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Subject: think UC Davis cuttings will come earller this year? Replies: 89
Posted By: satellitehead Views: 5,885
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob

Jason, based on your story, it seems like newbies should be warned more to keep a sharp lookout for RKN than for FMV.  Seems to me the consensus is FMV = mildly annoying, whereas RKN = potentially devastating.

 

Rob, all I'm saying is ... it's in the eye of the beholder, not my place to make that call for everyone.  Everyone should at least have the option.  In some places down south (like Florida) or anywhere with sandy soils where RKN is able to move more easily, they may argue that point.

 

Additionally, it's not clear which has more impact on growth - RKN causes some growth problems, but so does FMV.  Which is worse?  Dunno.  Don't want to find out.

 

Wish I knew then what I know now.


Subject: think UC Davis cuttings will come earller this year? Replies: 89
Posted By: satellitehead Views: 5,885
 

I've tried everything known to man. Without shaving an entire dog (we had to adopt ours out due to baby) and dropping it on the pot, not sure how I'd go any further than I've already tried.


Subject: Ag Inspection Replies: 16
Posted By: satellitehead Views: 1,831
 

I've never seen FMV impact the appearange of fig wood.  If it doesn't, it's theoretically impossible for anyone to enforce FMV-infected material.


Subject: think UC Davis cuttings will come earller this year? Replies: 89
Posted By: satellitehead Views: 5,885
 
Bugs, a mite spreads FMV.  There's no telling how long it would take.

Subject: think UC Davis cuttings will come earller this year? Replies: 89
Posted By: satellitehead Views: 5,885
 

I'm with Cathy and Jon on this one, but I feel compelled to point out something that's probably important....

There are two types of fig collectors out there:  Those who believe infections like RKN or FMV are impossible to avoid and the others who actually believe (or reportedly have) pathogen-free plants. 

I think it's important we all understand newbies probably haven't made this distinction yet and that they don't have all the facts, thus someone needs to bring it up so they actually have a chance to make that decision on their own before diving in face-first on the decision without knowing.  Nothing sucks worse than getting into a hobby and realizing you screwed up on day 1 and can't take it back.

I'm in the "FMV is inevitable" category, and I usually trade and obtain cuttings from sources I know have FMV because I don't care.  I'm not running a nursery, so the appearance of my young trees is not of any consequence.  Even thought I'm of this mindset, especially with newbies, I'm still going to make sure people know very clearly that FMV exists, there is no known cure, there are several other pathogens which infect figs, and many (if not all) seem to multiply in environments like UCD's orchard.

I think it's super important for everyone to grasp that any time you take cuttings from anyone, you risk introducing new pathogens and nuisances into your landscape or orchard.  I am a prime example.  Between two nurseries, I managed to get 5 fig trees that were infected with RKN and I've been fighting with mild RKN ever since, to the point I'm not even comfortable sharing my figs with anyone outside of GA.

I've gotten in the habit of quarantining any plant that shows a single knot on the root (which could realistically even be from the damned potting soil I buy!!).  Unfortunately, this doesn't always work.  Just last week, I had a squirrel jump into my quarantine area, chew their way in, dig in an infected pot, then hop out and dig in part of my main collection.  I don't know if it hit the clean stuff first, then hit the infected stuff or what, so I've got airlayers galore and my quarantine area filling up right now trying to overcome the situation. 

It's an uphill battle - all because I wanted the instant gratification of figs the next year (!!!) and decided that buying from a nursery was the way to get there. (hindsight 20/20; wish I knew then what I know now....)

Anyway, just my 2¢, take it or leave it.


Subject: think UC Davis cuttings will come earller this year? Replies: 89
Posted By: satellitehead Views: 5,885
 

RW,

 

Beware that all of the plant material you'll get from UC Davis is infected with Fig Mosaic Virus (FMV) and will show signs of this malady in a number of ways - mottled leaves, deformed leaves, stunted growth, etc.  There is no known cure for FMV and it can spread to healthy plants/trees in your nursery.  The plant material from UCD undoubtedly may have other viruses which aren't widely documented. 

 

With that said, if infected/infectious material is worth obtaining to you, you may want to read this thread again, all the info you need is above. If you missed it after a second read, jump back to post #21.   It links to another thread (one of probably a half dozen you'll find here using the search feature) that will give ultra-explicit details on how to order.

 

Good luck!


Subject: Ag Inspection Replies: 16
Posted By: satellitehead Views: 1,831
 
I believe the address was edited out of the picture.

And... Australia? Are they still hunting to put more charges on George K?

Just another reason for folks to be careful when shipping or receiving to/from foreign countries!!

Subject: Questions about NEW rooting method Replies: 14
Posted By: satellitehead Views: 1,297
 

Fruit production requires significant energy, it saps energy reserves in your plant, redirecting crucial energy to places it shouldn't be at that age/size.  It takes a good amount of energy for an actual tree to produce fruit, much less a twig, and a half gallon is pretty small.  To boot, first-year fruit tends to be pretty worthless, and (at least with my Italian Honey trees) the breba crop is really not that great already. 

 

I'd always encourage knocking off fruit on something that small so the maximum energy goes towards building up that trunk and vascular system. 

 

I've stunted the growth of far too many fruit trees and fruit bushes being stubborn and leaving fruit on.  I almost killed two of my blueberry bushes a couple years back because I had to have fruit the first year in-ground.  I picked off the other three bushes of fruit (planted same year).  That was four years ago.  The bushes I plucked fruit off of are 3'x3' in size and well branched.  The two I left the fruit on are still less than a dozen twigs thinner than a pencil and hardly a foot tall or wide.

 

Just sharing my experience.


Subject: Questions about NEW rooting method Replies: 14
Posted By: satellitehead Views: 1,297
 

Womack, if that tree is something you just rooted recently, I'd break those figs off.


Subject: Playing around (rooting) Replies: 45
Posted By: satellitehead Views: 2,196
 

I also found the same using this 'new baggie' method (tall skinny bags).... up-potting with very few roots had waaaaay better success.  I lost almost every tree that I let send roots out of the bottom of the bag.  The ones above that had greater root development had a much harder time recovering after transplant from bag to pot.

 

I do not recommend allowing a lot of root development with this method.  When you get a couple of roots an inch or two long, I'd carefully up-pot.


Subject: I need some opinions on up potting. Replies: 29
Posted By: satellitehead Views: 1,523
 

nah, it just seems like (with pot culture) first year is growth, no figs.  year two typically doesn't see a lot of breba, but a few main crop figs possible.  year three is usually more breba crop figs and a better main crop than year 2.  from there on out, i've had pretty steady increases year after year.

 

obviously, this is subjective and influenced by a number of things.


Subject: I need some opinions on up potting. Replies: 29
Posted By: satellitehead Views: 1,523
 

My experience has been, "third year's a charm"


Subject: Playing around (rooting) Replies: 45
Posted By: satellitehead Views: 2,196
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by TucsonKen
Jason--what's your plan for the one (third from right) that leafed out under the soil? Will you cut a hole in the bag for the shoot to grow out of, and then plant it on its side, or wait for another shoot to sprout higher on the cutting, or what? Just curious.

 

I wanted to follow up on this.  That cutting died.  I snapped off the one that was rotten on the end and up-potted it with the shoots close to the top of the soil line (barely buried).  It just didn't seem to have enough energy.


Subject: Questions about NEW rooting method Replies: 14
Posted By: satellitehead Views: 1,297
 

Yes, you'll find it here:  http://figs4fun.com/Rooting_Bag_New_Style.html

 

That link was down for me just now, so here is a thread I made that revolves around that method which should work.

 

http://figs4funforum.websitetoolbox.com/post/Playing-around-(rooting)-5477383


Subject: Unknown cuttings: "Hobart", "Schuyler", "Voiture #217" Replies: 97
Posted By: satellitehead Views: 5,971
 

yes, look three posts above yours.  JD tasted it in post #62.


Subject: Found another curious nearby fig ("Unknown Morley") Replies: 91
Posted By: satellitehead Views: 5,518
 

Alright, it's official, the Morley parent tree is a goner.  The new owner dug it up and re-landscaped their backyard.  So, this makes two potentially awesome trees gone (Morley and Voiture). 

 

I'm incredibly happy I found this forum and was able to send cuttings of both trees to at least three dozen people.  From one fig tree, many.  I hope it turns out to be a winner.  I've got breba figs on my couple of trees already.  Keeping my fingers crossed!


Subject: Questions about NEW rooting method Replies: 14
Posted By: satellitehead Views: 1,297
 

I had more problems with perlite using that method, so I started using more like 85% potting mix and 15% perlite.  Pre-moisten the mix, bag it, put it in a sealed box, never water it again.  They can go for 3-4 months without needing any water.


Subject: I need some opinions on up potting. Replies: 29
Posted By: satellitehead Views: 1,523
 

I up-pot year round.  I can't tell you how many new roots I found in some of my coming-out-of-dormancy trees, they were generating a lot of root material while dormant.  A lot of times I've heard people indicate that "when no top growth is happening, bottom growth is exploding".  This seems to be hit-or-miss to me.

 

I haven't seen a lot of impact on cropping after up-potting trees with figs... but it's best to do it now, since there seem to way less varieties with good breba crops and more with great main crops.  Actually, ripping off your breba figs (as I've seen others post) can lend to the main crop setting earlier.  Again, not up north, so I've never really had to test this out.  I can ripen till early December.


Subject: Leafing to early Replies: 14
Posted By: satellitehead Views: 1,187
 

I had the same issue.  I just ran the lights in the basement (fluorescents) during the daytime - turned em on when I was walking out the door on the way to work, turned em off on my way back in.  No white growth, a little light green, but not white.  I waited till they got a few inches of growth and put a couple dozen outside this past weekend, a few I had to up-pot before setting out.  Everyone seems happy, but I realized I didn't trim a few down short enough, so looks like I've got some airlayering ahead of me :)


Subject: I need some opinions on up potting. Replies: 29
Posted By: satellitehead Views: 1,523
 

I personally stopped judging when a plant needs to be up-potted based on caliper, but I don't fault anyone for doing so, it's a no-brainer method that can work. 

 

I find it much more effective to base it on the roots.  I posted a thread on how I do things, in the event it might help someone:  http://figs4funforum.websitetoolbox.com/post/Some-tips-on-uppotting-5390290

 

Just another viewpoint to share.


Subject: leaf tip curled rot? Replies: 4
Posted By: satellitehead Views: 635
 

Mine recovered after 3-4 weeks of regular watering - not overwatering, just regular watering.  I have seen others on here post that you should flush, I erred on the side of caution because I was concerned that overwatering would drown my young tree.  Overwatering has killed far more trees than over-fertilizing (which has claimed zero) for me.  Fertilizer will shock a plant, overwatering will flat out kill it via rot or other means. 

 

I wish there was a way to get the word out there about liquid fertilizer and young trees, I've tried preaching about it in the past.  I know everyone wants "what's best" for their trees and a lot of folks think, "aw, hell, I want to give my tree the best nutrients possible"... and this happens.  I found that diluting down to 1/4 strength could work when trees hit a certain level of maturity and have a solid root system in place, but I normally don't start dicking around with fertilizers until my trees are filling out root-wise in a 1gal pot.  You're better off just using a slow-release fertilizer mix if you want to go that route - BUT - I wouldn't recommend mixes with slow-release fertilizer until you've at least made it to filling out a nice half-gallon pot (at least)


Subject: leaf tip curled rot? Replies: 4
Posted By: satellitehead Views: 635
 

Looks like what happened to me when I used MG liquid on my newly rooted trees.  I'll never do it again.  I've talked to several others who had the same experience.  That stuff isn't created for seedlings/new starts, it's like feeding methamphetamine to a baby.


Subject: Help! Replies: 8
Posted By: satellitehead Views: 843
 
Ok. Here is the thread about the dark green/wilted edges:
http://figs4funforum.websitetoolbox.com/post/Some-tips-on-uppotting-5390290

Did you recently up-pot your figs? Did you recently fail to water for a couple of days to the point the leaves drooped extremely?


Subject: Help! Replies: 8
Posted By: satellitehead Views: 843
 
The dark edges on the left hand photo looks like the result of root damage. I can link to some pics later. The white void on
The leaves is absolutely sunburn.

Subject: Help! Replies: 8
Posted By: satellitehead Views: 843
 

James is correct.  This is sunburn.  You didn't properly acclimate your plants to direct sunlight.  Also called "leaf scorch".  See:  http://figs4funforum.websitetoolbox.com/post/This-is-what-quotleaf-scorchquot-looks-like-5304488?highlight=leaf+scorch


Subject: Cajuns Came To Visit Replies: 4
Posted By: satellitehead Views: 625
 

Gene and Linda are good folks.  Our visit was far too short when they came through town last year.  Maybe next time ;)


Subject: Suggestion: Cuttings and plant requests to pinned threads Replies: 3
Posted By: satellitehead Views: 662
 

I dunno.  As someone that has been pretty vocal about "contribute and people will contribute to you",  I think offering a section that would give 'carte blanche' to anyone a place to "drive-by" forum members begging for cuttings is a bad thing which would be detrimental to the community as a whole.  Those who contribute around here know who else contributes and many go out of their way to alert others to send cuttings to them for inspiring and sharing with the community at large.  I often recommend out to my regular traders people who have contributed a lot to this community for sharing.

 

Not sure what's up, but I feel like there's been an increase of folks (from Indonesia here lately) signing up with the sole purpose of bombing threads on the forum asking for cuttings, offering money and other profits if you'll send them cuttings.  This bothers me beyond words.  It's not limited to the public, either - I had yet another person sign up this past week that private messaged me asking me for cuttings.  I find this behavior rude and inappropriate.    I think it would get worse if there was an open place for anyone to bomb the forum.

 

I'd argue that there's been a thread to discuss wants (link) and even that has gotten bombed by drive-by-requests from people who posted half a dozen times and disappeared, never to be seen again.  It also entices some to capitalize on the members to help.  Member aeilee comes to mind, I know several that got pulled in on that story and got ripped off. 

 

I dunno, maybe I'm just jaded.


Subject: Solar-assisted wireless thermometer for $9.99 Replies: 5
Posted By: satellitehead Views: 655
 

I would pay good money to see a video of that.


Subject: Salvage a Moldy Cutting by grafting? Replies: 22
Posted By: satellitehead Views: 1,276
 

Bill, I would agree with you.  I typically leave my cuttings in a zip-top bag for at least a day with no cloth prior to sending them to anyone.  I'll usually take a full sheet of paper towel, wet, wring out completely and fold up into a ~2"x3" square and drop into the bag (not touching the cuttings) for the sole purpose of slight humidity, then send out to the recipient.  I stopped wrapping the cuttings - they don't need it.

 

I have never heard problems with mold, and in some cases, I've had to keep the cuttings on my desk for weeks before shipping (just had this happen for almost a week with cuttings that went out today).  Never had them mold.  they usually won't root with that little bit of moisture either, but also don't perish, so ... win-win if you ask me.


Subject: Solar-assisted wireless thermometer for $9.99 Replies: 5
Posted By: satellitehead Views: 655
 

I checked as of ~5 minutes ago and they still had some left.  Until the "I want one" icon starts bouncing, they're high on supply.

 

Sales stop at 1PM EST (4 hours away).


Subject: Salvage a Moldy Cutting by grafting? Replies: 22
Posted By: satellitehead Views: 1,276
 

There are some products out there specifically designed to combat rot.  Physan is one of them which has come highly touted by some here.

 

With that said, mold seems to love dead food much more than live food, or at least I believe this has been my experience.  I mean, mold just loves food, but more often than not, cuttings I've received which are persistently moldy like that tend to have very little "umph" left in them.

 

Not sure what to advise on this one.  I mean, if I was having that much of a problem, I would probably try a few different rooting methods... maybe try rooting a couple in a cup of water with a half thimble of bleach, try a couple in straight sand?

 

EDIT:  Took too long to submit.  Got distracted with dinner.  Looks like James beat me to the punch on the Physan. 

 

EDIT:  Jeez, Dom beat me to it also.  I'm slow today :\


Subject: Unknown cuttings: "Hobart", "Schuyler", "Voiture #217" Replies: 97
Posted By: satellitehead Views: 5,971
 

I totally missed this update until today.  Thanks for reporting back, JD.  That last picture doesn't look a lot like Celeste, looks more like a Brunswick, but the "not water or spoiled after rain" quality is contrary to what I've heard nearly everyone say about Brunswick.  The mystery continues.  I should have fruit on my trees this year.  Still have a Schuyler for you as well...


Subject: Action in the South, Spring is here. Replies: 15
Posted By: satellitehead Views: 1,323
 

Gene, hoping the best for your trees.  Sending some warm vibes your way.  It's looking like we're possibly in for a night of snow flurries/slush, possibly tomorrow.  I saw what this front did to Texas, I figure it'd be hitting you guys last night.


Subject: Solar-assisted wireless thermometer for $9.99 Replies: 5
Posted By: satellitehead Views: 655
 
FYI, for today only (while supplies last), Woot's 'sellout' site has a wireless thermometer that some folks may find useful @ $9.99 + $5 shipping.  You can order up to three of them and shipping remains $5, so ... for 2 you're looking at $24.98 shipped, and 3 will set you back $34.97.

The remote wireless temp sensor can transmit up to 100' with no obstacles, so it could be ideal to keep he base station in the house and the remote temp sensor in, for example, your greenhouse or near your plants outside to monitor temps around the pots for heat/freeze.  Runs on batteries but also has solar cells to extend battery life.  The outdoor sensor is good from -4 degrees Fahrenheit to 140 degrees Fahrenheit (-20 degrees Celsius to 60 degrees Celsius). 

I've done plenty of business at Woot (50+ purchases over the years), solid company to do business with.  Easy to get addicted to checking their other sites (woot.com and deals.woot.com) every day.

Anyways ... I'm buying two to add to my current thermometer setup, thought I'd share.

Subject: ficus sycomorus cuttings? Replies: 25
Posted By: satellitehead Views: 2,987
 

Iwan, sounds like you're looking for pretty much everything.


Subject: Action in the South, Spring is here. Replies: 15
Posted By: satellitehead Views: 1,323
 

Woke up this morning around 7am.  19º outside.  Figs in the garage, already have brebas galore.


Subject: I need help with a Fig ID Replies: 27
Posted By: satellitehead Views: 2,079
 
No fig war and no offense. I'm not upset, definitely not trying to squabble or argue and I don't feel like anyone else here is either.

Brown Turkey figs I know rarely looks that fuzzy inside when properly ripe. Chalk it up to bad selection of photos. Ive got pics of ones who arent fuzzy. I have seen that fuzzy-inside thing happen with BT, but it is not the norm, it only occurs in maybe 1 out of 20 fruits on my tree.

I tend to agree with George. There are so many different "Brown Turkey" strains out there (just like Celeste), who knows which is which and what is what? (more on that later)

My point is - just like with Celeste - there are dominant "never fails" qualities that scream "I am this specific variety". I say that as someone in an area where BT and Celeste make up 75% or more of the local trees, and there is a tree on every other block (thousands in Atlanta). With Celeste, that unique teardrop shape, small fruit size, often dusted lookin skin that tends to crack and wrinkle when ripe, elongated neck or long stem, all these the strongest characteristics of Celeste. When you see a Celeste, there is no doubt (for me, at least) that it is a Celeste variant.

If I am to trust that Monrovia has a "true" Brown Turkey, and what's been sold in Georgia as "Brown Turkey" the last century is actually "the" original Brown Turkey, then i will be the first to exclaim the original "true" Brown Turkey has many telltale characteristics that make it fairly easy to identify (just like Celeste has its unique characteristics that define its variety). I say this as someone who has driven around north GA and documented dozens (maybe hundreds) of similar trees in Atlanta.

The fruit pictured in the first post of this thread has the prominent white freckles over the purple skin (fading to green at top) which many BT here have, typical fruit shape and size, a big open eye that will crack a bit when ripe to form a "star" sometimes, that same decent sized interior void which is so common in BT, although some are different sizes and textures, same interor color (pinkish and sometimes tan when over-ripe), along with that general 5-lobe leaf that is predominate on most BT near me... It is all there.

If I saw this tree in my area, I'd have probably called it a BT (or BT variant). Of course, I would have never made the definitive call locally until I sampled the fruit and noticed it had that characteristic, piss-poor "sweet but watery" taste that BT figs always have. It is truly the worst, most boring tasting fig I have ever had and you know it well when you taste a few dozen. With that said....

If the fruit is sweet and watery with no richness whatsoever, there is no doubt to me that this is a variant of the original "Brown Turkey" or possibly "the" original Brown Turkey. Not EBT or California BT or one of the other fig which is supposedly a BT variety but doesn't necessarily look or taste like plain old "Brown Turkey".

I would just add one thing - ask any of the other guys here at F4F who live in Georgia and they'll probably confirm - when you ask most people in Georgia what kind of fig tree they have, many will say "it's a Brown Turkey" or "Turkey fig". When you ask why they think that, they will tell you, "well, the fruit is brown, must be a Brown Turkey!". Truth is, many people are ignorant to the fact there's more than two or three types of fig tend to think every fig is a "Turkey fig" or "Brown Turkey" because they have no idea that the variety most often sold as Brown Turkey isn't actually a "brown fig".

With this in mind, I must say that I (personally) doubt whether some varieties with "Brown Turkey" in the name are really a "Brown Turkey". I am skeptical that maybe California Brown Turkey, EBT, Improved BT and others probably got "Brown Turkey" attached to the name because someone saw they were sort of brown, reddish brown or brownish purple and figured, "must be a Brown Turkey!".
This is only a guess, and until genetic testing is widely done on every possible variety, we may never know just how "wrong" the current naming is. This is why I tend to go by characteristics rather than name. I tend to think Monrovia has a true Brown Turkey because - I kid you not - it tastes like crap, worse than any other fig, and this is a common comment about Brown Turkey.

And the fig confusion continues to expand out of this world.... ;)

Subject: I need help with a Fig ID Replies: 27
Posted By: satellitehead Views: 2,079
 

First, here is my Brown Turkey ripening Breba in June:  http://figs4funforum.websitetoolbox.com/post/first-brown-turkey-breba-of-the-year-4767918

 

Some notes before you judge based on my tree:  My BT sometimes has unusually large fruit and is still young so often the fruit are pear-shaped.  Not sure where Monrovia got their stock, but all of the Monrovia BT have large figs like this.  Notice the white freckles.  Also, please know that this fig is on the NORTH side of my house in FULL SHADE.  This affects the fruit shape, size and the color (they don't get very dark).

 

Here is the tree I found about 100m from my house:  http://figs4funforum.websitetoolbox.com/post/Letdown-...-another-BT-5398318

 

I didn't take a picture of actual ripe fruit so I would not use this as a comparison.  I just want to post it because I said I would post.

 

See also:

 

http://figs4funforum.websitetoolbox.com/post/show_single_post?pid=1272089239&postcount=16

 

You probably (maybe George also?) want to check this thread about BT varieties (note many of the figs pictured are Celeste variants):

 

http://figs4funforum.websitetoolbox.com/post/Will-the-real-Brown-Turkey-please-stand-up!-5498398

 

Need more proof it's Brown Turkey?  See:

 

http://figs4funforum.websitetoolbox.com/post/Name-That-Fig-5495920 

 

Don't judge Brown Turkey on leaves, here's a variety of leaves on mine, and another reason you can't judge many varieties on the leaves:

 

http://figs4funforum.websitetoolbox.com/post/show_single_post?pid=41210339&postcount=20

 

Here is an extremely ripe BT from my Monrovia tree.  Like, almost rotten ripe ;)

 

http://figs4funforum.websitetoolbox.com/post/show_single_post?pid=41371106&postcount=8

 

 


Subject: I need help with a Fig ID Replies: 27
Posted By: satellitehead Views: 2,079
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by gorgi

@ satellitehead:
So what the heck is a true BT?!

 

This is the question of the century. 

 

All I can say is that his fig is a perfect match to a local BT one block from my house.  It has all of the same characteristics of shape/size/leaf size/void/colors/white freckles/etc.  The fig near me is sweet but watery like many BT I have tried locally.  The one near me also has smaller fruit (as this one does) than my BT from Monrovia, which made me think it wasn't another BT.  I will go find the thread from it and link to it so you can see.

 

If the pictured fig didn't have a void, I would never say it was BT.  Sal's C (mine) doesn't have a void like this and the fruit is more round than the original poster's fig (again, mine doesn't so much).

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by premiumguide
Jason,

.... your description of the fruit .... "The interior has a small cavity and is peachy possibly a little pink in color. The exterior was reddish- purplish with maybe a hint of green and little white freckles like on VDB. The eye rips open slightly on many and resembles a small star." ... seems to be on the money too. I'd say some get a strawberry pink, but they never quite get red inside. The fruit in my sliced pics were so ripe they were starting to lose their firmness.

My figs have a very sweet flavor and they attract a huge amount of flies if I don't keep up on the harvest. 

 

Sounds like a BT more than ever.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by premiumguide
I am curious, ... is it unique to be able to start harvesting in the first week of August? ... IIRC, that only happens if we have good Summer rains.

 

My Brown Turkey begins to ripe main crop in August every year.


Subject: I need help with a Fig ID Replies: 27
Posted By: satellitehead Views: 2,079
 

Lots of Brown Turkey traits in that one.  Even if it's SC/Aldo/SR/BD/GM17.  Fruit is smaller, but the void, pulp color, skin cracking, skin color, eye... much like my BT (Monrovia) fruit.


Subject: Fig killing weather on its way Replies: 16
Posted By: satellitehead Views: 1,243
 
Looks like I get to dig shuffle again this weekend... Lows in the 20s.... Saw that comin from a mile away....

Subject: think UC Davis cuttings will come earller this year? Replies: 89
Posted By: satellitehead Views: 5,885
 

Man, now I can't recall if I actually submitted a form :\  Was it that time already?  I guess I should go look, eh?


Subject: my transition zone Replies: 1
Posted By: satellitehead Views: 457
 

best of luck!


Subject: Popp's Purple Replies: 17
Posted By: satellitehead Views: 2,882
 

I totally forgot to update this post when my Popp's ripened a fig very very late.  The tree was also from JV, and it was only a foot tall in a 1gal pot when it ripened the single fig. 

 

It was not bad, but had to pick the fig due to freezes coming, it was a week or two early, it was good, but ... not as amazing as a few others.  It tasted young and I'm hoping for magnificent next year.


Subject: Figs Are Breaking Dormancy Here In Arizona Replies: 6
Posted By: satellitehead Views: 738
 

I am now up to about 10 plants that have broken and are leafing out.  Some only slept for ~4 weeks.  I'm bugging out about it a little bit because extended days of spring temps this early on in the year means lots of fig shuffling for me for the next 2-3 months :\


Subject: Anyone answer a question about AU Rosa plums? Replies: 54
Posted By: satellitehead Views: 4,833
 

Don't order from Willis.  I get all my rootstock from Raintree Nursery or Johnson Nursery and they never fail me.  Raintree has a great universal selection; Johnson has a great selection for the SE USA, and their people graft on-site, they also answer any and all questions with great recommendations, so ... if you're buying from them, they would be a great help if you can catch them when they're in the office-trailer.


Subject: Another wrinkle in the bird battle Replies: 9
Posted By: satellitehead Views: 681
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TucsonKen

If only they made little glass figs as Christmas decorations!

 

sounds like you've got yourself a might fine eBay business idea there, Ken.  ;)


Subject: Anyone answer a question about AU Rosa plums? Replies: 54
Posted By: satellitehead Views: 4,833
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by JD
Yes, but only after I find a suitable rootstock. I am in search of a commercial solution (Nemaguard or Flordaguard) as well as native seedlings (Gutherie or Chickasaw). Once I have those, I will follow up.


Ok, just know that - knowing these - bud break will be in the next 4-6 weeks.  I'm seriously thinking about removing one of my two AU Rosa trees and replacing with something else.  I'm considering pears or mulberries, and I have cuttings of both right now, so .... Sad, they're just getting to a good size.  I'd feel bad about cutting them down.

Quote:
Originally Posted by saxonfig
Hey Jason. Sorry to hear that those failed on you. Do you know what happened?


Not a clue.  As you can see, I had some shoots, but the shoots shriveled up and died (even after nipping all the below-graft growth).  I truly have no idea.

Quote:
Originally Posted by strudeldog

I am going to try and graft the ones I picked up Sunday on my existing plums and pluots. I am not a big fan of multi-graft trees, but there is so much I want to try and not sure how much limited space I want to dedicate to fruit that I will probably lose the bug battle with. I have not grafted plums before , but if I fail it's only a few branches on a existing tree


I'm still thinking hard about all of the ideas you and Michael seeded in my head at the swap.  Especially grafting branches of "good" pears onto some local bradford trees, totally topworking a bradford pear, and keeping up with old stock by "rogue grafting" onto trees that hang out in the public right-of-way. 

Subject: Anyone answer a question about AU Rosa plums? Replies: 54
Posted By: satellitehead Views: 4,833
 
100% failure within 3 months. You want cuttings?

Subject: Guess Who Is Waking Up Replies: 9
Posted By: satellitehead Views: 893
 

Dennis, mine are in the unheated garage, the first 3'-5' of wall is concrete and underground, one entire wall is two thin garage doors, and it's only insulated on 1/2 the walls and the entire ceiling, temps usually sit around 50-60, but it's still cooler than it is outside....

 

Ah well.  I don't mind, I guess.


 

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