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Subject: And so it begins... Replies: 66
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 3,979
 
Jon, I can imagine. That stuff gets really sticky. I got it all over our dining room table one time. The wife wasn't too happy about it. I have my own table to work from now ;-)) .

BTW, all that juicyness just means the cuttings are oozing with life :) .

Subject: Rooting Method you will be Wowing about... Replies: 20
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 1,290
 
Very interesting Grasa.

@ Aaron. I'm doing something very similar to what you're suggesting. In fact it's crossed my mind to do exactly what you're saying with some of the others I have left.

What I've done is dip some cuttings in Clonex, stick them in the peat cubes, and then placed them in covered bins with damp newspaper in the bottom. So far, so good. Only issue Ive seen so far has been a little mold trying to start where a cutting tip or two has been laying against the wall of the container. I just pick them up wipe the bit of mold away, air out the container & place them back in. No real issues though. Too early for roots either though.

Sorry Grasa, didn't mean to hijack your thread.

Subject: Yard Sale Jackpot Replies: 29
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 1,765
 
Good job Addison. I look forward to seeing more about this one later in the year ;) .

It's nice to think about the possibility of some great "new" figs that might still be in our neighbors own back yards.............. 

Subject: Fig lizard ! Replies: 8
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 717
 
Jack. Yeah, he sure is cute in eating that fig. Not quite as cute when they're about 5' long though. Granted, a very impressive animal no doubt.
I'm sure a big one would eat a whole pile of figs!

Subject: And so it begins... Replies: 66
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 3,979
 
Ahhhh. The sweet smell of fresh cut fig wood. Nothin' quite like it.


Now the real fun begins for you Jon :-) !  May it go well for you.

Subject: Yard Sale Jackpot Replies: 29
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 1,765
 
So Addison, did you get good air layers from all three varieties?  I hadn't seen this thread when it was originally started.

You may very well have some special Greek heirlooms on your hands there. I hope you get some nice fruit on all of them this summer. So we can see pics of course ;-) .

No doubt - good find.

Subject: Cuttings from Encanto Farms Replies: 11
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 842
 
Good one Bob. I'm pretty sure orders will be taken in order of forum join date this year ;) .  All in fun...........

Subject: Cuttings from Encanto Farms Replies: 11
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 842
 
Jon will post his list soon. I would expect sometime early next month. Just watch for the announcement here on the forum.  

Subject: Cuttings Available *Update* 1/14/14 Replies: 28
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 2,067
 
Again, I'm very glad to hear that everyone's cuttings seem to be making it in good shape. I hope you all make some nice trees out of them. These really are some very good varieties.

By the way, I do still have more cuttings for anyone who hasn't had the chance to get some yet. Just send me an email & we'll work out the details: wildfruitnut@yahoo.com.

-Bill. 

Subject: MISSION FIG 5 FT TALL BRANCH SPLITTING OPEN Replies: 47
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 1,260
 
Hey figster.  I'm not sure how cold it has gotten where you are but the damage does look like cracking due to freezing. I know most of the country has experienced some extra cold temps so far this winter. Your tree may do some dying back because of this. If it does, I would just wait to see where any new growth may start growing from before trimming off any dead wood.

If you really want to fill that crack you could use wet clay. If you have a local, natural, source that would work fine. You could also "make" some clay mud by using certain kitty litters. Some of the cheapest, most basic cat litters are 100% clay. Just read the label to make sure before purchasing a bag. Mix some up with water until you get the consistency of modeling clay (or thereabouts). Then just pack it in wherever yo need it. You may have to re-apply it after heavy rains.

I've gotten natural clay just by digging down a foot or so on my own property. I've used it with good results to patch up the top of larger rootstocks (2"+) when grafting persimmons.

Hope this helps.

Subject: Fig Clearence - Lowes - Tampa Bay FL Replies: 4
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 547
 
You could always buy up all they have and re-sell them for 3X's that come spring when they've leafed out. Most any small fig tree is worth $9.99 when it's nice and flushed out.

Just a suggestion. I know that's what I'd do anyway :) . 

Subject: Grafting Replies: 12
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 967
 
I've never tried this method but I like it. I also find it interesting that the scion looks as if it was in the beginning of growth stage.

As was referred to above, I would assume that both the rootstock as well as the scion may both have to be "slipping" for this method to work properly. I say that because of the dimensions of the bud section. It doesn't look as if it was just "cut" away as a bud might be. But instead looks like the bark was cut as well as "peeled" away from the donor tree.

I've always grafted with dormant scion onto rootstock that is actively growing. Usually in the very early stages of new growth in spring. This has worked very well for me. All that energy in the rootstock tends to push new life right into the dormant scion. Quickly waking it up & flushing it into new growth - usually ;) .

Subject: Cuttings Available *Update* 1/14/14 Replies: 28
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 2,067
 
So glad to hear that everyone is receiving their packages in good shape.

Thank you very much for the positive feedback. 

Subject: What the...??? Springtails? Replies: 19
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 1,380
 
Well Grasa and Jim. My post is no longer nearly as humorous now that you've found that info.

What can I say. Good finds. Good info. Cool critter stuff.

I still kind of favor the alien mind control conspiracy though :-} . 

Subject: What the...??? Springtails? Replies: 19
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 1,380
 
Hmmm.........Curious little buggers aren't they. I'm usually pretty good at IDing natural little critters like this. But I'm just not familiar with this one. At first I thought mosquito larvae but both the color as well as their movement doesn't jive with that answer.

Please keep this thread going until someone is able to ID these little critters. Pretty cool little guys IMO. That is unless they're eating your fig roots. Then they're bad little swimmers, bad!

If no one is able to ID them we can always start offering each our own conspiracy theories about government cover up of tiny alien creatures that want to control our minds.  They're real man!! I've seen them on youtube!!!  You get the idea :-) .

  

Subject: Cuttings Available *Update* 1/14/14 Replies: 28
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 2,067
 
I've made an update above ^ .

Subject: Cheap small fig trees on eBay Replies: 20
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 1,619
 
coralgroher: Welcome to the forum. Nice of you to step up and make some clarifications about the trees you're offering on ebay. If I didn't already have the varieties you're offering, I'd give you a shot & order some. Your prices are very fair and that's something I believe in - being fair to others. Keep it up and others will treat you in kind - IMHO. 

Subject: Cuttings Available *Update* 1/14/14 Replies: 28
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 2,067
 
Hey Richard. I think I've got your email in waiting (haven't gotten to you yet). I will get to you, if not this evening, then tomorrow.

Subject: Cuttings Available *Update* 1/14/14 Replies: 28
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 2,067
 
I am all out of the Pied de Beouf now.

greenfig; Definitely make any cuts you want before you root them.

Subject: Cuttings Available *Update* 1/14/14 Replies: 28
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 2,067
 
I'm all out of the Unknown Owensboro fig. For those who requested some of these, I may have rooted cuttings in the fall. 

Subject: Cuttings Available *Update* 1/14/14 Replies: 28
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 2,067
 
Hey Alan.
The O-boro fig may very well be a Sal's EL . I can't say for sure though because I don't have a Sal's to compare it to. So, I can't say one way or the other. I just know it was one of my best tasting figs this year. It made me stop and stare at the tree I just pulled the little fruit from. Very good, rich, sweet, berry-ish flavor. This one is very well worth any efforts to propagate & grow. I would consider it among my top five for flavor - IMO.

I may not be so great at describing flavor and texture but I'll give it a shot. The Acciano has a hint of a "grapey" flavor -to my palate anyway. It is more of a juicy fig. But I definitely would not call it watery because it has plenty of flavor. I really like it and could eat a bowl full of them ;-) .  

Subject: Cuttings Available *Update* 1/14/14 Replies: 28
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 2,067
 
Here is a link to a thread that Jason started on this fig:  http://figs4funforum.websitetoolbox.com/post/unknown-owensboro-6008102?highlight=owensboro 

And some of my own pictures are in this thread in post #23:  http://figs4funforum.websitetoolbox.com/post/picture-thread-6164890?highlight=owensboro

My pictures are of just one fruit that came from my immature tree.

Subject: Cuttings Available *Update* 1/14/14 Replies: 28
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 2,067
 
I've made note next to the ones I'm out of now. I still have cuttings left of all the others. Please email (please don't PM) me if interested.
 

I now have the following cuttings available if anyone is interested. They are all decent size pieces with many being large enough to make 2-3 cuttings out of. The first ones listed are just $2 each to forum members:

> Italian Honey
> Hardy Chicago 
> Algerian - Watts (Out
> Armenian - Watts (Out)
> Pied de Boeuf - Watts (Out)
> Paris Purple - (Out)  (This may be a Celeste type but it's not the same as the Celests I have in my yard. This variety was found growing in Paris, TN where it has grown into two 10' + bushes. It never gets any winter protection and doesn't die back.)
 
With the exception of the Italian Honey, I have very limited quantities of the varieties above. Most will be limited to just 2 pieces per person. First come, first served.

The following varieties are $3 per cutting. The size and quality of these is the same as mentioned above:

> Acciano
> Dottato
> Salce
> Troiano Calabrese
> Unknown Owensboro (Out) - This fig was found growing in Owensboro, KY. It is proving to be a special fig with exceptional flavor. Some of you here can attest to that. ( Only 10 pcs available ).

Many of you have rec'd some of the Italian varieties mentioned above. But I know there may be others who haven't had opportunity to get some yet. I do have plenty of Mario's varieties left (getting low on T. Calabrese though) so anyone is welcome to request them.

If you're interested in any of these please email me. Please don't PM me because the forum PM system fills up too fast. Use this email address: wildfruitnut@yahoo.com 


Man, I'm looking forward to spring! Expecting a low of about 0 tomorrow night. I'm not lovin' it.

Subject: Cuttings coming back from dead. Replies: 9
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 730
 
This method does work but you may not want to try it with a variety you only have a piece or two of.

I've buried cuttings under mulch in the fall or winter & then in the spring go back & pull the mulch back just enough to expose small sections of the cuttings. Leave most of the cutting(s) below the mulch. Seems like a good method in cold climates if you have a lot of one variety to play with. I've produced many viable trees this way. Just be sure to pot them up or protect them before the first frosts come the following fall.

Subject: Pictorial: The 5 Minute Mini SIP Replies: 116
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 7,919
 
Thank you Pete. Haven't read every post so missed that. 

I really like the idea of using these SIPs for rooting cuttings. I'm still having a hard time getting past the thought of the cutting possibly getting too much moisture though. I guess the idea of not allowing the very top to get wet might help though.

Subject: looking for CdDG cuttings. Replies: 16
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 1,185
 
CdD Rimada looks like an interesting one too - a Col De Dame with Panache-like stripes.

Subject: Pictorial: The 5 Minute Mini SIP Replies: 116
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 7,919
 
I may have missed this Pete, but what is the wick material made of? Source?

Subject: Fig grafting Replies: 15
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 927
 
Figs are relatively easy to graft. I've mostly used the cleft and saddle graft with very good success. 

If you have a variety that has been known to be a weak grower, then grafting it onto a more vigorous rootstock may be beneficial. I agree, doing a multiple graft onto one rootstock is a good solution if you have very limited space.

I've heard some express concern that grafting a given fig variety onto a different rootstock can cause changes in the grafted variety. I could see how this might be a concern if you're trying to preserve the uniqueness of a special variety. So far, I haven't experienced any negative changes in the grafted variety to support those concerns. 

If anyone is interested in learning how to graft, this english guy on youtube has a few excellent vids on how to get started. Granted, he grafts mostly apples but the grafting techniques he demonstrates are universal. I learned practically everything I needed to know on how to make successful graft unions from watching his videos.
http://www.youtube.com/user/stephenhayesuk/videos

Subject: Visit with fig breeder Replies: 53
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 2,458
 
Harvey, Yes, those point you made did cross my mind. I guess I'm just trying to grasp why more effort hasn't been put into breeding programs geared toward the mid-west & the NE. Probably because Cali already has the fig market covered..... 

Subject: Visit with fig breeder Replies: 53
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 2,458
 
I would echo the questions in post #'s 6, 8 10, 11, and 12  And then I would add - Who is working on breeding cold hardiness and humidity resistance into new fig varieties. If the answer is no one, then, why? What else would you ask a fig breeder?

In my mind it should only be a matter of time before the general (east coast) public is growing fig trees as hardy and varied as apple trees. Am I asking for too much? It's been done with peaches hasn't it?   

Subject: Pictorial: The 5 Minute Mini SIP Replies: 116
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 7,919
 
Thanks Rafael. Nice tip! I'll go look the stuff up.


Subject: Italian 88 experience? Replies: 19
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 1,246
 
Well, this thread and the other linked info are enough for me to put this one on the back burner. Granted, it may prove worthy during one of our occasional hot, dry summers. But I have far too many other great cuttings to work with over spending my time & effort on one that may or may not be worth a fart.

Sorry I-88. You'll have to take another number and wait in the lobby - figuratively speaking ;} . 

Subject: Pictorial: The 5 Minute Mini SIP Replies: 116
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 7,919
 
Forgot to reply to a couple other folks:

James; Yes, I really like this little set-up. I would call it a successful experiment with positive results ;) . It worked so well I just have to try it for getting some tomatoes started in Feb. Oh, and for fig cuttings too :) . 

Wills; I really like your set-up pictured in post #70. Looks like a real custom job just for the mini-SIPs. I also like how you have the flex straws coming out of the side of the cup instead of straight up. Gives you the option of watering even with a cover on the cup - no need to pick up the cover to get to the straw. Cool!

Rafael; Thanks for the info on having yours in a fairly dry environment. Gives me more confidence to try this without the humidity chambers I've been using. What kind of "nutrients" are you using in your water? I agree, larger straws would make for easier watering. But the little syringe droppers work pretty good for the smaller straws too.

Subject: EXTREME Propagation fIGS Replies: 51
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 2,979
 
Based on everything I've heard & read, figs thrive best in base or alkaline soil conditions. So, adding lime is good. Also using a hardwood mulch over a pine based mulch would be better. Not that the hardwood mulch would provide any significant benefits. It's just that the pine might provide negative results in the long run if used extensively. (This doesn't apply to just getting cuttings started. It seems using pine in this way is beneficial in the short term.)

So, do the lemons really offer any secret/special benefits? I doubt there's any special benefit over any other decomposing organic matter - Just my take on it.

Subject: Arctic blast coming - questions about space heater use Replies: 44
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 1,935
 

I personally like Jacks suggestions. I have more than one farm store nearby that have those watering bucket heaters.

I will be using something similar when I get my greenhouse built. I have some old aquarium heaters for larger tanks (55 gal+) that should work pretty well in a 50 gal plastic barrel. I also have one of those heaters that attaches directly to the top of a propane tank (BBQ grill size).


Just some other ideas to consider. 


Subject: Pictorial: The 5 Minute Mini SIP Replies: 116
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 7,919
 

De nada, Frank. Hablo un pocinto de espanol :) . Guess you need a spanish speaking computer to make it look right though LOL.

Yes, the little clear cups do have 3 or 4 holes in them just below the peat pots. I think you can see them if you look closely at the second pic. I used a syringe type medicine dropper to water them. One of those large turkey/meat injectors from Wally World might work even better (hold more water per load). 

Not really sure what the yarn is made of. It feels like one of those with some polyester or nylon in it. Maybe a cotton blend. I imagine this would make some difference. But maybe just the open, loose, weave is more of a factor than the type of fabric. Just haven't fully experimented with that yet.

Whatever the material, this one just happened to work very well.

I may stick to using my covered aquarium on my more valuable cuttings. But I will experiment without the humidity chamber on some cuttings I have a lot of.


Subject: Pictorial: The 5 Minute Mini SIP Replies: 116
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 7,919
 
I haven't read this entire thread so my question may have been answered and I didn't see it yet. Great thread BTW Frank....... 

So, is no one using a humidity chamber in junction with these little SIPs? If not, I'm just thinking how nice that would be to by-pass using that step.

I used this mini-SIP last year to start some Papaya plants. It worked fantastic but I won't be starting any more Papaya plants until I get my greenhouse built............one of these years.

I used some small peat pots set inside of clear plastic cups. The clear cups were nice for monitoring what the roots were doing. I didn't use the standard wicking system. I simply used yarn and it worked quite well. Here are a couple pics of my set up and the results. Note the dates on the plants. The smaller ones, in the plain peat pots, were started a few days before the larger ones:

Fig Stuff 041.jpg Fig Stuff 043.jpg Fig Stuff 045.jpg Fig Stuff 049.jpg 

Attached Images
jpeg Fig_Stuff_045.jpg (349.97 KB, 52 views)


Subject: Goofed on Dormant Figs? Solutions? Replies: 5
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 456
 
Hi Andy. It happens. It looks like you're just gonna have to let 'em grow indoors now. Like Rich mentioned above, the best thing to do now is to give them as much light as possible until spring. Just keep a close eye on them. They could lose one or two of those first leaves if they get too much light right after being in the dark basement. They should adjust pretty quickly though and just start growing for you.

You'll also want to be real careful when you do start putting them back outside. Even though you might be able to give them some nice bright artificial light or keep them in front of a window through the winter, this is still a greatly reduced amount of light compared to real, direct, sunlight. So just transition them slowly over a period of a couple of weeks or so. Start them in a shady spot outdoors and then every other day or so give them a little more sun until the leaves are fully "hardened off". You'll be able to tell if you've given them too much sun because the leaves will start showing signs of sun burn/scald. 

It may be a little hassle to baby them until it's warm enough to transition them back outside. But look at the bright side. You'll have a great head-start on growth for when spring does come :-) ! 

Hope this helps.

Subject: Zida Fig Tree Got one today.. Replies: 15
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 1,238
 
I've heard some say that they've had Zidi set fruit without caprification (not sure if that's spelled right). It seems to be semi-persistant without the wasp. I have one small tree that hasn't set any yet.

Here's an interesting thread about Zidi: http://figs4funforum.websitetoolbox.com/post/Possible-Zidi-breaking-news-5945663 

Subject: Mario's Fig Tree Cuttings Available Replies: 39
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 3,191
 
Hey Doug. You can always buy sodas for friends & family LOL. It's crazy the lengths we sometimes go to for our addiction isn't it :-} ? Crazy fun though right?

George, you're quite welcome. I feel that bonus cutting was the least I could do for all those interesting GM varieties I rec'd some time back. Besides, I feel that sending you one will help to ensure the success of that variety - no pressure though ;-) .   

If you ever need a "kick-back" on one of those you sent me (the ones I succeeded with that is), just say the word.

Subject: Mario's Fig Tree Cuttings Available Replies: 39
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 3,191
 
You go Doug man!

Hasn't even been 3 weeks since I sent them has it?

Subject: Waxing the ends on cuttings ? Replies: 9
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 1,342
 
I agree with what's been said above. Saran wrap is an excellent way to seal the natural moisture inside the cuttings. But I'm beginning to feel that dipping the entire cutting in wax may be a step above the plastic wrap. I've been doing both on many cuttings for some time now. Can't imagine how it could hurt anything.

Subject: Mario's Fig Tree Cuttings Available Replies: 39
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 3,191
 
Lulu & Pooya. Very glad to hear that your packages arrived in good shape.

Karima; Sorry, I'm not able to ship plant material outside the US at this time.

If anyone hasn't rec'd their package yet and feel you should have, please let me know.

Several to go yet..... 

Subject: Unlikeable known figs Replies: 28
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 1,585
 
I like this thread Dennis. I venture to say it's going to become a well liked thread by most of us.

I'm just now starting to to come full circle, so to speak. In that I'm just beginning to see that no fig should be neglected based on someone else's taste or preconceptions. I think many of us start out this way in our quest to get "the best" figs in favor of those that aren't considered to be "the best". 

Definite props goes to Mr Robins for that quote. He gets no argument from me on that! Here's mine: "A ripe fig in the hand is better than a dozen unripe ones on the bush" (granted it's more of my own adaptation of another famous quote;) ). 

H2, I also fully agree with you on what you said above. In fact I think you've said this same thing sooo many other times. We really shouldn't discount ANY fig variety until we've fully tested out how it does in our specific climate. Something that I know you've been working on in your area for many years now. Don't make a final decision until it's been trialed and tasted - Right? 

Having said all this, it still hasn't made it any easier for me to decide which ones will get neglected or not, since I don't have enough time for all of them!! Oh, the bane of the fignuts! 

Subject: Algerian Watts Replies: 7
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 968
 
This is another case of my sharing with my friend & him having better success than I. I don't have this tree but I do now have more cuttings to work with. Good thing I shared with my bud. He has many varieties established that I don't that I've shared with him over the past few years.

Richard is going to be wondering why he's suddenly getting so many emails about this variety.

Subject: Afghan - E Replies: 6
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 705
 
I may have asked Richard about this fig when I first ordered it but I sure don't recall what his reply might have been. Yes, I suppose I could get back to him for some input but that would make too much sense now wouldn't it :) ?

Sounds good Dennis. Good to know that he does have some pics of it. I'll wait a bit to see what pans out here before I get back to Richard about it.

Thanks guys.

Subject: Algerian Watts Replies: 7
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 968
 
Here's another one from Mr Richard Watts. I can't seem to find any solid info on this one either. Has anyone grown this one to fruiting size?

Bass started a couple of threads on Algerian figs. Some real beauties but I have no idea if any of those are anything like the one from Richard:
http://figs4funforum.websitetoolbox.com/post/algerian-figs-6180222?highlight=algerian

http://figs4funforum.websitetoolbox.com/post/algerian-figs-video-4203009?highlight=algerian

So if anyone has any info on the one from R.W. it would be very helpful.

Thank you.

 

Subject: Afghan - E Replies: 6
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 705
 
Thanks for the replies. It's good to see that others have this one growing. My buddy has the advantage of growing his in a greenhouse. It was about 4' before he just pruned a little off of it. After sticking a few of the cuttings for himself I ended up with a few also. I'll see what I can do about getting this one going for myself now :-) .

So, nobody out there with pictures of Afghan-E?
 

Subject: Afghan - E Replies: 6
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 705
 
This is a variety that I'd rec'd cuttings of from Richard Watts a couple years ago. I kept a piece for myself but failed to get it to root. I gave the other piece to a friend of mine and he did, however, get one growing.

This year he got fruit from it. He said he took pics but I haven't gotten access to those yet. Is anyone else growing this one? I have to assume that this is not the same as Jon's Afghan A. I say this because Richard had them listed separately on his list at the time.

My friend also had Armenian set fruit for him right next to where he was growing the Afghan E. Because of this he couldn't recall which was which but that one of them was a "dry" fig. Also that one of them was a light fig and the other a dark. So, I can only assume that the Afghan E is the dark one since Jon shows the Armenian as a light yellow/green fig on his varieties page. 

This appears to be the only other thread with the Afghan E in the thread topic:

http://figs4funforum.websitetoolbox.com/post/afghanistanica-vs-afghane-6308051?highlight=afghan

Any new information and pictures on this variety would be most helpful. I will try to get some pictures from my friend but it may take a little while. He can only get dial-up internet where he is. I may have to pay him a visit with a thumb drive in hand in order to get those pics loaded onto my computer.

Subject: Haikel Lebanese Replies: 3
Posted By: saxonfig Views: 749
 
Hey Steve.

I'm just seeing this thread for the first time. You seem to be the only person so far to report getting ripe fruit from the Haikel (with pics anyway). I'm glad to see it. 

That fruit really looks different than the average fruit I've seen on the parent trees. The skin and flesh color look about right except the skin color isn't generally as uniform as the one fruit you have pictured. Most fruit I've seen tend to be more two-toned with yellowish near the neck and brownish blush being toward the fat end. The fruit seem to be more elongate on the more mature trees as well. 

I'm sure this has a lot to do with your climate as well as it being a less mature tree. I look forward to seeing how it progresses as your tree matures.

I really like this fig, especially when you get some fruit that are just right. To me, they seem to have a taste with a slight "peachy" flavor IMO. I would guess that they will perform even better in a dryer climate.

Keep us posted on how yours continues to do in that climate. 

 

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