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Subject: Early start on Main Crop Replies: 24
Posted By: nas33 Views: 1,285
 
I checked my colsanti yesterday and looked for the red on the leaves, but didnt see it.  From what I know, leaves can vary significantly within plants of the same variety.  You can have up to 6 types of leaves on the same variety from what I seen.

My best guess is ripening time, taste and appearance of the figs.  I use the leaf test for last.




Subject: Early start on Main Crop Replies: 24
Posted By: nas33 Views: 1,285
 
Remember, the hardy chicago is from Sicily as well.

Time will tell this summer.  I am predicting a good summer for figs!

Nas


Subject: Having More Fun Replies: 4
Posted By: nas33 Views: 806
 
Thanks for all these cool stories Martin.

I love to try different ways of doing things with figs, I cant even get to my all of my ideas!
By the way, my sticks that I had water with an aquarium stone bubbling didn't proceed beyond root initial stage.  I just took them out and planted them out in the open in the garden for kicks. See how tough they are...

Take care
Nas


Subject: Earliest Leaf-out Variety Replies: 2
Posted By: nas33 Views: 626
 
All of mine are in containers:
1-verte
2-excel
3-king
4-Ghosh
5-Kadota
and on and on...

One thing I noticed is that even though we had a very mild winter for 6a, the plants broke dormancy at almost the same day as last year which was a brutal winter.
Although, this year, they just seem "peppier" than last.

Nas



Subject: Early start on Main Crop Replies: 24
Posted By: nas33 Views: 1,285
 
I have the "colsanti" Italian fig.  Its a dark fig, small like hardy Chicago or Natalina.  I found the figs very similar to the hardy Chicago and I have heard that it was probably hardy Chicago from others.  When I compared the figs I would agree.

Very sweet and a good producer for me last year.  Total surprise.
Tasty
Nas


Subject: rooted cutting or just stored energy Replies: 7
Posted By: nas33 Views: 553
 
Thanks Gents,

I'm not patient and you need patience when working with figs.  I'm beginning to learn that if they are going to root, they are going to root and I shouldn't insist on knowing when and where each step is along the way.  Its nature and nature does its own thing.  Let them be I keep telling myself.

I'm using turface, SM, perlite and a little bit of compost.  Probably don't need watering either...

thanks again
Nas


Subject: rooted cutting or just stored energy Replies: 7
Posted By: nas33 Views: 553
 
Hi Martin,
So if its stored energy in the cuttings, is the leafing out in the pictures a bad thing?

Should there be roots?  My cuttings are in a similar situation, but I feel they are generally doing well (I THINK??)  I just thought I don't see roots yet because the clear containers I have the cuttings in are giant 40 oz size.

Nas


Subject: Congratulation to Nelson Esteves on the birth of his first child Replies: 44
Posted By: nas33 Views: 2,267
 
Congratulations Nelson, its the best thing in the world.  I had my first child a baby girl, in August of 09 and it will never be the same.
I recently red in Mens Health that in their top 100 of Male "Super Foods" (or something like that), they placed Figs 26th on the list.  Figs are full of antioxidants and other good stuff and I have always thought they kept you young vigorous.

All the best to your new family,
Nas



Subject: Best Air Layering On Yr 1 or Yr 2 Wood ? Replies: 17
Posted By: nas33 Views: 2,698
 
Paul, I had good success with layering off of 3 year old wood, although 2 year also works great.  I'm just guessing 4+ year is a bit too mature.  I think I know the reason, but at this moment, I just cant remember the details from the horticulture classes I took.

Talk to you soon,
Nas


Subject: When to fertilize rooted cuttings? Replies: 6
Posted By: nas33 Views: 903
 
Small amounts of top quality compost or high end, light professional potting mixes (i.e. Pro mix hp, or I believe UPM in the USA) added to rooting medium is an option as well.  I could see the nutrient release being "calm" for the new young roots using these types of ingredients.  Then when they reach 1-2 gallon size and need to be potted up, both Bass's (above) and Jon's approach (see his presentation) are sound approaches.

When they are growing well in the 1-2 gallon pots, very dilute fertilizer applied more often in "snacks" seems to be a popular strategy.

Take care...Nas


Subject: fig on cutting Replies: 2
Posted By: nas33 Views: 476
 
I asked the same question not too long ago.

I think the consensus has been to remove them once they are about the size of a BB just to make sure its a fig you are pulling off and not a bud.

I have been doing that with this years batch and I have noticed once I removed the small figs, the cuttings put forth more buds and leaf growth (which my gut tells me is good).

Good luck




Subject: unwrap your trees Replies: 6
Posted By: nas33 Views: 809
 
On Sat/Sun I removed the insulation from the greenhouse and started organizing things.
I also root cleaned/pruned and repotted/potted up about 15 trees.  Finally, I pruned and shaped.  I still have to unwrap about 6 of the big ones and prune/shape as well while at the same time potting up about 8 more.  Lots of work, but the type of "work" I could get used to!

All of them are resting in the greenhouse.
I looked at the 14 day weather trend for Toronto and it seems that other than a few flurries on Monday, its going to stay comfortably over 0*C.

Here's to eating so many figs at one sitting that they all start to taste the same.
To all a fruitful fig season.
Nas
6a



Subject: An Earlier Start On Driveway Replies: 21
Posted By: nas33 Views: 1,166
 
If you start them too early, does it help/hurt fruit production?

Does it strain the tree to start too early?
Any thoughts?
just thinking out loud...Nas


Subject: How much light to give , how soon Replies: 11
Posted By: nas33 Views: 1,030
 
Good point by Jon, my lights are not very powerful.  They are grow bulbs, but not High pressure sodium or anything like that...
Direct sun when outside would probably not be a good idea in the early stages.

All of these techniques will work to some degree.  There probably isn't one "best way", but that's what makes figs frustrating and fun at the same time!

Regards,
Nas


Subject: Something Different For Me Replies: 3
Posted By: nas33 Views: 650
 
Martin that is amazing, so much for needing a node.

Obviously SM is powerful stuff.  I am very interested in how this all turns out (and your aeroponics system too!)
thanks
Nas


Subject: How much light to give , how soon Replies: 11
Posted By: nas33 Views: 1,030
 
I start giving cuttings light about a week after I put them in cups.  I use a standard shop light ballast modified with grow bulbs from home depot.  Nothing special.

I figure that if they were being planted outside or in an orchard, they would basically be getting 12 hours of light and 12 hours of dark, so I am trying to replicate that.  My greatest success's in rooting happened in my greenhouse during the summer with natural light patterns, so I am considering it a variable I would like to explore further.
Good luck!
Nas


Subject: And we worry about mediums Replies: 10
Posted By: nas33 Views: 1,578
 
It is common to see fig trees growing in the cracks of sidewalks in the middle east...

Its a tough tree I think.
Nas


Subject: Accidental Rooting Technique Replies: 10
Posted By: nas33 Views: 1,204
 
I am very confident in the properties of SM.  To me, it is fool proof.

Today I did some experimenting:

1) ziplock storage bag, cut along one side.  I laid the baggie on a flat surface and I laid wrung out SM on the inside.  Then I sprinkled moist turface (very little) and a little seaweed/kelp meal (like seasoning with salt).  I laid the cuttings on the SM about 2 inches apart and rolled the baggie up with the cuttings inside.  If you can picture making sushi rolls. The tips of the cuttings stuck out about 2 inches max. Held the pack together with elastic bands.  After I had about 4 "packs" I rolled all of them up in a towel to keep them dark and another few plastic bands.
2) I am trying the baggie method with only a little moist SM in the ziplock.
3) Attempting root two cuttings in a cup with water using an air stone from an aquarium.  I heard it will work.  Lets see...

I am using Chilean 5 star that I found in a huge compressed block 2.5'x2'x2'.  I let it soak for at least 15 minutes in slightly warm water.  When I am ready to use it, I squeeze out the water firmly and separate the long threads.  If I am using it for cup-rooting mix (turface, perlite, SM ,hydroton, and a little compost), I shred SM first before I moisten.  In the applications above, I leave it "whole" so to speak.

I will try to post a pic of the results.

Thanks!
Nas

Subject: Fig videos with Ray Givan Replies: 27
Posted By: nas33 Views: 4,671
 
Jason, great find, wow, I would never see that in Canada...
awesome
Nas


Subject: Paradise Nursery Replies: 6
Posted By: nas33 Views: 979
 
thanks everyone! I thought I had seen the list before, but I couldn't get the website to come up.
Its a nice list, but to be honest, it really puts Jon's work into perspective.

Take care for now
Nas


Subject: Paradise Nursery Replies: 6
Posted By: nas33 Views: 979
 
Hello All,

Does anyone have a list of the varieties they carried?

Thanks!
Nas


Subject: Love looking at Pictures Replies: 44
Posted By: nas33 Views: 2,515
 

Attached Images
jpeg HugeBlack_vs.Brunswick.jpg (463.81 KB, 37 views)


Subject: Love looking at Pictures Replies: 44
Posted By: nas33 Views: 2,515
 
Hi Everyone, great shots!  I am getting all fired up for this season.  I

Martin, those figs look knee buckling!  By chance is the last pic a VdB?  It looks very similar to the one I have...

Keep em coming everyone
N


Subject: Figs before Roots or Leaves??? Replies: 9
Posted By: nas33 Views: 786
 
Thanks Ottawan,

You know its your cuttings. 

I am not sure I want to mess with removing it right now as I may just not see the roots yet.

I definitely have a bud on another cutting, but I couldn't get the pic resolution to agree so I could post it...

N


Subject: Love looking at Pictures Replies: 44
Posted By: nas33 Views: 2,515
 
Hey All,
Its that time of year.  I'm getting restless and I miss the garden!

So what I do is look at pictures of the plants, the greenhouse, cuttings, etc.  It helps me get through Feb which, in my opinion, is the worst month of the year in 6a.

Many pics made me smile, but I settled on just one, so I'm passing it on.  I encourage you to post a couple pics of your set up, or your favorite plant, cuttings, a beautiful fig.  Anything to help us all keep the blood flowing!

Nas

PS.  Jon, I really think your manage attachments option is the easiest one I have ever used on a forum.  Good work.

Attached Images
jpeg Greenhouse.jpg (610.99 KB, 143 views)


Subject: I'm Steamed this Morning!!!! Replies: 15
Posted By: nas33 Views: 920
 
I feel your pain, that sucks...

I stress about it all the time when I am getting/expecting cuttings.  I find all the drivers in my area very nice ( FedEx (Well I know him very well), UPS (Great guy) and Purolator, but I guess I'm still cynical and expect the worst.

The other thing us Fig nuts have to worry about is freezing while in transit.  I ship everything express anyway, but I know if it goes Ground there is a good chance its going to sit in a trailer at least one night  on its journey.  Not good.

Good luck Oxankle,  I hope it was just bad luck...

Nas


Subject: Figs before Roots or Leaves??? Replies: 9
Posted By: nas33 Views: 786
 
I know I first learned about cuttings getting leaves before roots, or roots before leaves from Jon, but can anyone explain why this cutting of MBVS has a fig swelling on it?
I am quite certain it wasn't on the cutting when I planted as I would have removed it.
I hope the picture is visible, but if not, you get the point...

Nas



Attached Images
jpeg photo.jpg (183.25 KB, 56 views)


Subject: I'm Steamed this Morning!!!! Replies: 15
Posted By: nas33 Views: 920
 
To me, this is a very interesting topic as I have worked for FedEx for over 12 years.

The standard for a delivery to resi is to leave the package in safe spot (as long as value is below I believe 400$) if the sender does not request signature.  Most of my customers do not request signatures for resi shipments as it adds to the cost.

However, we are not business's that have to worry about cost structures, and if I was sending important fig cuttings I would ask for the signature and pay the surcharge.  By the way unless you need an adult to sign for the package, the option "Indirect Signature Required" will suffice.  Adult signature implies you want FedEx to verify age with ID. 
Good luck everyone!
Nas


Subject: Preference For Total Sweetness or Good Flavour ? Replies: 15
Posted By: nas33 Views: 1,067
 
Paul, I definitely prefer flavor over flat out sweetness.  However, there is something special about eating a super sweet fresh fig in Canada zone 6a.
I found lattarula Grimo a very sweet fig versus something like VdB which was wonderfully jammy raspberry.
One thing I used to believe was that you couldn't get "flavor" unless the fig was dark.  Now I know I was naive.  I have tasted light colored figs that had vanilla cream soda tones. 
Lets face it I love them all, just put them all in a huge bowl and lets go sit in the back yard and chill....
Only 61 more sleeps until bud break*...ahhhhhhh
Nas

*based on last years break on or around April 3rd


Subject: Potting Soil Ingredients update pics Replies: 10
Posted By: nas33 Views: 1,665
 
the mulch I have looks like chopped pine park nuggets.  It looks similar to a picture I once saw of Bass lawnmowering a bunch of nuggets.  Based on the pics I have seen of Taplas mix, it looks the same and I have had good results thus far...

N


Subject: Potting Soil Ingredients update pics Replies: 10
Posted By: nas33 Views: 1,665
 
Hi Bass, can you elaborate on the difference between the nuggets and the mulch?  Isnt the mulch basically broken up nuggets?

Nas


Subject: Fig trees from Seed Replies: 22
Posted By: nas33 Views: 3,933
 
yeah, its probably not worth it.  

Its tricky sometimes to decide where to spend the energy.  The fig has a certain mystique around it.  I can find books upon books on apple growing, peaches, etc, but very little consensus on whats best for the fig. 

I guess that's why its great we can all share our knowledge in a place like this forum.

If I were to group my priorities aside from the pure fun aspect (which is 90% of it for me, oh yeah and the EATING!), I would say:
1) expansion of distribution of current known varieties to ensure preservation
2) continued trialing of known varieties to determine their worth in specific zones
3) broadening knowledge of cultural techniques with consideration given to zone and variety

Best,
Nas


Subject: Fig trees from Seed Replies: 22
Posted By: nas33 Views: 3,933
 
Hi Fignut,

well if the chances of getting a common fig are almost zero then, I probably wont bother.  I'm in 6a.
IF % of getting a common type were higher, the next question would be how to coax the seedlings into earlier fruit production so the decision could be made quickly.  Ive read that some Israeli researchers have had success with early fruiting for testing with intensive growth techniques but I cannot get details on the procedure.

Jon, you mention the fig seeds from Turkey, aren't most of the types from turkey Smyrna or San-Pedro that would need the wasp anyway?  Ive always kind of wondered what type of effort I should put into attaining varieties from Turkey.  My cousin is married to a Turk and they go regularly to Turkey.

Nas


Subject: Fig trees from Seed Replies: 22
Posted By: nas33 Views: 3,933
 
Thanks Jon and Jason, I appreciate the input.

I suspected Jon played around with seedlings.  I have read much of the same info you have regarding starting from seed.
However, I am still confused how my contact claims to have seeds from certain fig varieties.
1) where do they get the seeds?
2) if they have a particular variety, whats the process of getting "seed" from that type? 
3) how do they control how the seed was pollinated?
4) is the process of obtaining seed from these types similar in any way to obtaining seeds from say the cucurbit? family (melons, cucumbers, squash) where there is a process involved of segregating plants/flowers etc

Unfortunately, I cannot get much clear info from these people with the seeds because there is a language barrier and I cannot discern (YET) if they can verify if others have successfully started from seed and are ACTUALLY eating fruit from those trees.

If I had acreage I would have no problem doing trials, but I'm in resi area and my lot is 54' wide by 134' deep and I have to be careful adding useless varieties, even with sexy names.

If anyone else can speak on this, jump in...

Nas





Subject: Fig trees from Seed Replies: 22
Posted By: nas33 Views: 3,933
 
Hello Team Fig,

Can anyone comment on if there is any circumstance where growing figs from seeds is worthwhile?
I believe the seeds have come from trees that have been caprified.
I am considering experimenting with growing some varieties from seed and I need some guidance.

Its just for fun, but I don't want to waste too much time.

Let me know your thoughts.

thanks as always
Nas


Subject: my first ripe fig of the year Replies: 11
Posted By: nas33 Views: 1,222
 
Bass, awesome as usual.

My family is going to Jordan again this summer and I will see if my brother can attain this type.  As you know, I already have a couple varieties from Jordan ("Jordanian Black", "Jordanian Honey"), but no fruit yet so I cant compare.  I couldn't get the "Jordanian Large Early" to catch.

Ive mentioned before, the culture of figs in the Middle East runs deep and the above is just another example.  I'm working hard to add to the work Bass has already done helping expose North America to the many varieties that exist there.

Wonderful!

thanks Bass

Nas

Subject: Planning a fig growers meeting Replies: 51
Posted By: nas33 Views: 2,427
 
Little John,
I live in Toronto and travel to Buffalo regularly for work.

I would love to be able to meet up with you guys in August and will definitely try.  I encourage others in southern ON who are interested to touch base with me, perhaps we can meet up there.
Bass, your idea is fantastic, I think it may a be a bit far for me to travel, but who knows what the future holds. 

Nas

p.s.  I wish there was an exception for fig trees crossing the borders.  The restriction is really stupid.

Subject: Canadian UPM Replies: 15
Posted By: nas33 Views: 1,228
 
I have had great success with 

1 Part Pine Bark Mulch
1 Part Granite
1 Part Hydroton (a fired clay product often used in hydroponics.  Looks like coco puffs cereal).  I am also intend on using Turface MVP this coming year in part to replace the Hydroton.

I wish I could take credit for this great mix but I cant.  Its Tapla's.  However the Hydroton was my substitution for Turface at the time because I couldn't get it.  Now I absolutely love Hydroton.
The 1 percenter in me still throws a scoop or two of my special homemade compost in the mix although Tapla would disagree.  I have also found that a "mulch" of compost on some of my potted fig plants seemed to improve their overall health.  But its only a guess, its way too early to conclude the compost had anything to do with it and those plants in particular were not in the "Taplaesque" mix. I am planning a different fertilizer regimen this year that will include micro nutrients so I can probably avoid the compost and save it for the garden.
Anything with peat, sand, manure, compost, perlite, cocoa shells, triple mix, etc in my original mixes I have noticed that it seems to disintegrate around the tree and collapse.  The mix above has held up really well for me and its a keeper.Keep in mind there are positives and negatives with everything in life and the mix is no different.  I can list my observations if anyone is interested in hearing more.
Sorry I sort of sidetracked us.
Nas


Subject: How to Force Dormancy? Replies: 19
Posted By: nas33 Views: 1,288
 
Nelson,

if its 6 months old, that explains it.  I agree with John, there is no rush. 


Subject: How to Force Dormancy? Replies: 19
Posted By: nas33 Views: 1,288
 
If its young, I find the same issue.  4 of my plants (all of them young) still have leaves.  I say you cant fight it, so let it do its thing.  "teach it a lesson", that's good.
Good luck
Nas


Subject: Natalina Replies: 22
Posted By: nas33 Views: 4,381
 
I have a Natalina from Grimo and its fruit is similar to Hardy Chicago but more fruity and a little larger.
I also have a Natalina that I was told was from Italy that appears to have very late ripening fruit, with a different shape. The tree is probably 4 years old, but 09 was my first year with it.  The fruit didn't even come close to ripening whereas the Grimo Nut form was full of edible fruit and probably 2-3 years old.

Nas




Subject: Dormancy Broken. Replies: 10
Posted By: nas33 Views: 1,272
 
It seems the younger the plant the longer it takes to go dormant and the sooner they break dormancy.  If they are young I wouldn't worry too much because fruit production wouldn't be expected anyway.  Dieseler is correct the trees only need about 100-200 chill hours.

Lesson learned though:  if the trees are 3 or more years old they should be stored where its cold.  That is the strategy I follow.  If the tree is young they are stored in a cool room/cantena which is dark and about 10 degrees Celsius.  That way the young ones are safe from freezing.

I used to stress about this issue but after speaking to many seasoned vets in horticulture, the best way to sum it up is: "They cannot fight their nature to grow and neither can we."

Good luck Paul, I am sure they will be fine.

Nas

Subject: Touching Figs Replies: 5
Posted By: nas33 Views: 1,020
 
Hi Everyone,

A while back while my mom was visiting my garden and I was showing her the progress of the figs on the trees, she said something that stuck in my mind.  She said that I should never touch the young fig because that would cause it to stop its ripening progress.  Our family in the Middle East has been growing fig trees on their properties for generations. Even though the info stuck, I never really followed the advice because I'm amazed by the changes the fig goes through during its growth cycle and I cant resist.

While reading Eisen 1901, page 55:
"Care should be taken that the young figs are not injured or even touched.  If they are, they will not come to maturity."

Seeing as I am in zone 6, I have a hard enough time getting enough ripe figs as it is and it made me wonder if my fig touching is not helping my cause.

Can anyone confirm or deny these two sources of this information about touching young figs?

thanks
Nas


Subject: Figs in the Greenhouse Replies: 9
Posted By: nas33 Views: 867
 
I have a greenhouse in zone 6a Toronto and I use a heater with a timer to moderate the temp.  It does not come on at all between 7 am and 4 pm and then comes on every two to three hours for 20 minutes at a time at night until about 6 am.  During the winter it sometimes gets a bit warm during a very sunny day, but nothing to worry about in my opinion because at most it will be warm for a few hours from say 1 pm to 230 3 pm then it cools down outside considerably even if its sunny.  And on partly or fully cloudy days, it is very cool in there.
One thing to note with my greenhouse is that it is 16 x 8 and I line the inside with a combo of bubble wrap and poly tarp during the dormant season as a form of insulation. I think that diffuses the direct rays of the sun during a bright sunny winter day therefore keeping it cooler.
Mario, I wonder if the small size your greenhouse is the reason it gets so hot?
Nas


Subject: The fig: Its history, culture, and curing, with a descriptive catalogue of the known varieties of figs (1901) Replies: 8
Posted By: nas33 Views: 848
 
I mean just a regular pdf of it...thanks

Subject: The fig: Its history, culture, and curing, with a descriptive catalogue of the known varieties of figs (1901) Replies: 8
Posted By: nas33 Views: 848
 
Does anyone have a clean PDF of this book?
Pls let me know, maybe you can attach it and email it to me...
thanks!
Nas


Subject: good insulation? Replies: 16
Posted By: nas33 Views: 846
 
Hi Fignut,

its regular packing type bubble wrap from a packaging supply place in toronto.  I bought a huge roll of if last year.  The widest you will find "off the rack" is 4 feet.  Trust me, I searched high and low, but in order to get wider than 4 feet, you need to make a custom order$$$.  I also wanted the 8 feet wide as that is very close to the height of inside wall of my greenhouse.
One thing to note is that the bubble wrap is the "big bubble" type.  The bubbles are about an inch and a half wide and half inch high.  Compared to the small (1/4 inch) bubbles that dont insulate as well.  More airspace=better insulating factor in my opinion.
Any plant 1 year or younger, probably wont be affected long term by not getting a formal dormant period its first  year.  Its safer for them to be in a cool basement or "cantena/coolroom" for their first year, especially with the rare types.  As long as its below 60 F/15C they will be fine.  And I sleep better when I hear the wind howling at my window knowing the youngins' are safe downstairs and the "adults"are in the greenhouse.
According to my family in the middle east, the fig trees never really go fully dormant.  Or if they do, no one even notices it because its so brief. The issue of dormacy is very complex and it gets even more complex when a bunch of us fig crazies are trying to grow a tropical fruit tree like ficus carica in places where it snows!
Nas



Subject: good insulation? Replies: 16
Posted By: nas33 Views: 846
 
I insulate my greenhouse in winter with bubble wrap and polytarp/vapour barrier.  I make a drop ceiling with the segregate the trees within the greenhouse with a curtain to create a smaller area to moderate.  The bubble wrap works very well, but its in a different application than you have described.
I like to avoid "foams" of any type because they are tempting for mice to burrow into.  They love that stuff, especially when it gets cold.
If my trees were in an insulated garage (with insulated door), I would simply wrap them with burlap and put them as far away from the entrance as possible.  If you are so inclined, you can add a blanket or I find that horticultural fleece (sometimes called floating covers) is terrific. I have experience with an insulated garage and the trees were fine.  Now I use a greenhouse.
Nas
zone 6a



Subject: fig orchard and varieties in Palestine Replies: 10
Posted By: nas33 Views: 1,750
 
Bassam, fantastic find, of course very close to my heart.  I will keep my comment about the "developments" to myself.
Either way, its very nice to see these pictures of Palestine.
Im sure I have a few of these varieties, but they are too young to ID for sure.  In time though. 
Figs in the middle east have a deep culture around them and Im always suprised at the breadth and depth of the varities.  For me in terms of interest, its figs from the middle east and then figs from Italy.  Both have a long history and a fantastic amount of variants.






 

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