Register  |   | 
 
 
 


The search returned 149 posts

Only find topics started by nas33
   
Topics  |  Posts
Subject: First try with scions - mold? Replies: 13
Posted By: nas33 Views: 1,393
 
you cant go wrong with spaghnum moss.  Almost impossible for mold to survive.

A handful, soaked in water for 30 seconds and squeezed out fairly hard will do for a large Ziploc bag.  You can usually root up to 3 normal sized cuttings per bag.

Seal up the bag half way, and put it in an average temp place that has light but direct light is not necessary. 
Once the rootlets appear (and they will), cup/pot them up in the media of your choice but make sure its an opaque container or a clear cup sleeved with an opaque one.  Again wet the media once until water comes out the bottom and then leave it alone.  You probably should throw another cup on top with a couple holes in it to keep moisture/humidity around the cutting top.
This method give you so much leeway with moisture and mold that I will never go back to other methods.  I have nearly 100% success with this method and I failed miserably with ALL the other methods I have tried.

good luck


Subject: Natalina - Grimo Replies: 6
Posted By: nas33 Views: 1,267
 
Here you go...

Attached Images
jpeg IMG_0692.JPG (611.58 KB, 138 views)


Subject: Large Greek Black Replies: 9
Posted By: nas33 Views: 1,210
 
Mine was in its pot for the first full year and it surprised me as well with a ripe fig.  Very tasty.  Good grower, looks prolific.




Subject: Same tree with Fruit size varying in size at different heights!!! Replies: 8
Posted By: nas33 Views: 732
 
I read in 3 different horticultural books that equalization of the sap is crucial in fruit trees, especially with figs.

I suspect the shorter branches have stronger and more consistent sap availability hence the larger and probably better quality figs on the shorter branches.

One thing I have noticed though with short branches closest to the ground is that the figs one those branches ripen earlier if they are on my driveway.  I attribute it to the asphalt heat.




Subject: Melanzana and Red Italian Replies: 1
Posted By: nas33 Views: 838
 
Hey All,

have a suspicion that Melanzana and Red Italian UCD are the same variety.

Thoughts?

I have both, so in time Im sure I will find out, but Im impatient as usual...

Subject: A Big Fig Leaf Replies: 5
Posted By: nas33 Views: 947
 
ive noticed huge leaves on Lemon (encanto).  If i get a chance i will post a pic...

Subject: Sal's Corleone = Palermo Red (Aldo's) Replies: 13
Posted By: nas33 Views: 2,766
 
Could this be the same?

Attached Images
jpeg 3-9-10_608.JPG (671.72 KB, 85 views)


Subject: IS DORMANCY NECESSARY? Replies: 9
Posted By: nas33 Views: 3,444
 
I heard the chilling requirement for figs is something low like 100 hrs at 30*-40* F.

None of the trees I kept in my warm house over winter due to their young age and rarity produce fruit for me in the summer.  They like a little sleep, but try to wake them up as early as possible to start building those heat units if you live in the northeast.  You can get them going surprisingly early if you employ a few tricks.

Good luck


Subject: Col De Dame(white) Replies: 39
Posted By: nas33 Views: 3,726
 
I have CdDW from Jon.  Can anyone comment on its virility vs. the Euro sources?




Subject: Best fig crop yet! Replies: 14
Posted By: nas33 Views: 1,674
 
Picked these today 9/12/10.

The best one on this day was Palestine and Excell coming in second.

Overall, the Paradiso is my fave but not on this day.

All main crop...

Attached Images
jpeg photo.jpg (157.56 KB, 59 views)
jpeg photo(2).jpg (159.10 KB, 69 views)


Subject: Best fig crop yet! Replies: 14
Posted By: nas33 Views: 1,674
 
Hi Grant, the natalina are all main crop and yes it is from grimo.




Subject: Best fig crop yet! Replies: 14
Posted By: nas33 Views: 1,674
 
My best was 46 at one picking, see below.  About 2 weeks ago...

Attached Images
jpeg 3-9-10_579.JPG (621.45 KB, 94 views)


Subject: Biancheta Replies: 3
Posted By: nas33 Views: 794
 
Yes my verte is from grimo.

I have about 4-5 small plants on top of my mother plant.  Now that I think of it, I may have to have a plant sale next spring! :)




Subject: ID This Beautiful Unknown Fig Replies: 8
Posted By: nas33 Views: 1,137
 
Thanks guys, great info.

I am going to prod my friend to ask his brother where he got it from.  You see, my friend actually took the plant from his brother just to give it to me.  I thought nothing of it at the time, now I am happy that it is tasty, productive and could be Sicilian, a region a don't have varieties from.

Will let you know if I find out anything else.



Subject: Hardy Chicago n Dark Portuguese Replies: 10
Posted By: nas33 Views: 1,401
 
Martin, your HC and Drk Prt are very similar in taste and looks?

My DP figs are about 3 times larger than the HC and more elongated.  Skin is slightly rubbery with white flesh, red pulp.  A totally different fig.  Different sources I guess.  The true name/origin of the "dark port" has always been in question...




Subject: ID This Beautiful Unknown Fig Replies: 8
Posted By: nas33 Views: 1,137
 
Sicilian Red?  Hmmm, interesting...

Well if it turns out to be, then great!  Im just happy it tastes very good and looks fantastic.




Subject: Hardy Chicago n Dark Portuguese Replies: 10
Posted By: nas33 Views: 1,401
 
The HC was my fave standard sure shot up until this year.  Now its still delicious and reliable, but I guess I take it for granted and its more like like my snacking fig as I wander in the garden.  My 1 year old daughter crushes three in about 2 minutes, about 3 bites a fig.
I havent given up on the dark port all together, but I may have to lend it to my brother to raise so I can keep the room (and my sanity).



Subject: Biancheta Replies: 3
Posted By: nas33 Views: 794
 
This summer is convincing me I like green figs a touch more than black.  When its hot, the green ones really shine.  The black ones I find are more reliable in the northeast and can produce without blazing heat.

Verte
Texas Everbearing White
Latarulla/Ficazanna
Paradiso (half green half purp)

All delicious.

Nelson, that fig looks cute and tasty.




Subject: ID This Beautiful Unknown Fig Replies: 8
Posted By: nas33 Views: 1,137
 
Hi All,

Any thoughts on what this is?

Its sweet and tasty, juicy and produced one of the tastiest brebas I had all year. Second crop is prolific.  I received the plant last year from an a friend at work of Italian descent.  I mention it only as a clue.

Any help is appreciated.

Attached Images
jpeg 3-9-10_608.JPG (671.72 KB, 143 views)


Subject: Hardy Chicago n Dark Portuguese Replies: 10
Posted By: nas33 Views: 1,401
 
Martin,
the first two pics are dark port and the third is HC.

Sorry no ripe fruit of the dark port to display.  I ate it before I took a pic.



Attached Images
jpeg 3-9-10_598.JPG (791.56 KB, 34 views)
jpeg 3-9-10_600.JPG (716.73 KB, 43 views)
jpeg 3-9-10_606.JPG (736.75 KB, 48 views)


Subject: Hardy Chicago n Dark Portuguese Replies: 10
Posted By: nas33 Views: 1,401
 
I don't know, I didn't love my dark port.  Large, great looking fig, but rather flat flavor, poor texture.  Its not a young tree either, its about 3-4 years old at least.

Adriano warned me that it wasn't that tasty when I got it from him about a year ago, but its valuable for trade I suppose.  Maybe our humid Toronto summers are unfavorable for its ripening.  I found the port figs appreciate drier weather and less watering than say Italian figs which absolutely love their roots moist and don't mind humid conditions.

For each their own in the end.



Subject: Another (Paradiso bronze),pretty and flavorfull fig! Replies: 33
Posted By: nas33 Views: 3,640
 
My paradiso also came from dusan and its tied with Verte for my favorite fig.

Definitely not a Brunswick.  Brunswick has five finger leaves very distinguishable.

Paradiso was bronze in the greenhouse last year and outside this year mixed green purple just like Nelsons.  I think the hotter the weather, the darker it gets.  The first one this year I ate was about a week ago.  This year it was knee buckling good.  Sweet, delicate, fine grained, juicy, depth of flavor, what else can I say.
Its such a great fig, I want 4 more plants.  I want to limit the collection just so I can have more Paradiso.
Akram, like Nelson said, it ripens mid to late august in warm summers.  I have mine in a sun trap which is my south facing wall of my brick bungalow on the asphalt, with little wind.  The figs love it and I'm sure its mostly responsible for me eating figs since June 30th in 6a.  My brothers paradiso plant 4 blocks away, not in such a favorable position as mine has not ripened a fig yet.

Man, I love this fig.



Subject: Least Favorite so far Replies: 10
Posted By: nas33 Views: 1,219
 
Nelson, I'm beginning to feel the same about Brunswick.
Huge figs, prolific, very sweet even, but something about their texture and overall flavor that doesn't sit well with me.

They don't have any character, I think its a variety that appreciates a very dry hot summer because in our humid Toronto summers it splits badly on me.  Same with Capelas, but I can excuse the splitting because that fig is sweet and rich, even when under ripe.

 


Subject: Bursa black figs (very large and very sweet) Replies: 18
Posted By: nas33 Views: 4,163
 
Bass, Ive also heard it was a Smyrna type and needs the wasp.  My cousins wife is from turkey and she said 90% of the varieties in Turkey need the wasp. 

Nas


Subject: Best figs at your location Replies: 308
Posted By: nas33 Views: 76,645
 
M8V Toronto, ON

So far after 2010, I will recommend these:
Natalina
Hardy Chicago
Desert King
Paradiso "Nero/Bronze"
Lattarulla
Verte (Purely on taste alone)
Colsanti Farms Dark
Unknown Calabrese Italy-Red
Kadota/White Texas Everbearing
Palestine Black
Ficazanna
VdB
Easy to grow, all reliable and from good to excellent in regards to yield.

Cant wait until 2011.


 




Subject: Please tell me which figs smell Replies: 39
Posted By: nas33 Views: 5,386
 
To me they smell spicey, almost like coconut and allspice or something.

When you burn the wood in the fire, you can definitely tell.  My wife was surprised when I pointed out she was burning old fig wood and I hadn't seen what she had put in the fire.


Subject: Pinching Why? Replies: 22
Posted By: nas33 Views: 1,998
 
Vivian,
if the tree is less than 2 years old I would leave it be.  Let it develop some root mass and grow how it wishes.  Then you can head back/pinch the central leader to encourage side shoots. 
However, I should mention there are exceptions.  I had a cutting last year that grew to 12 or more nodes and at the beginning of this season I headed it back and it is doing terrific, even setting fruit on laterals and shoots.  I think this cultivar is just extra vigorous.  Also an exception would be a plant made from a sucker.  Sometimes those are very vigorous and upright so they need to be headed back sooner.
Regarding your second point about "keeping them in line", I would say it all goes back to pinching, age of the tree, overall demeanor of the plant, etc, etc.  If your trees are over 2-3 years old and are too vigorous (over 6-8 leaves), by all means pinch and keep in line.  Remember, I don't want too vigorous of a plant in my zone, I want my branches at most 8 leaves and even that can be too much. 

Martin, thanks for the pic.  It sucks when you put effort into a tree and it gives you no love in return for your time invested.




Subject: Pinching Why? Replies: 22
Posted By: nas33 Views: 1,998
 
Vivian,
if the tree is less than 2 years old I would leave it be.  Let it develop some root mass and grow how it wishes.  Then you can head back/pinch the central leader to encourage side shoots. 
However, I should mention there are exceptions.  I had a cutting last year that grew to 12 or more nodes and at the beginning of this season I headed it back and it is doing terrific, even setting fruit on laterals and shoots.  I think this cultivar is just extra vigorous.  Also an exception would be a plant made from a sucker.  Sometimes those are very vigorous and upright so they need to be headed back sooner.
Regarding your second point about "keeping them in line", I would say it all goes back to pinching, age of the tree, overall demeanor of the plant, etc, etc.  If your trees are over 2-3 years old and are too vigorous (over 6-8 leaves), by all means pinch and keep in line.  Remember, I don't want too vigorous of a plant in my zone, I want my branches at most 8 leaves and even that can be too much. 
Martin, thanks for the pic.  It sucks when you put effort into a tree and it gives you no love in return for your time invested.




Subject: Pinching Why? Replies: 22
Posted By: nas33 Views: 1,998
 
Hi Vivian,

equalization of the sap refers to balancing the growth in the tree canopy.  No one branch should be much longer than the others.  They should all be approx the same distance from the main trunk.  Many old time fruit growing books refer to this as a secret to growing fruits sucessfully in containers or otherwise.

If you look at the veteren fig collectors trees, they all seem to be well balanced growth wise.

Hope this helps


Subject: Pinching Why? Replies: 22
Posted By: nas33 Views: 1,998
 
Hi Vivian,

equalization of the sap refers to balancing the growth in the tree canopy.  No one branch should be much longer than the others.  They should all be approx the same distance from the main trunk.  Many old time fruit growing books refer to this as a secret to growing fruits sucessfully in containers or otherwise.

If you look at the veteren fig collectors trees, they all seem to be well balanced growth wise.

Hope this helps


Subject: Pinching Why? Replies: 22
Posted By: nas33 Views: 1,998
 
thanks Martin, I appreciate the info.

I need to increase the canopy on my containerized trees so pinching will help.  I also understand that equalization of sap amongst the branches is important for fig trees to fruit abundantly.




Subject: Pinching Why? Replies: 22
Posted By: nas33 Views: 1,998
 
Hi Everyone,

If I pinch at the 6th leaf, will it encourage a fruit bearing shoot that will produce fruit THIS year, OR is this process only to help ripen the 6 or so figs that have developed on new growth thus far, while encouraging more branching for next years fruiting?
Im curious from others experience if they have had figs from these post pinching shoots in the same season.
Any advice is appreciated...


Subject: Birds and Unripe Figs Replies: 17
Posted By: nas33 Views: 5,789
 
Thanks for the advice everyone.

Jon, I guess it could be a squirrel, but I found they dont usually mess with the potted figs.  I know they didnt drop on their own because I am with my trees every day for a least an hour and would notice brebas on the ground.  Jon, you mention that they would leave a remenent of the fig , ie. a stem, but I am thinking they would pull by the stem easily taking the entire fig off.

I netted the ghosh and king and built a scarecrow.  The robins are not scared, but I dont think they were the ones in my trees.

We will see, hopefully I have so many figs I dont mind sharing...
Nas


Subject: Birds and Unripe Figs Replies: 17
Posted By: nas33 Views: 5,789
 
Hey Everyone,
So I walk out to my backyard today and I see this bird fly out of my ghosh plant (in container).  I start looking at other brebas and I have noticed my crop of king has shrunk about 40% and the ghosh has missing figs too.

Is it possible the birds want the unripe figs?  I heard birds are more fond of yellow/green figs and basically avoid the dark ones.  I netted them and even built a scarecrow! 
I noticed Jon mentioned to wait to net until they start to ripen, but I fear that if I wait, it will be the end of Kings season-already.  Is there a reason I should wait?  I used half inch...
Maybe its squirrels?

Thoughts?

thanks!


Subject: Raspberry Latte Climate Replies: 41
Posted By: nas33 Views: 3,980
 
I find that when a cutting has secondary growth off of the scion, ie second branch, or if it has a second flush of leaves on single branch, you are probably doing ok down below.
However, you can have lots of leaf and no roots, or lots of roots and not one leaf.  I have both happening this year. Fico Nero BC-healthy roots, no leaf. St. Jerome, 3 branches, no roots.

I would ask Jon about the Raspberry Latte.  Im thinking it will probably do better in a container (that is what I plan to do with it).  However, I grow everything in a container.

And yes, I have found it very vigorous.

good  luck


Subject: Main Crop Emerging Replies: 6
Posted By: nas33 Views: 759
 
I noticed main crop on:
verte
HC
Natalina
Excel
Ghosh
Capelas
King(but Im pulling them off to concentrate the breba)
Colsanti
Lattarulla
Kadota
Bifara (maybe it will ripen this year)
Brunswick
Dark Palestine

Strange, nothing on dark port
Then again, I have a greenhouse so Im ahead of the game for 6a.  They have been outside for a week and so far no leaf scorch or wind burn.
I have a good feeling about this year, the trees seem loaded with figs.  Much more than last year.  Maybe the melons will finally live up to expectation.



Subject: osborne's prolific Replies: 4
Posted By: nas33 Views: 765
 
Ive had problems with it.  Both my plants died.  I had one start from a cutting last year and it was doing well and then all of the sudden-dead.
I received a plant from JKS out east and I killed that too.

Seems sensitive to me...

Anyway, good luck!


Subject: Limestone Screening vs. Limestone Chip Replies: 6
Posted By: nas33 Views: 5,835
 
Thanks Ox, Akram, that is good info.  Totally makes sense...

I am going to experiment with it at some point, but first I need to be eating consistently using the tried and true methods of our community.




Subject: Limestone Screening vs. Limestone Chip Replies: 6
Posted By: nas33 Views: 5,835
 
Does anyone know if these are the same thing?  The limestone screening is the stuff you use under patio stones,  pathways, etc.
I'm considering experimenting with this as I have heard a mulch of limestone chips is good for potted fig plants...




Subject: Encanto Farms: attn: TX, FL, Canada Replies: 14
Posted By: nas33 Views: 1,265
 
Jon knows Im in for this idea if need be...

Paul, Akram, whatever works to get us more varities.  Although, we are doing pretty good.

Talk to you soon




Subject: Encanto Farms: attn: TX, FL, Canada Replies: 14
Posted By: nas33 Views: 1,265
 
Great to hear Jon.

Nelson, yes $$$ indeed, but space as well!  Nas


Subject: what is your favorite fig to eat? Replies: 23
Posted By: nas33 Views: 2,225
 
Verte
Paradiso "Bronze"
Colsanti Dark/ "Italian Fig"
Hardy Chicago
VDB
Sucrette
Latarulla

In no particular order, but verte and the bronze paradiso are bloody delicious and Colsanti and VDB are hard to beat.  I don't have fruiting size of sucrette, but I have tasted it.
Nas


Subject: Will Figs Ripen Properly in a Greenhouse? Replies: 13
Posted By: nas33 Views: 6,027
 
Thanks Herman.  I learned about the need to transition carefully from greenhouse to outside just recently with my VdB.  I never thought it would harm the leaves, but I think it caused them to curl up at the edges.  Almost looked like it was short on moisture but didnt need watering. 
Im going with Fignut plan.  Plus added advantage of having the greenhouse space for the guava, x tra tomatos eggplants and cukes.


Subject: What Have you Learned this Season? Replies: 4
Posted By: nas33 Views: 812
 
Thanks Ottawan, good info especially for us in the north.  I definitely would not have even thought about it.




Subject: Will Figs Ripen Properly in a Greenhouse? Replies: 13
Posted By: nas33 Views: 6,027
 
A little update.

I was reading in Eisen's The Fig, that in order for the figs to ripen properly, they must be exposed to the winds and direct sunlight.  Its in the chapter on Fig culture.
Also, I cant remember the name of the source right now, but recently I read another piece on growing figs under glass and it mentioned that if the fig trees were to be in the "grapehouse/stovehouse"(in this particular article) all year, the house must be very well ventilated and the trees placed very close to doors in order to provide them the extra air and access to the rays of the sun.
Now I am not saying this is definitive, but I knew many other growers that ripen all kinds of figs outside and last year I maybe ate 30 figs.  And the trees that produced the most for me were actually outside the greenhouse for 75% of the summer fruit growth and only brought in for the last month or so after I noticed how many figs they were growing and thought the greenhouse would be "better".

Its going to be a hot dry summer in the northeast and I'm pretty certain I'm going to keep all my fruiting trees outside until late late summer or very heavy rainfalls.

Will keep everyone updated if I find anything interesting.

Take care
Nas


Subject: What Have you Learned this Season? Replies: 4
Posted By: nas33 Views: 812
 
Hi All,

Thought I would start a thread discussing some experiences/learning's we have all had this season.  If I had this info summarized for me last year or the year before, I would have saved myself a whole lot of aggravation. 

Here are some of the things I have learned, experienced or thought about:

1) For me there is nothing better than using Spag Moss to start your cuttings.  Pardon the expression, its idiot proof.  All I do is rinse the cutting under very warm water, then soak it for about 3-30 minutes (depends how much time I have) in very warm water.  Then I put it/them in a Ziploc bag with about a handful and a half of wrung out spag moss and zip the bag up with a little air in it.  Then I check on it about every 3 days or so.  So far, 98% success (last year 5%), no mold, no sterilization needed which hurts the cuttings vitality, I can root dozens and dozens of cuttings in a very small area and no moisture management work.  Ive found SM holds the moisture level perfect in the bags.  Once I see visible 1/4+ plus roots I pot up.  Be careful with the roots, they are tender.  I leave some of the SM attached to the roots and pot them up with it.

2) I have been using a slow release fertilizer for all my smaller, non-fruiting plants.  Since there are usually more of those than established fruiting trees at any given time, I find the slow release provides the convenience for the volume of plants.  I still use regular water soluble MG for my larger plants.

3) Started using a very weak 1/4 strength 12-4-8 fertilizer once I saw roots  in the cups about every 3rd water and I have had very good results so far.  I never thought cuttings needed fertilizer so early, but from what I have seen, they clearly benefit.

4) Once the cuttings are in cups/containers, I have found the weight of the container to be the best gauge for the need for watering.  I have heard many members of F4F warn about over watering young cuttings and its good advice.  I guess this one is more feel, but once you start doing it, the feel comes pretty fast.

5) I could never figure out why I would lose cuttings in a matter of a day or so that were seemingly doing great .  This year I cupped my cuttings from the top creating a mini greenhouse over every cup.  I left the cups on until the leaves were bursting out and I saw tertiary root development.  In the past, my leaves would fall off and the terminal bud would dry out because the the leaves were losing moisture quicker than the small roots could replace it. Worked fantastic this year and to me was a significant reason for the increased success.

6) I gave my cuttings growing in cups light from a simple fluorescent set up and again, I feel it helped tremendously.  I was always told cuttings don't need light, but my gut was telling me they needed light to provide energy to the buds that often swell.  Those buds are going to help feed the cutting so it can push roots.  The cuttings in the SM Bags are near the lights, but not under them.

7) Established figs in containers need LOTS of water.  I underestimated this last year.  Of course media used, environmental conditions, etc affect this.  This year I definitely watered more earlier in the season than last and I think it has helped with overall development. 

8) Figs need patience.  I still don't have any, but you need it.  I'm working on it though.  Its funny, I'm considered pretty impatient, but I take up gardening?

9) Not to be corny, but this whole fig collecting/growing thing is really amazing.  Think about it:  the collective knowledge of our fig community has been unmatched in history.  The only reason most of this info exists is because we share our experiences and learn and grow every day.  We all know the fig is way under represented in the annals of horticulture and without others like yourself, we would still be in the stone age so to speak. 

Obviously I learn something new almost every week, but that is what makes it fun.

I hope this helps some how and I can't wait to hear about others experiences.

Take care,
Nas
6a

Subject: Will Figs Ripen Properly in a Greenhouse? Replies: 13
Posted By: nas33 Views: 6,027
 
Thanks everyone for all the great advice. 

I think its worth the test, so I will probably test both ways.

Perhaps we can report back on this thread when the Brebas start ripening.

My Desert King has about 40 nice brebas on it so we will see.  Last year it had none (long story).

Nas


Subject: Will Figs Ripen Properly in a Greenhouse? Replies: 13
Posted By: nas33 Views: 6,027
 
Hi Everyone,

Since getting my greenhouse about a year or so ago, I've been digging deep for info on growing figs/fruit in greenhouses.
One peculiar piece of info seems to come up every now and then.  I can't quote the sources, but I would estimate I have read mention about it in 4 different places.

The piece of info is that figs wont ripen properly if grown under glass.  More specifically, your taste and yield will be reduced if the trees are kept in the greenhouse the entire growing season..

Last year, the first year of my greenhouse and serious fig growing, I would say my crops were very meager.  I had about 15 bearing age trees in containers, so I should I have eaten well.  I didn't.

I chalked it up to young trees, poor weather, improper root pruning, not enough water, too much fertilizer, etc...but maybe it was the greenhouse?

Let me ask:
1) If the trees should be producing fruit, do I keep them in the greenhouse all season?
2) Or is it better to move them into the greenhouse only to extend the ripening season?  Basically, do I start them out in the greenhouse until the night time temps remain above 15* Celsius (late May in 6a) and then move them outside in the air and back under glass in late August Sept Oct?  I could see this helping varieties like Black Madeira, etc, ripen in my zone.

I know someone has the info I need.

thanks
Nas



Subject: The mice and the fig Replies: 15
Posted By: nas33 Views: 2,427
 
I put cat hair from my cats brush all around my fig trees when they are asleep in the greenhouse over winter.  I just assumed mice would love the greenhouse during the winter, so I have always put the hair near the trees and so far, never any mice.

Plus my cat is a ridiculous hunter and he catches all kinds of mice and birds during the year.  Good for my garden, bad for wildlife.

Now if he could just catch squirrels....

Nas


Subject: Early start on Main Crop Replies: 24
Posted By: nas33 Views: 1,285
 
Thanks for all the work and pics Nelson.

For the record, I hope they are different varieties.That would make it even cooler seeing as I bought my colsanti on a whim at Sheridan nurseries last year for $20.  Didn't even really take care of it.  I left it in its original pure peat potting mix for like two months before I up-potted it into a 2 gallon with pure compost to fill in the space.  Terrible practices, but the darn thing still gave me like 15 figs and they were delicious.
This year I have given it extra TLC and treated it properly so I am expecting a bumper crop.
Cant wait to compare!



 

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.