocks, and sell them under his trademarked names, they could not be expected to perform as well as his trees, and might well damage the reputation of his particular product.

I was worried that I might have impinged on his trademark by sharing grafted plants and cuttings from my Wilma tree (which was purchased at his nursery), but he said anyone can propagate it any way they see fit, and even sell it, but they can't call it Wilma--they have to come up with their own name. So, if I understand it correctly, a trademarked plant is less restrictive than a patented plant (such as Peterson Pawpaw cultivars, which are illegal for anyone but Peterson or his authorized agents to propagate), but only the owner of the trademarked name can legally apply that name to plants propagated from the named variety.

Subject: OT Avocados for desert Replies: 28
Posted By: TucsonKen Views: 759
 
Thanks--and great avatar, btw! I've read about avocados bearing fruit in containers and have seen a few photos, but don't have any personal experience. Here's a short article about it: http://homeguides.sfgate.com/avocado-trees-container-37257.html.

Subject: OT Avocados for desert Replies: 28
Posted By: TucsonKen Views: 759
 
Sorry--for some reason, the photo won't post.


[I just saw TorontoJoe's very useful post about working around the photo-posting problem. I followed his instructions, and edited the previous post to add the photo--it worked like a charm. Thanks, TorontoJoe!!]

Subject: OT Avocados for desert Replies: 28
Posted By: TucsonKen Views: 759
 
UPDATE:

The Wilma avocado tree produced a lot more fruit this year, so I thought I'd share some info.
[2016_11_18_Wilma_fruit_7956_rdc] 

The quality is very good, and friends/family who have tasted the fruit have been pleased with it. In general, the longer it hangs on the tree, the better it gets--unless the skin has been damaged, which causes the flesh to dry out.

Cold damage has been minimal since I planted it, but we've had fairly mild winters.

The tree is a very fast grower, and needs more room than I've given it. 

Negative points:

It's only available from Devine Avocados in Devine, Texas, and they don't ship out of state.

The thin, edible skin is easily damaged by wind, birds, and rats.

Because the skin is so thin and delicate (similar to a tomato's), the harvested fruit can become somewhat dried-out if it's picked too early.

The thin skin is impossible to peel without wasting a lot of flesh, so it's best to eat the peel, which tastes fine, but makes for odd-looking guacamole.

There is typically a round, thin spot (visible on lower-right fruit in photo) at the base of each avocado where the flesh is gray and hard; I trim this away.

The papery seed coat doesn't stick to the seed, so it must be picked off the flesh--easy to do with a pair of tweezers, but still an extra step.


I'm looking forward to comparing Wilma to other varieties, and have Aravaipa, Mexicola Grande, and Wurtz (aka Little Cado) in pots ready to plant in the spring. My Opal produced its first fruit this year, which was pretty good but harvested too early--so I'll know more about it next year.



Subject: a list of closed eye varieties Replies: 36
Posted By: TucsonKen Views: 10,413
 
jdsfrance--thanks for the tip!

Subject: a list of closed eye varieties Replies: 36
Posted By: TucsonKen Views: 10,413
 
It's good to see this old thread. Now that several years have passed, I need to modify my previous comments with regard to insect-caused souring in my yard:

Black Madeira (from UCD 2010; heavy FMV. In ground); prone to souring.

Black Mission (from local nursery. In ground); good growth, excellent, no souring.

Black Mission NL (from Encanto 2010); superb quality, no souring, but tree died due to root problems. Saved air layer in time to try again.

Conadria (DFIC0005 from UCD 2010. In ground); prone to souring.

Desert King (FJ, 2014); good, no souring--too early for beetles.

Excel (DIFIC0020 from UCD 2010; In ground); prone to souring.

Hardy Chicago (from Cathy 2012); prone to souring.

Ischia Green (DIFIC0052 from UCD 2010. In ground); prone to souring.

LSU Gold (from Cathy 2012); prone to souring.

LSU Improved Celeste (bare-root from JD 2012); prone to souring.

LSU Purple (sucker from GF 2011. In ground); prone to souring until late in season when few figs are left, but insect activity has declined.

Marseilles VS (from vicki; originally from Encanto); prone to souring.

Panachee (from Mike G 2014); still small, but few mature fruit last year were sour.

Tena (DIFIC0021 from UCD 2010; prolific, sweet, prone to souring, ant damage and splitting—likely discard)

Unknown Georgia White Hybrid (from GF 2011) Outstanding, but prone to souring.

Violette de Bordeaux (DIFIC0063 from UCD 2010); extremely prone to souring--100% loss.


At this point, my only completely reliable varieties are Black Mission and Desert King, although I'm still trying a few other varieties that aren't mature enough yet to be certain how they'll perform.


Subject: Best figs at your location Replies: 308
Posted By: TucsonKen Views: 76,644
 
I have a big problem with figs souring. Out of approximately two dozen varieties I've fruited, only black mission has consistently produced high quality figs on a healthy tree, without any souring.

Subject: OT - Hachiya Persimmon picking time Replies: 15
Posted By: TucsonKen Views: 335
 
Nice photos everybody! Persimmons, especially Hachiya, are high on my list of favorite fruits--fresh or dried. Unfortunately, I had very little production on my trees this year (Hachiya with 3 other varieties top-worked onto it, a young Saijo with Ormond grafted on a couple of low branches, and Fuyu)--very few fruit, and most of it smaller than normal. Here's hoping for better crops in 2017!

Subject: Snake in Fig Tree Replies: 40
Posted By: TucsonKen Views: 839
 
Well, from my personal perspective it at least sounds like a pretty major overkill, but to each his own. I'm coming at it from the standpoint of having studied and worked with snakes for many years--in a venom research lab, as a reptile keeper at a zoo, and in the field. I've been bitten by many, many non-venomous snakes, which typically cause less damage than I get picking blackberries, and I'm willing to put up with a few scratches. But--I understand that many people don't share my affinity, and I don't expect to change their minds. When I find rattlesnakes in my yard I relocate them, but I don't recommend that approach to anyone lacking the proper experience or equipment. When I find nonvenomous snakes in my yard, I'm very pleased, because I like them and understand that they pose no threat worth even considering.

Subject: Snake in Fig Tree Replies: 40
Posted By: TucsonKen Views: 839
 
Agreed, Johnny D--it's pretty sad, but much easier to hate and fear something than to understand it.

Subject: Not for the Faint of Heart Replies: 21
Posted By: TucsonKen Views: 298
 
I posted last year about an easy-to-make trap for dealing with these beetles, using rubbing alcohol as bait: https://figs4funforum.websitetoolbox.com/post/easy-beetle-trap-7542388

I have since refined the design a bit and made it more effective. With two traps I caught hundreds of beetles last year. Unfortunately, since they are such strong fliers and can detect the smell of fruit from long distances, they come from all over and my traps didn't make much of a dent in their numbers. They still destroyed most of the fruit, and what they missed was ruined by dried fruit beetles or birds. This year I haven't even tried to protect the figs--birds and bugs are getting it all.

Subject: Huge Ripe Improved a Brown Turkey Replies: 7
Posted By: TucsonKen Views: 446
 
Nice, Dennis.

Subject: Animal control , lo cost Replies: 6
Posted By: TucsonKen Views: 335
 
I often see birds land right in the trees while I'm picking fruit. It usually doesn't take long for them to get used to something, and ignore it. Maybe the air man approach will deter some, though. Good luck! Please let us know how it works out over the long haul.

I built a large enclosure over many of my trees (I made posts about it several years ago) and it worked great once I got small enough bird netting. However, it only lasted a little more than a season before UV and wind shredded the mesh. My trees are currently unprotected, and the birds/beetles get pretty much everything--I'm watering them to keep them alive in hopes of a future solution. I think the only permanent answer to the non-insect pests is a metal mesh enclosure with a maximum opening size of 1/2"--but that's probably more expensive than I'm up for at the moment. Maybe one of these days.

Subject: 2016 Backyard Fruit Tree Project - Episode #4 Desert King Fig Tree Breba Crop Replies: 22
Posted By: TucsonKen Views: 399
 
Joe, thanks for the video. Your trees are looking great! They've really grown since I saw them. My little Desert King will produce its first very small crop this year. Looking forward to tasting it!

Subject: OT paw paw tree and fruit Replies: 25
Posted By: TucsonKen Views: 1,122
 
The largest (57") of my paw paw seedlings, all planted 2012 in-ground as pre-germinated seeds, has its first flower. It's the only one on the tree so I don't expect it to fruit this year, but I'm encouraged. Maybe in another year or two!
2016-05-09 paw paw seedling--1st flower.jpg


Subject: OT - Very painful injury Replies: 77
Posted By: TucsonKen Views: 868
 
Wow, Dennis! I guess you're lucky it wasn't worse, but that's small consolation considering how bad it was. Hope you heal quickly. Maybe it's time you thought about moving to Tucson--very little ice, and all we shovel in the winter is sunshine.

Subject: Cactus pears Replies: 108
Posted By: TucsonKen Views: 8,116
 
I've never watched this process so I can't say first-hand, but someone in the education department where I worked several years ago told me they separated large quantities of juice from the pulp by freezing the fruit and then piling it in a colander lined with paper towels, over a bowl, to thaw. I don't know whether they sliced the fruit before freezing it, but I think that would help. As it was explained to me, freezing ruptures the cell walls, and as the fruit thaws, the juice runs out and leaves the spines/glochids behind, trapped by the paper towels.

Subject: OT - Got Fuyu Persimmons? Replies: 63
Posted By: TucsonKen Views: 687
 
If you can keep the birds away, it's probably best to let the astringent varieties, like Hachiya, ripen/soften on the tree, or get really close--but I pick a lot of them hard and let them soften indoors, and they're still very good. Fuyus and other non-astringent types are good hard or soft.

Subject: OT - Got Fuyu Persimmons? Replies: 63
Posted By: TucsonKen Views: 687
 
I dry both Fuyu and Hachiya. Both are good dried, but the Hachiya are literally like candy. I prefer to wait until they are gooshy ripe, then cut them in half lengthwise, scoop them out of the skin with a spoon, and then slice each half once more to make thinner pieces for more even drying. They're sugary-sticky, so a light shot of PAM on the dehydrator tray will make them easier to peel off when dry.

Subject: New to Forum, growing Figs in Phoenix Replies: 25
Posted By: TucsonKen Views: 637
 
Hey Jeannine--Good to have another Arizonan on the forum. I was at the AZRFG meeting also (with a bucket of blackberry cuttings), but am not a member.

Subject: My Persimmons tree Replies: 47
Posted By: TucsonKen Views: 572
 
A couple of generous forum members gave me the opportunity to do some persimmon grafting. One shared scions from his various cultivars, and the other sent a dozen or so seedlings (for rootstocks) left over from his large-scale grafting project. Since the scions arrived before the rootstocks were ready for grafting, I top-worked the scions onto my mature Hachiya, simply as a place to store them. The following year, when the seedlings were ideal for grafting, I clipped new scions from the established grafts, and grafted several new trees for myself, friends and family. Most of the original grafts are still on the Hachiya and doing fine, although one variety (Eureka) didn't survive its second year. I did graft several of one type onto the tree, just as insurance.

Here's a post from back when I was first starting to graft, describing the steps I used:

http://figs4funforum.websitetoolbox.com/post/simple-stepbystep-grafting-5830743?

I am sure there are other methods that will work, but I found this approach to be quite reliable and easy. Here are the original instructions I learned from--they are better than the description I posted, and far more detailed. However, to see the photos you'll need to register with the Citrus Growers Forum:

http://citrus.forumup.org/about500-citrus.html

Subject: My Persimmons tree Replies: 47
Posted By: TucsonKen Views: 572
 
I've grafted a few other varieties onto my Hachiya. It's pretty easy, and might be a work-around solution for a tree that isn't producing. At any rate, it's fun to see the different types, and compare them. For example, these are Saijo (first season producing--I hope they're bigger next year). Saijo, Tamopan, and Matsumoto are all grafted onto the upper branches of my Hachiya, and are producing.
2015-10-05 saijo rdc.jpg 


Subject: My Persimmons tree Replies: 47
Posted By: TucsonKen Views: 572
 
I don't believe cuttings will root. I tried to air layer one once, and it didn't work. Your best bet is to buy one from a nursery, or get a seedling and graft your own. There are lots of people willing to share scions but first you need a rootstock.

Subject: My Persimmons tree Replies: 47
Posted By: TucsonKen Views: 572
 
Thanks for sharing the photos, everybody! Persimmons (especially the astringent types) are very high on my list of favorite fruits. Peter C, if you don't have a bird problem, you might try leaving your Hachiyas on the tree until they begin to soften. They tend to ripen quite well even when picked rock-hard and left to soften on the counter, but to me they develop a sweeter, better flavor if left on the tree until they start to soften--or at least till they turn bright red-orange.

Subject: OT Avocados for desert Replies: 28
Posted By: TucsonKen Views: 759
 
I tasted the first ripe Wilma this morning, so here's the report. Since the ones I picked earlier had started shriveling on the counter while I waited for them to ripen, I put this one in a Tupperware with a slightly moistened paper towel. I think it was still a bit too early because it took a week or more to soften, and this morning when I checked it there was a dark moldy spot, which I trimmed off. I thought the flavor was good, but it wasn't the best avocado I've ever eaten. The texture was a little denser and stickier than what I buy in the grocery store, but that could be a result of being picked a little too soon.

I had worried about the loose seed, since some say that indicates a bad avocado, but then I read that the Mexican varieties often have a loose seed and it's not a problem. The thin seed coat sticks to the fruit but lifts off easily--however, I'd prefer not to have to fuss with picking off the pieces. I also wondered whether the black, edible skin would be bothersome, but it's fine--much like a tomato skin, I didn't notice it in my mouth. I mashed some of it up with a fork to see how it would look as guacamole, and the bits of skin didn't bother me.

I'm interested to see how the rest of the crop ripens--a recent storm thrashed them around and damaged the skin on most of them.

2015-10-21 Wilma fruit rdc.jpg 
2015-10-21 Wilma fruit smashed rdc.jpg 


Subject: Easy frost protection for warm climate Replies: 6
Posted By: TucsonKen Views: 147
 
Smyfigs, unfortunately I'm no authority on avocados, but if you've still got green leaves or branches I'd guess your chances for recovery are good. You might want to rig some temporary shade, and if the foliage is still wilting maybe do some pruning to try to balance the amount of moisture being lost through the leaves with the amount being taken up by the remaining roots. With a young avocado graft I sometimes keep it tented in a plastic bag to keep the humidity high until the vascular connection between the rootstock and scion is strong enough to keep the leaves supplied with enough water--maybe you could make some kind of tent around your tree if it seems necessary, but take care not to cook it in direct sunshine. Good luck!

Starch--I sent you a PM.

 

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