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Subject: EDIT: Trades Done.Thank you! Trade: Fig Cuttings for Fruit Tree Scion Replies: 6
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 599
 
@ Alan.
You think Carpathian would even make it in Z6? Not that I wouldn't be open to giving it a try. Maybe someone else with some extra material will help me out this season anyway. But thank you of course.
My plan is to graft onto some black walnut seedling rootstocks I started about 3 yrs ago.

@ Phil. Thank you for your kind offer. Yes, I did receive a good number of varieties from you previously. Pretty sure I got several of those to take (pluot, peach, & nectarine I think. But no plums yet). Sadly, I left many of those scion in the fridge until well past my spring grafting window. Then I plain forgot about them in July-Aug when I might have tried some chip budding. I still have those in the fridge but not sure if they'd still be viable. Should check on them again anyway.

Aside from just having some nice stone fruits in my orchard, my eventual goal is to do a couple super multi-grafts. I'd like to see just how many different types I can get going on one tree. Just for fun mainly but should make a very interesting specimen as an experiment, a conversation piece, as well as the fact that it should prove to be quite a site - especially in the spring.

If you don't mind Phil, I would like to see a list of what you have. Very much appreciated.  

Subject: EDIT: Trades Done.Thank you! Trade: Fig Cuttings for Fruit Tree Scion Replies: 6
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 599
 
Looks like I've got enough trades to keep me busy for the rest of the year. Thank you all very much. 


I"m looking to trade some fig cuttings for a few varieties of "other" types of fruit tree scion if anyone is interested.

I will trade 2 pieces of any given fig variety for 2 pcs of any given fruit tree scion.

Here's what I have to offer:
- Long Yellow
- Jurupa
- Blue Celeste
- Troiano Calabrese
- Beall
- Italian honey

Here are the types of scion wood I'm looking for:
- English Walnut
- Cold Hardy Almond
- Honey Crisp Apple
- Plums
- Apricot
- Nectarine
- Peaches

I'm looking for only the types of scion from fruit trees that are NOT patented. So, please don't inquire if what you have to offer is a patented variety. Plant patents acquired before 1995 have a 17 year patent protection. After '95 all plant patents are good for 20 yrs. So, pretty much any plant patented after 1995 can't yet be traded freely.

On the stone fruits, I will trade for pretty much any variety I don't already have - as long as it's reported to do well in zone 6.

I'm especially interested in several, new to me, plum varieties since I don't yet have a single plum tree in my orchard. I'm also looking at doing a nice multi-graft or two of stone fruits.

Also, if you have any of the above mentioned scion but you're not interested in trading, shoot me an email anyway. I may be interested in buying them out-right - if it's one I'd really like to have ;) .

If this sounds interesting to you, please email me at wildfruitnut@gmail.com

Thank you all very much in advance.

-Bill.


Subject: rope lights to heat cuttings Replies: 11
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 711
 
Dave.

At first glance it sounds amazing that citrus can be grown in Canada. To be fair though, Vancouver Island's gardening zone ranges from 9a to 8b.

I'm sure we all could grow citrus with (or without) the help of Christmas lights in zone 9 ;) . 

Subject: rope lights to heat cuttings Replies: 11
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 711
 
Hey greysmith.

How'd I miss you being from KY? Nice to see another Kentuckian here. It's good to know we can grow figs in our parts huh?

I used to live just N of Somerset. Are you near there or on one side or the other? Only so many places you could be in S. Central KY ;) .

BTW, I'm now west of LBL. Not too far from MO.

Subject: Banned members Replies: 112
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 6,432
 
Nicely said Marianna.

Subject: Banned members Replies: 112
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 6,432
 
Sometimes it's better to say nothing at all than to say one word that starts a conflagration. 

A wise person carefully weighs his/her words before they speak.

Life is much simpler when you learn that having an ego is really a detriment to living a peaceful life.

Peace, Love, and Harmony............The "hippies" really were on to something.


It took some thought to come up with any sort of positive contribution here. So thought I'd at least share a few lines of significant importance.

I really don't usually like to add to my 2 cents on topics like the drama referred to here. But really folks (referring to all crowing roosters that were involved), is it really worth the headache and stress just because you want to prove you're right & someone else is wrong? Did you ever consider allowing yourself to be wronged and then just let it go? Come on guys, believe me, life is too short..............

Now. Like Dennis said....How about those figs huh??  And.....read my tag line. 

Subject: Figs in Haiti Replies: 15
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 938
 
Welcome to the forum Chris. You as well Levar.

I lived in Naples, FL for 10 years. The weather patterns of south FL are fairly similar to what you experience in Haiti. With a couple exceptions. Haiti never really cools down much in "winter" and definitely doesn't get any frost. While S. FL will see a rare frost every few years. But the dry sunny winters are typical in S. FL, much like Haiti. As was mentioned, this could be a blessing when growing figs of just about any variety.

Might be worth your effort to just experiment with whatever varieties you can get your hands on.

But you could also get in touch with some folks who have experience at growing figs in an area of FL that's just about as tropical as it gets in the state - the Fruit and Spice Park in Homestead. Apparently they've been growing figs there for awhile now. I'm sure they've built up some experience and that would prove very useful to you. They're much about educating folks on the various tropical fruits and how to grow them. So, I'm sure they'd be happy to help. You may have to be patient though while someone gets back to you. They're usually pretty busy.

I visited there once many years ago. I asked if they would ever share any seeds from the Jackfruit they grow. They said sure. I just had to leave my name & address & they'd send me some seed once the fruit were ripe. Honestly, I didn't think I'd ever hear from them again. But sure enough, a few weeks later, I got some big seeds in the mail. I got one seed to germinate. As far as I know, that tree is still growing in a back yard in Naples Manor.

I doubt the Fruit and Spice Park will be able to send you any plant material. But they should be able to, at least, put you onto some varieties that have done well for them.

Anyway, here's the link to their site: http://www.fruitandspicepark.org/

Hope this helps. 

Subject: UPDATE: Cuttings offer Replies: 32
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 2,330
 
Vinny.

That fig looks like it could be Salce (sal-chay), but it's hard to say for sure without knowing more about where & who it's coming from. Even then, no guarantee.

I've also made another update to the list to reflect some others I just ran out of. 

Subject: UPDATE: Cuttings offer Replies: 32
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 2,330
 
Bumping this because I've updated the list in post #1. Many are gone but I still have a few left of some of the others.

Subject: UPDATE: Cuttings offer Replies: 32
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 2,330
 
Hey Greenfig.

No reply yet doesn't necessarily mean no cuttings just yet. 

However I am out of GM #25, Scott's Yellow, and Strawberry Verte. Updating post #1 to reflect that. 

Subject: Pics of your best pruned tree Replies: 4
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 635
 
Hey Jenny. 

What zone are you in? This will usually determine if you can do single trunk or not. I'd say zone 7 would be about the coldest zone to try the single trunk. Guess it depends on how extensive your protection methods are too though.

In zone 6 I might get by with single trunk for a few years but, almost without doubt, I would eventually get frozen back to the ground. Last winter was one of those killer winters for us.

Having said that, there is much that can be done with fig trees that most other fruit trees may not tolerate. Being new you might not have seen some of these links yet:  

http://figs4funforum.websitetoolbox.com/post/espalier-fig-project-japanese-method-7094805?pid=1284427995#post1284427995

http://figs4funforum.websitetoolbox.com/post/japanesestepover-espalier-orchard-the-adventure-begins-6297347?&trail=50

http://www.hawaiifruit.net/Figs-Japan.htm

http://figs4funforum.websitetoolbox.com/post/japanese-fig-culture-some-links-7128063?pid=1284717700#post1284717700

Tons of great info and plenty of pics too. Should help get you through the winter :~).

Subject: UPDATE: Cuttings offer Replies: 32
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 2,330
 
Hi Jeri.

I'm just trying to keep all the messages I'm receiving in one place. Please send me an email, if you haven't done so already.

Also, I will be doing an update soon. I think most varieties are spoken for at this point.

Subject: Bad experienece with member "fespo" Replies: 22
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 1,125
 
Sorry that happened to you Harvey.

$3.ea is a fair enough price. You could likely do better on eBay but it all depends on how much effort you want to put into it. You may find enough takers here to take them off your hands.

Sorry, I can't use any. Actually have some of that one I need to move myself.

Subject: UPDATE: Cuttings offer Replies: 32
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 2,330
 
Thanks for all the positive comments.

I have about 30 new emails to reply to now. I'll go through them and get back to everyone in order as quickly as possible.

@ Mike. I did get some near fully developed fruit on the GM #25. The fruit came on and held on just fine but they took too long to ripen and they eventually fell (still green) due to the frost. So, it looks like it's going to be a late variety. I'm hoping that, as the tree matures, the fruit will begin to develop earlier. BTW, that was in 2013. It grew a lot but didn't put on any fruit in 2014. Only time will tell on this one. So, for anyone who gets this one, you will be experimenting along with me. I'm keeping my hopes up for this year.

The Scott's Yellow has only given me one small fruit so far on the young tree. It really wasn't much to offer any evaluation on the fruit character. 

Subject: UPDATE: Cuttings offer Replies: 32
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 2,330
 
Just wanted to make these available in case some of you might be interested. I have several varieties that I'd like to sell cuttings of for $3 a piece. There are just a couple of exceptions at $4 each due to rarity or demand.

Some of these are very limited in quantity. In fact, with a variety or two I may only have 3 or 4 cuttings. These are mostly clippingS from some of my own trees .

LIST HAS BEEN MODIFIED AS OF 1/28/15

Here's the list. In no special order. All are $3 ea:
- Blue Celeste
- Beall
- Hardy Chicago
- Troiano Calabrese

Please email your request only at this email: wildfruitnut@gmail.com

I will probably get bombarded with requests for these and will likely run out of most in the first few requests. For this reason I may also not be able to answer many questions you might have. But I'll try.

Also, please send me your mailing info as early as possible to help expedite the whole process.

I hope you all are able to make some nice trees of your own out of some of these cuttings.

"VICTORIBUS SPOLIA"  ;~)

Thank you.

Subject: Figo Preto Replies: 82
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 3,218
 
Go it Paul. You were just trying to make the tree stand out in the photo better.

It was kind of nice seeing those orange things in those other trees in the background though. I saw a ton of those in Sonoran valley recently too.

Can't imagine what folks use those things for. I've never seen them growing here in KY so they must not be anything special ;) .

Subject: Nazareth fig Replies: 39
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 2,584
 
Hey Bob.

Just want to make a clarification here. It's not Marius & I that have dealings with each other, it's Mario & I (as in "mario" username). Mario is also in KY where I am.

Marius, on the other hand, has a few that I'd still like to have in my own orchard ;).

By the way Marius. I remain impressed at how healthy you keep your trees looking in zone 5. It's a passion isn't it? Good job man.

Subject: Figo Preto Replies: 82
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 3,218
 
Hey Paul.

Great looking Preto tree.

I just got back from the Pheonix (Chandler) area. I spotted many mature fig trees there. You guys & your fig perfect climates just make me sick ;) ! All in fun there. Just jealous really.

What's with the white fabric?

Subject: Napolitana Negra Replies: 20
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 1,910
 
Maybe just a matter of patience then.

Congratulations on your newborn. Raising children is its own special kind of rewarding work ;) .

Subject: Tissue culture Replies: 15
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 730
 
@ Norhayati. Responding to your original question. I have a friend who is a horticulturist here in KY. He's done tissue cultures on various plants but not on figs - yet. He feels certain that he can do it successfully. I intend to put it to him as a challenge ;) . I am also in the process of learning this technique for myself. Hopefully, I will have results to report by end of next growing season.

Subject: Tissue culture Replies: 15
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 730
 
@Jailen.

It's possible, but not likely, that your Wal-Mart fig is a tissue culture. Most large nurseries grow fig trees by vegetative propagation (cuttings). As far as I know, there's no real way of knowing the difference by looking at the plant.

One major plus of plants that are propagated by tissue culture is that they are disease free. That is until they are exposed to other plants that have diseases anyway.

Subject: Napolitana Negra Replies: 20
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 1,910
 
Nice to see you have a couple of possible solutions Mohammed. Hope it works out well.

Who knows, perhaps your situation will change soon and you will have plenty of space for your fig trees.

Subject: Your first name at least... Replies: 52
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 1,702
 
I see nothing wrong with that Frank. Good point.

I don't need to know someone's city really but state and zone is nice to know. I recently looked up the latitude of my location and added it to my signature. Zone tells a lot but lat makes a big difference too.

It's all about plants and us people that grow them right?

Never saw a reason to not put my first name out there. 

Subject: Red Stemmed Seedlings Replies: 15
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 1,120
 
Hey Greg.

Did you ever take any additional pictures of your seedlings?

I've seen/eaten the dried Turkish figs at Wal-Mart. I know others have tried growing them too. I may have to give it a shot. Very interesting stuff.

Subject: From Twigs to Figs in 120 Days: Rich's Propagation Method Replies: 140
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 13,391
 
Oh, I must have missed this important point first read around - You water sparingly while they are in the humid chamber. Then water 2X a day once they are out on the trays - Got it.

It's taken a little time for my mind to warm up to it, but I'm starting to like it a bit more now ;) .

Subject: From Twigs to Figs in 120 Days: Rich's Propagation Method Replies: 140
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 13,391
 
Rich.

Very nice results.

I've been rooting my cuttings in sphagnum moss & then transferring them to a pre-wetted soil mix high in perlite. Been fairly successful with this but it has been a delicate process requiring some delicate balancing and finesse.

I like the straightforwardness and seeming simplicity of what you've outlined here. I have one main question though.

I've never used any hydroponic solutions so I don't know much at all about them. Do you have any theories on how the hydro solution might be conditioning the roots? I'm guessing this has to be a major factor in being able to get away with using so much water through the entire process. Granted, the perlite is the other major contributor since water runs right through it (generally speaking).

I'm asking this because when rooting cuttings with the method I've been using, over watering is the #1 cause of losing the cuttings. Obviously a soil mixture is going to retain more water and be more prone to cause problems if too much water is added. But even when I might get my plants to the point of transferring to some sort of soil mix, if I watered as much as you do at the same point, I'm pretty sure they'd croak (technical term there).

So I'm just positing that there is more going on here than just good draining perlite. I'm guessing that the hydro solution is more of a positive contributor here to the success than it may be getting credit for.

What do you think?

Subject: Confusing Persian Mountain Fig nomenclature Replies: 21
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 3,001
 
@figarone
I've seen this picture before. That tree has some very unique looking leaves on it. I wonder if the leaf stucture would change any if it was in a different climate. Figs do seem to do this a little when grown in hot dry conditions as apposed to growing in a more humid environment.

Someone just needs to hike right up there and get some cuttings so we can find out :) .

Subject: Napolitana Negra Replies: 20
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 1,910
 
Mohammed/

Yes, without at least some exposure to direct sunlight, you may have a hard time of ever getting any properly ripe figs. Is your balcony big enough to take them out to even for a couple of hours sunlight per day? Even if your balcony is in perpetual shade your trees would benefit from the warmth and reflected sunlight - it would still be brighter than the filtered light through the window.

As was mentioned it would be nice if you could get one of your friends to help you tend your trees. Even a small courtyard would make all the difference :) .

Just keep in mind, if you do get the opportunity to give them sunlight now, you will most likely have to acclimate them gradually. If they've been in your bathroom for some time now the leaves would most likely get sunburned if you took them out suddenly and left them for too long.

I hope you get to enjoy some nice figs one day soon.

May your trees fig well and prosper ;). 

Subject: Napolitana Negra Replies: 20
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 1,910
 
I also wanted to add this. Fig trees do love lime. If you have a hard time accessing commercial garden lime, you may have a couple of alternatives in your area. Crushed limestone, crushed sea shells, and Dolomite can serve as good substitutes. I'm thinking crushed shells may be readily available -?

Subject: Napolitana Negra Replies: 20
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 1,910
 
Welcome to the forum Mohammed.

Your fig tree should be able to survive outdoor temperatures in your area. Yes temps as high as 50+ c is very hot but it should survive with proper acclimation and care. I've experienced heat as high as 122F only once in my life in Death valley in the US (highest recorded temp was 134f = 56.6c). That was too much for a pale one like myself. I honestly thought my time had come. So, I know that kind of heat is very intense and can potentially lead to death for us humans if we don't constantly drink water when exposed in that environment.

So, the main concern for your fig tree in the hot, dry, season will be water. If you are able to collect rain water at all, that would be a big plus for you. Especially if your main water source is from desalination plant as Francisco mentioned. Letting chlorinated tap water sit in an open bucket for 24 hrs or so will remove most of the chlorine since chlorine will evaporate in to a gas. De-chlorinated water would be less stressful on your tree. 

If you have difficulty accessing commercial fertilizers, one of your best sources of natural organic material may be chicken manure or similar - just as Francisco indicated. Just use caution especially with chicken manure. If it is un-composted, it can burn your plants just like commercial fertilizers. So use it sparingly unless you have access to well composted manure. Even then, be careful not to over-do it.

Hope this helps.

May you have many delicious figs :~) .

Subject: Italian 258 on ebay Replies: 23
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 1,443
 
James.

Granted, I have to be honest, I posted (#3) before looking in to the eBay person in question here. But it is so common a practice among nurseries and many eBay sellers to sell cuttings on a name alone. I tend to expect the worst right off the bat. This is why so many folks here encourage others to only buy off eBay if you know who the seller is.

For example. If you know they're a forum member with a good reputation, then they likely are selling what's described. I pretty much don't trust anyone else until I've, at least, searched them out a bit.

I know first hand that many nurseries won't try to sell a fig tree unless it's labeled "Brown Turkey" or Hardy Chicago". This is only because most northern buyers know little to nothing about fig trees. Most of what they know is based on a couple of pictures they once saw in a seed catalog. Most of these invariably feature BT or HC.

So it's not a stretch to see someone on eBay try to dupe those of us who might be a little more informed on different varieties.

Just my take on things............

Subject: Italian 258 on ebay Replies: 23
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 1,443
 
@ Frank.

I guess it's possible that it is an under-ripe I-258. But still, an experienced fig person wouldn't post a pic of an un-ripe fig on an add meant to help make a sale. I wouldn't anyway. At least not without clearly saying so. 

Subject: Italian 258 on ebay Replies: 23
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 1,443
 
Hey Don.

I haven't seen the fruit first hand on this one yet. But, according to all the post I've seen about it, it doesn't look like the one pictured there on ebay. Likely more folks just trying to make a buck based on a variety they've seen sell well on ebay.

Reading up on the attributes of figs are much easier than gaining actual results on one's own. I guess the picture doesn't really matter as long as they can make a sale.

Personally, I'd rather have the truth in writing with no pic than a complete fallacy as seen in that add.

Here are a couple threads on the real I-258:

http://figs4funforum.websitetoolbox.com/post/italian-258-7040399?pid=1283950001#post1283950001

http://figs4funforum.websitetoolbox.com/post/italian-258-pics-4906546?pid=1280010569#post1280010569

http://figs4funforum.websitetoolbox.com/post/italian-258-ital258-late-fruits-ripe-pix-7169159?pid=1285077498#post1285077498

Subject: Grafting question Replies: 15
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 900
 
@John.
I've never used the beeswax but I think it may be a better choice because it seems to be more "sticky" and that stickiness seems to make it more pliable. Paraffin wax does solidify to a more brittle state on the other hand.

I've used toilet bowl wax to seal grafts though with good success. It's is also a softer, more pliable wax that doesn't set up as hard as paraffin. I've also used clay from the ground with good success. Main drawback with clay is the rain will wash it away and you'll need to re-apply it.

I've always thought that something like Durham's Rock Hard Water Putty would work great but I haven't tried it yet. Just might do so this year. I think you can still get it at Lowes or similar.

@Gloria.
Once you get a few to take you'll be hooked. There's just something very fulfilling and satisfying about grafting ;) .

Subject: Jon's unknown pastiliere pics? Replies: 11
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 753
 
Yeah, rub it in Igor :) .

Subject: Jon's unknown pastiliere pics? Replies: 11
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 753
 
Kristian.

My "Jon's Unknown Pastillere" started figs for three years in a row but the figs always dropped. For this reason I am eliminating it from my orchard this year. I'm in zone 6b (no fig wasp).

Subject: Grafting question Replies: 15
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 900
 
Swizzle.

Be sure to let us know how it works out. Taking and sharing some pictures of the grafts you would be nice to see too ;) .
 

Subject: What Kind of Camera do You Use? Replies: 55
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 1,876
 
Wayne.
So far I like it pretty well. Still figuring it out but I think the pic quality is going to outdo anything else I have right now. My tablet is not bad either though.

Very nice shot of the Bald Eagle.

I don't see too many of those around here. They were a more common sight in S. FL.

Aaron.
When I decide to go with a more serious camera, it will most likely be a Nikon with a good lens or two.  

Pino.
The macro shots are something I really look forward to doing more of also.

Otmani.
That is a really nice image and an awesome looking fig! What's the variety?

Subject: What Kind of Camera do You Use? Replies: 55
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 1,876
 
I thought this might be a nice thread to bump, especially for this time of year. It's always nice to see pictures of growing things in the winter. So don't forget to include some pictures you've taken with your favorite camera :-) .

Hopefully I will have better pictures to share this summer. I just bought a used Sony Cyber-Shot DSC-H5. I think it was a pretty good deal for $60. Seems to function just fine. Now I just have to get used to using it. 

Subject: Grafting question Replies: 15
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 900
 
Hey Swizzle.

This is my kind of thread. I really enjoy grafting.

I found when grafting figs, you can begin doing so anytime after the last forecasted frost of spring for your area. This is just a good rule of thumb because you don't want any new growth being exposed to late frosts. I usually keep a close eye on the 7-10 day forecast to help me determine when would be best for me to start my first grafts.

I prefer not to start any grafts until spring (as apposed to indoors). Just because it's so much easier to let nature do the work for you. 

I've done cleft, saddle, and bark/rind grafts right up into the early part of June. As long as you're seeing good growth in the rootstock you may be able to graft figs just about anytime up through June.

The main thing you have to worry about as summer approaches is the tender scion & new growth getting scorched by the sun. I've had this happen. For this reason I usually plant grafted trees in pots & then place them under a shade tree for a few weeks. Once they've hardened off a bit, then you can move into a sunny location if you want.

There are many great videos on youtube demonstrating a variety of graft types and procedures. I recommend you take the time to watch as many as you have patience for ;-) .

Hope this helps.

~Bill. 

Subject: Fun Thing to do while figs are dormant Replies: 49
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 1,233
 
Very funny stuff Dennis.

My first thought was, why don't you just pour a few trails of salt around the garage to get rid of them? Then it occurred to me - that would just take the fun out of it wouldn't it?

Should get your wife to take a picture of you holding up the trophy slug you just killed after a rigorous hunt in the field ;-) . 

Subject: 1st year cuttings anyone got pics Replies: 36
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 1,469
 
That's great JC.

Maybe you could share some pictures of your fig trees and their progress sometime? If you're anything like most young folks today, I know you don't have a problem handling tech.

We all enjoy seeing pics of what others are growing. 

Subject: 1st year cuttings anyone got pics Replies: 36
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 1,469
 
Hey JC. I'm just now noticing this thread. Welcome to the forum.

Glad to see a younger person interested in cultivating figs. I've been trying to get my 9 yr old to adopt one of my trees as his own. It's a work in progress ;).

Keep posting. Don't worry about some negativity that you might experience. People are just cautious and suspicious - unfortunately, it's often for good reason.

Subject: Single node cuttings experiment Replies: 256
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 12,823
 
Charlie. Nice thread. I experimented a few seasons ago with a bunch of one-noders. I was new and it didn't go so well :-/ . I had a bunch take offwell but fizzled quickly. I"m not very good at keeping good records over any length of time. I get bored too quickly. Looks like you're off to a much better start.

Have to agree with you on your suggestion on cutting diameter. In my opinion, larger diameter cuttings will have more energy reserves to draw from.

Great experiment. Keep us posted.

 

Subject: Dall'osso resemblance. Replies: 10
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 687
 
Interesting looking fig Bass. Unknowns are truly like that proverbial box of chocolates. You just never know......... ;)

Subject: Baud's Sucrette Cutting For Trade Replies: 5
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 680
 
@ greenfig. Yes, I do still have a bunch of cuttings available. I just haven't bumped it because I'm still trying to catch up :-}. I will update it and bump it soon though. If you want you can do a search for it and send me your request - that is if you haven't already.....

Subject: Baud's Sucrette Cutting For Trade Replies: 5
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 680
 
Thanks Calvin. Looks like I may have something worked out. Bunch of good folks here on the forum.

Subject: Another unknown, small black fig Replies: 163
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 10,090
 
Hey Vasile. That's good to know. Negretta is a good lookin little fig then isn't it. 
Thanks for your evaluation.

Subject: Baud's Sucrette Cutting For Trade Replies: 5
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 680
 
I have one genuine Baud's Sucrette cutting available to trade. The number one variety I want to trade for at this time is Maltese Beauty (GM 155).

One cutting is truly all I have. It's about 7" long & about the diameter of a pencil. The real deal.

EDIT: email only please.

Subject: Another unknown, small black fig Replies: 163
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 10,090
 
You've done it now Frank ;) . 

I'm still curious about this little fig too. It sure brought a lot of attention to Jason's table back when he first posted about it.

I know Jason is a very busy dad now but maybe one day he'll surprise us all and dump an arm load of cuttings on us. Well, we can dream anyway.

Not really dropping a hint Jason - just having fun. Hope all is well with you & your family. 

 

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