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Subject: Fig Pictures 2013 Replies: 40
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 2,810
 
Ooooohhh....  Now I follow :-) .

Why not George. Both are sweet and beautiful, right?   But only one of them has the ability to grow up and break hearts - lol!

Subject: OT: blueberries Replies: 83
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 3,140
 

I'm so glad this thread has been started. Thanks Pete ;).

I've learned so far that "blueboy1977" is a bit of a blueberry growing guru IMO. It would be an oversight on my part though if I didn't mention that he told me that he learned much of what he knows from WillsC. I've gotten a few tips from him as well. So, it would seem, that we might learn much if we pay attention to what those two guys have to say (for starters) :-) . Obviously there are others of you that have been growing them for awhile too - credit where credit is due ;).

Gina, I appreciate the point you made about not buying from the local big box stores. Granted you may get something from them and be happy with it but I think I'm still going to go with that local (mail order) company in my own state (see link in post #6). I figure they've been growing blues in this state for many years and they should know the best varieties to try in my area. BTW the plants they ship are 2 yrs old and range in size from 10-20".   EDIT: Buy 12 of their choice and the plants are only $6.25 each. Sounds to me like it'd be worth giving them a try. 

I found a ton of useful information in this document done by UK Coop Extension - College of Ag. Obviously the info will be useful no matter where you live. There's also a pdf link, that contains photos, at the upper left of the page :  http://www2.ca.uky.edu/agc/pubs/ho/ho60/ho60.htm

Now I'm gettin' excited about growing blueberries. C'mon spring!


 


Subject: Fig Pictures 2013 Replies: 40
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 2,810
 
I thought it was GM #175.  Milena? I don't follow  - ??  Otherwise, I think it's a popular Slavic name :) .

Subject: OT: blueberries Replies: 83
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 3,140
 
Great minds must think alike Pete. I had just been talking privately with a couple other members about this very subject. I'm planning to add a few to my yard this year.

I found this great company practically in my own back yard. They sell 10-20" plants at very reasonable prices with quantity discounts. They apparently offer many varieties that cover zones 3-10.  Here, take a gander: http://www.blueberrycroft.com/cms/home

Subject: Fig Pictures 2013 Replies: 40
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 2,810
 
No problem George. It's interesting that you mention that the mother tree seemed to be "ground-hugging". I wonder if this is going to be a characteristic of the variety? I ask this because my little tree seems to be growing out in two directions sort of parallel to the ground (so far anyway). Made me think of how it might make a nice espalier growing like that.

It's also good to know that the momma tree is productive. I hope this proves true in our orchards as well. As you can see from the picture, mine did have quite a few fruit on it for its first year producing. Too bad most of them didn't have time to ripen though. Obviously caprification is not required though because a couple of them did get ripe enough to sample. Can't say the flavor stood out to me though. It is still a young tree.....

I'm glad to hear you have one still going too George. Maybe you should move it up the priority ladder a little. She seems like she may turn out to be a special one - I have high hopes for her anyway ;) .

Hopefully some of those other folks have secured this one in their collection also. Maybe I could start a separate thread just to ask who has it growing?  

Subject: Fig Pictures 2013 Replies: 40
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 2,810
 
George,
Thank you for posting those beautiful pictures. Nice to see what it might have in store for me. Those pics are just what we all need to see right now considering the cold winter we've had :-) ! Not to be greedy, but do you have any shots of the parent tree? 

I hope I get to see some more fruits on this one this summer. I know it's a bit early to say yet, but it seems to hint at being a very productive variety (hoping anyway). On my small tree, the fruit seemed to take a long time to ripen though. Could be due to it being a young tree or could be that it's going to be a late variety - or both - or neither (just too young to say right now). I'm hoping a little TLC will help it to get an earlier start this year. It's buried under a thick layer of mulch right now. 

Ed,
Aside from what you see in the pictures above and what I've just said about it, you may not find much more on this one yet. Guess it depends on whether George sent cuttings to other folks of this one. Also depends on if they succeeded at growing it or not. If I recall correctly, I didn't even get this one directly from George. Someone else had rec'd some of George's GM varieties and we ended up doing some swaps for varieties we each hadn't gotten yet = equitable trade ;) . All said & done I still only succeeded with 3 varieties out of all of them :( . Hopefully I'll have more to report later this year on the other two.

Subject: Fig Pictures 2013 Replies: 40
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 2,810
 
You're welcome Martin. It's nice looking at pictures this time of year from when the weather was warmer :) .

I have a bunch more pictures somewhere but I'm having a hard time tracking them down. Too many pics on file. Need to weed through & delete a bunch :-}.



Subject: Fig Pictures 2013 Replies: 40
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 2,810
 
Good to hear it Micheal. I need to give mine more attention this year. I'd like to see some better growth on mine & a few more figs would be nice ;) .

Rick,
90% or more of the grafts I've done have been the cleft graft. It seems to be one of the simplest grafts & I've had very good success with it. The one I've tried second most had been the T-bud. I've had far more failures with that one which, by default, has had me going back to my "old reliable" cleft graft more often than not.

I've also done some saddle grafting with good results. In fact, I like the saddle graft better and I feel it makes an even better union than the cleft. It just feels a little more cumbersome to perform for me so , again, I fall back on the cleft.

I've relied on grafting mostly where I have very limited material of something I view as rare or special to me. My most successful saddle graft would have to be, hands down, this graft I did of one of gorgi's GM #175.

Here's a pic of GM #175 producing for the first time this past Sept. I'm sure I took pics of the ripe fruit but I'm not finding them at the moment:

GM 175.jpg 






Subject: Fig Pictures 2013 Replies: 40
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 2,810
 
Thanks Danny. I've learned from most folks here that you can never be sure what you've got when you buy fig trees from the "big box" stores. I picked up two of them at the time just because they were such large tree for the price. Most were multi-trunk and about 3-5' for $20 each. Couldn't resist.

The BT above has the Sicilian Black grafted to one side. If it survives the winter I will air-layer it in May & get it going on it's own roots.

The Sicilian Black tasted far better than the BT by the way :). If BT was the only fig a person had and didn't know there were some out there that are so much better, then that would make BT the best fig they ever tasted! I'm so glad that I've seen the light :-))).

Subject: Fig Pictures 2013 Replies: 40
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 2,810
 
Pete,
Paradiso Nero IS Acciano. Mario mistakenly started out calling Acciano, "Paradiso Nero". When he visited his family in Italy last summer, apparently, they were quick to set him straight on this fact. Therefore the name Paradiso Nero doesn't apply to any fig Mario has. It was erroneous from the start.

Andy,
Even though it may be slow to get established, it should respond well to fert & lime. So, if you feel yours could take a little fertilizer this spring, then I'd say go for it. Just don't over-do it of course. 

Subject: Fig Pictures 2013 Replies: 40
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 2,810
 
Armando. 
Just to clarify. That fig noted as Paradiso Nero is actually Acciano. Early on, Acciano was mislabeled as Paradiso Nero.

Subject: Fig Pictures 2013 Replies: 40
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 2,810
 
Hey Dale. It's the least I can do for Jon ;) .

Andy. The only pics of Haikel that would be worth a darn would be of the larger parent trees that aren't growing on my property. I didn't get the chance to take any pics last summer though. Haikel seems to be a slow grower early on and my little tree gets chopped on so much I doubt it will ever get very big. I just can't resist sharing cuttings when I have them. So nothing new or special on it right now.

I'm hoping this summer I'll get the chance to go by the Doctor's office I know of that has a large Haikel behind their practice. I offered them some tips on care and that tree seems to have responded very well to a little fertilizer, lime, and mulch. If we weren't having such a cold winter this year, I would have expected that tree to have an exceptionally abundant Breba crop this spring. It was covered with so many small lateral branches this fall I'm sure the breba crop would have been nice. Just not so sure now because of the extra low temps we've had for so long this winter. Hopefully I'll get surprised. We'll see.

Subject: Pan-roasted Quail with Black Fig/Bacon Demi-glace over Piccolo Farrotto Replies: 5
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 494
 
Dang! Now I'm gonna have to go quail hunting this spring :-) !

Subject: Fig Pictures 2013 Replies: 40
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 2,810
 
Here are some of Mario's figs with MBVS on the plate for comparison:


Attached Images
jpeg Mixed_Figs_9-1-13.jpg (658.46 KB, 185 views)
jpeg Cut_Figs_2013.jpg (873.36 KB, 164 views)


Subject: Fig Pictures 2013 Replies: 40
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 2,810
 
Got it. Here are the rest of the Sicilian Black pictures:


Attached Images
jpeg Sicilian_Black_3.jpg (614.40 KB, 61 views)
jpeg Sicilian_Black.jpg (775.13 KB, 81 views)
jpeg Sicilian_Black_2.jpg (606.94 KB, 84 views)
jpeg Sicilian_Black_4.jpg (802.03 KB, 77 views)


Subject: Fig Pictures 2013 Replies: 40
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 2,810
 
Seem to be having trouble posting more than one pic per post. Any suggestions?

Here's another shot of my Sicilian Black:

Sicilian Black (9-8-13) 2.jpg 


Subject: Fig Pictures 2013 Replies: 40
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 2,810
 
No problem at all Pete. It's all about sharing - especially the pictures ;) .

Subject: Fig Pictures 2013 Replies: 40
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 2,810
 
Here are some pics of Sicilian Black. Can't recall who I got this one from at the moment. I may have it recorded somewhere but not sure where. Would have to do some searching around to retrieve that bit of info. 

I do recall this be a very good fig though. Will have to give it some more attention this year so I can sample some more fruit :) .

Sicilian Black 2013.jpg 


Subject: Fig Pictures 2013 Replies: 40
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 2,810
 
This is Bakio. An unknown variety that originates from Spain. I had taken more pictures of this one but this is really the only picture that came out clear enough to tell anything about it:

Bakio 2013.jpg


Subject: Fig Pictures 2013 Replies: 40
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 2,810
 
This one is called Baskinta Purple. Flavor wasn't real memorable but this is its first year producing:

Baskinta Purple (9-8-13).jpg 


Subject: Fig Pictures 2013 Replies: 40
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 2,810
 
Just wanted to share a few random pictures of some of my figs from last summer.

First up is a picture of a Brown Turkey I bought from Tractor Supply a couple seasons ago:

BT from TS.jpg 


Subject: OT Double Trouble Replies: 78
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 2,303
 
Sweet pair of precious little beauties.

They will be eating grandpas figs before you know it!

Congratulations to you and all your family George!

Subject: Mario's Cuttings/For Those Who Missed Out. Replies: 16
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 1,670
 

You're welcome everyone.

Still a few left of the ones mentioned in post #1. 

All out of Acciano & HC.


Subject: Have you heard of these varieties? Replies: 13
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 869
 
Who knows what any of them really are -including the one labeled Galbun. Sounds like someone had no idea what the varieties where so they made up some labels and stuck them on the plants.

If you'd really like to find out more about what varieties they are, buy one of each. Grow them to fruiting size & post some pics & info on here. You still may not find out exactly what they are but at least you will learn a lot more about them.

Who knows, maybe some of them will be fairly easy to ID from their fruit. Or maybe they all turn out to be the same variety. Or possibly some of them are varieties never even heard of before. With most large wholesale nurseries, you'll just never know unless you grow them out to see for yourself.

Nothing ventured, nothing gained.............. 

Subject: starting figs for sale? Replies: 25
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 1,760
 
It's not a bad idea. Especially if you plan to already be selling produce at the farmers mkt anyway. It's worth a try. 

Aaron hit the nail on the head as to which varieties to offer. They are all three cold hardy enough to make it through most winters in your zone. Makes for decent enough variety for folks to choose from as well.  

Subject: two method of water control i haven't heard about in awhile. Replies: 16
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 835
 
Can't argue with the results now can ya Pete?

This just occurred to me! I now know what method is the absolute, hands down, best rooting method of all time!! 

Are you ready for it?  ----  

It's the one method that happens to work best for you whoever you are :-) !!    

Uh-huh. I am a genius after all...........can I get a maybe? How about eccentric sociopath? Anyone?

Subject: The Fruit Hunters Replies: 11
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 811
 
Excellent full length documentary!! I'm only about halfway through it but I felt like I was in a fruit nut's group therapy. It's great to see so many people who are so passionate about fruit and fruit growing -just like us :-) !

I was very surprised to see someone I know in the documentary. No, not the actor fella. Early on in the show there was some footage about the International Fruit Growers Meet in Homestead, FL. At one of the fruit tasting tables there was this one skinny fellow with white hair. His name is David Burd. He was practically my neighbor when I lived in Naples, FL. I've bought fruit trees from him and even had the privilege of touring his back yard tropical fruit wonder land. Very cool stuff!

It's amazing the variety of tropical fruit that can be grown in S. FL. That's the #1 thing I miss about living there. Still not enough to outweigh the things I hated about living there though.

Anyway, I love this documentary. It's just the kind of program I'm sure I could watch several times over. I can't say that about more than a handful of things I've ever watched. Looking forward to watching the rest of it.

If you like fruit in the least, I highly recommend it.

Thanks for starting this thread Frank. It may have been a long time before I saw this otherwise.

Subject: two method of water control i haven't heard about in awhile. Replies: 16
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 835
 
Oohhh.........  What you were saying wasn't "gelling" for me at first. Seems I'm a little slow on the uptake aren't I?
Now the gears are re-aligning. Sounds like what you're saying will work. Let me see what I can do with that knowledge now............  

Thank you for your patience Pete.  I'm sure I was supposed to be a genius but I think too many brain cells got damaged in my younger days to qualify at my current stage in life. That's my official cover story.....and yes.....I'm sticking to it ;) . 

Subject: two method of water control i haven't heard about in awhile. Replies: 16
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 835
 
OK Pete S. Since I'd rather not lose the cuttings I've started with the SIPs, looks like I better go back & pour the water out of the reservoirs. I'll just leave them after that to see if they'll find a balance in time. It's good to know that we have more flexibility on the mix recipes when using the fabric wicks. Makes sense since the fabric is doing the wicking instead of the peat based mix itself.

When using peat pots like this, the fabric only needs to wick as far as the bottom of the peat pot. After that the peat pot itself takes over and the entire pot becomes damp in little time at all.

Doug.  Thanks for the additional comments & info. So, we're basically starting cuttings in the typical fashion & the SIP reservoir is there as a convenience for when the roots are ready to utilize that sort of moisture uptake?

I was really hoping we were going to be able to "stick & forget" (sort of) our cuttings using the SIPs. Would have been a nice convenience anyway.

When I first saw some of you guys talking about this, my first thought was that the cuttings would get too wet & rot. Later I got to thinking about how nice it would be if it actually worked. I guess my initial skepticism was warranted.  Still, it works absolute wonders on established plants or for starting seeds!

Any other thoughts? 

Subject: two method of water control i haven't heard about in awhile. Replies: 16
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 835
 
So,  you guys are saying that the SIPs (used in the typical manner) are no good for starting cuttings? 

But you're still using the SIP container themselves with good results (Pete S.)? I'm sure you've talked about this in some of you're other posts but I haven't read them all.

I'm just trying to clarify whether anyone has had success using the SIPs, in the typical fashion, on cuttings. Did anyone see it through until you had failures or successes?

I'm currently experimenting with some cuttings in SIPs using 5" peat pots and those 32oz food storage containers. I'm also using the 32oz containers set into the bottom section of 2 liter soda bottles. Am I doomed to failure or are we all going to be surprised? I don't know yet. Any input will be appreciated.

Sorry Pete K. if I'm hijacking your thread. Just looking for some positive input ;-) . 

I really like the SIP system because of the lower maintenance as well as the outstanding growth results usually experienced when using them. If it works on cuttings, I can see many time saving benefits as well great benefits to the growth & health of our little trees.

Subject: Tips on super heating that greenhouse? Replies: 16
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 1,067
 
Rick's suggestion of a manure base hotbed is also a good idea for any greenhouse. Heat is generated from the decomposing organic material and you're making compost to boot. Only drawback is it does require a little extra space which is usually at a premium in a GH.

Ron, How many days of sun would you say you average in the summer? One nice advantage for you is the fact that you get much longer days in summer than we do further south. Some folks in AK are known to grow some really huge vegetables because of the many hours of summer sunlight they tend to get.

It will be interesting to hear back from you over the next couple seasons to see what kind of results you get. 
 

Subject: Tips on super heating that greenhouse? Replies: 16
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 1,067
 
The first thing you should do is move to S. California -lol . But since that may be the least practical..........

The rocket stove is a very good idea. If you can build one that burns as efficiently as is claimed, that may be a good alternative for you. Also, depending on the size of your GH those candle heater pots could be an inexpensive route to go as well. Especially if you can find (or order) some of those long burning emergency candles: http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=candle%20heater%20pots&sm=1

I wish you the best but, figs in Newfoundland, really ;) ? It will be interesting to hear about the results you experience there. Please keep us posted........... 

Subject: Mario's Cuttings/For Those Who Missed Out. Replies: 16
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 1,670
 
Looks like Pete's got it on the Acciano. From what I understand, when you see two "C's" together in Italian, they are always pronounced like "ch".

As far as Atreano goes? I think it is acceptably pronounced two ways - (Ah-tree-ah-no) or (A-tree-ah-no) with the "A" being a long "A" in the latter. Mario pronounces it as shown in the former above.

Subject: PIX: Maltese Beauty cutting progress. Replies: 17
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 1,015
 

Wow Pete. She's looking really good. About time to pot it up huh? Please keep us posted.

I love that watermark btw. I have now idea about how to put a watermark in my pictures. Where do I start on something like that?


Subject: Mario's Cuttings/For Those Who Missed Out. Replies: 16
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 1,670
 
Thought I'd add some links to pictures of Mario's figs to this thread.

Here is Acciano (aka Paradiso Nero): 
http://figs4funforum.websitetoolbox.com/post/ky-figs-4794596

http://figs4funforum.websitetoolbox.com/post/ky-figs-ready-to-eat-4802085


Salce (sawl-chay):
http://figs4funforum.websitetoolbox.com/post/salce-fig-pictures-5947309


Troiano Calabrese:
http://figs4funforum.websitetoolbox.com/post/atreano-figs-ready-to-eat-5442757

http://figs4funforum.websitetoolbox.com/post/identify-these-figs-5437598


Hope this helps for some who had inquired about these varieties. Hopefully Mario or myself will be able to add some more pictures and info on these as time goes on. Maybe even by the end of this summer ;) .




Subject: Swollen lenticels? Do I need to remove? Replies: 9
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 802
 
Much has been theorized by several members as to the what & why cuttings often do this. The answer? I dunno.  

In my experience though, there is no reason to remove it. Just let the cutting keep doing its thing ;) . 

That looks suspiciously like my writing on that Salce cutting :-J .

Subject: Slugs -- what are they good for? Replies: 25
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 977
 
Dennis. I was going to suggest the salt perimeter but looks like that has been covered. It does work. I'd never heard of the copper idea though. Guess it depends on which one you want to go with. Salt is the cheaper of the two though. You can get a really big bag of "pool salt" for pretty cheap. Just my 2c.

Subject: Fig research Replies: 34
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 1,838
 
louborges. I think most back yard orchardists would frown upon GM figs. It's not so much that there would be something wrong with the fruit. But it's that whoever develops a GM fig, would be the one in control of making it available. Large corporations already have way too much control over crops that are grown. We need to be moving away from this massively self-destructive trend. Not further into it - IMO.

Selectively cross-breeding on the other hand is not such a bad idea. Genetics are often strengthened when crosses of this nature are done. The term "hybrid vigor" comes to mind.

As Pete said though. You need to start with a caprifig for male pollination. I would assume a lot could be learned if you took the time to see if you could dig up any research papers done by the late great LSU fig breeding program.  

Subject: --- Really cheap plant tags Replies: 37
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 1,589
 
Pete, your suggestion might be a little impractical. I think humor was you aim though. You succeeded - IMO. LOL!

Hey Danny. I've used the old blinds extensively. Surprisingly, one of those paint markers works even better on them than a sharpie marker. Those 2" wide plastic blinds are even better. They're thicker & seem like they would last a long time. I was salvaging the end pieces of some of those recently when my wife put new blinds in our dining room. Up-cycling at its best :) . 

Subject: It's been a while - Is there any hope? Replies: 23
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 1,290
 
Hi JoAnn.

"Storing" cuttings for a year or more is something I have plenty of experience at! When you get the chance to take them out of the fridge for examination, this will tell you a lot about the state they're in. If they weren't stored with damp paper of any kind around them (damp paper makes them decompose faster) , and they haven't rotted away yet, you should at least give them a try.

I had recently posted in a thread on some Italian Honey cuttings that I'd had in my fridge since 2009. I got some of them to root for me last winter (can't find that thread right now). It's actually a long-term experiment I have going to test storing cuttings for long periods of time. I still have a few of those cuttings in my fridge. I'll take out a couple of them this year to see if they have any viability left in them.

So, many of your cuttings should still be alright. Certainly wouldn't hurt to pull them out and treat them as if they are fresh cuttings taken today. I wish you the best on them & may you make many nice little fig trees out of them ;-) .

If you need any new cuttings just let us know. I'm sure many of us would be happy to help you out, including myself.

Subject: Some Figs ive tasted so far this summer,in Austraila Replies: 16
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 912
 
Mocatta.

It's nice to see the success that other folks are having in different parts of the world. What are your winters like in the Sydney area?

Subject: Ficus Carica list-- How many figs do you have? Replies: 28
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 1,561
 
So Grasa, you're suggesting a fig party at Dennis' house this summer? Man! That sure is nice of you Dennis!

Oh wait, maybe we should ask Dennis first ;-)...

Subject: Ficus Carica list-- How many figs do you have? Replies: 28
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 1,561
 
I confirm that I have two of those listed. But I guess it really depends on how many of those actually go by a different name by which they may commonly be called here in the US.

Subject: Unique fig formation Replies: 10
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 1,009
 
Hey Bass. I've seen a fair number of fruits that look like this from the parent trees of that Haikel (poss. Brunswick) fig.

Nice picture Bass, as usual :) .

Subject: peach flavor figs. Replies: 56
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 2,417
 

Hey Pete. I've always felt that this Haikel Lebanese has a bit of a peach tasting "finish". Granted not every fruit off the same tree tastes that way. It seems like the ones that are closes to being perfectly ripe display this flavor the most. 

An added note here is important. This Haikel may very well be a Brunswick variant. I just can't say for sure yet because I haven't grown any other Brunswicks to maturity yet.

However, I do have one other unknown variety that produced Brunswick looking fruit for me this year. It comes from an elderly lady who says her son in TN gave it to her years ago. It seems to grow more vigorously than the Haikel and it remains to be seen whether or not it has a similar cold-hardiness as the Haikel.

At any rate, the Haikel does have a bit of a peachy flavor. A very good tasting fig IMO. BTW I don't have any cuttings or trees available of Haikel at this time. 


Subject: Mario's Cuttings/For Those Who Missed Out. Replies: 16
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 1,670
 
I am getting everyone's emails. I will get back to you over the next day or so.

Thank you.

Subject: Mario's Cuttings/For Those Who Missed Out. Replies: 16
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 1,670
 
If anyone missed getting some of these cuttings, I still have quite a few nice pieces left. I've added some links to pictures for those of you who haven't seen these varieties yet (see post #9).

- Dottato
- Salce
- Troiano Calabrese

- Italian Honey

The cost for the first 3 varieties is still $3 each.

Italian Honey is just $2 each.

Most shipping charges have been about $3 or $4.

If interested, shoot me an email:  wildfruitnut@yahoo.com

Thanks!



Subject: where is the fig heaven in US? Replies: 32
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 1,117
 
Pete.
Stay where you are, build a big enough greenhouse, mail-order figs wasps. Your very own little paradise. It could work..........

This part of KY is one of the cheapest places to buy/own/rent property. Used cars are the cheapest I've seen anywhere. Generally, overall low cost of living here. Just have to "build" your own piece of paradise in the back yard. That's my plan anyway :-)) . 

Subject: How can I fix this one year old tree? Replies: 20
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 926
 
If you want it to grow as a single trunk tree I'd go with what Vito said. Re-pot into larger pot planting everything below the soil line except for the one main trunk you want to grow straight. The point is, of course, to angle the lower portion so that one main trunk is oriented straight up. Then, you might also want to prune off the lower stuff down to the one trunk you want to grow. 

Just one suggestion. But that's how I'd do it. Simple & effective. Right Vito?

Subject: And so it begins... Replies: 66
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 3,979
 
@ Ed. I'm fairly certain that the picture above represents only a small fraction of the total cuttings that Jon will have available by the time his list comes out. In fact, the number you have above is close to the number of varieties that Jon has access to.
Below is a quote from Encanto Farms welcome page :-) :

"Our collection currently includes about 100 banana varieties and about 1100 fig varieties." 

Now there's a number for you to do some estimating with Ed :-0 !  Yeah, Jon has his work cut out for him in a big way.   But I'm sure you're use to it right Jon ;) ?

 

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