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Subject: 1-2 days from a fresh fig Replies: 9
Posted By: GoodDaughter Views: 1,178
 
My mother is 71, and grew up here in Texas. I asked her just the other day  what it was like when she was young and no one had air conditioning. She said people just sat around sweating and being miserable, but because *everyone* was miserable, no one realized they were miserable. She said the worst was trying to sleep at night. When I was little, we didn't have air conditioning for a few years, and then when I got married, we didn't have it for a few years. Lived in Texas, too. Guess what? We sat around sweating and were miserable. I like living with old-fashioned ways, but doing without air conditioning is something I would not willingly do ever again.

That fig looks pretty good to me.

I have two humongous figs on my 'Danny's Delight' and am watching them. They may be ready to pick in a day or two. It will be the first one's I've ever had from that vareity.



Subject: Birds and Unripe Figs Replies: 17
Posted By: GoodDaughter Views: 5,789
 

Hah, a couple of kids down the road stole the blow-up snakes out of my fig trees several years ago. Really, I wan't too upset, because I never got used to seeing the snakes, even though they weren't real, and I'd see them and scream two or three times a week.


Subject: Birds and Unripe Figs Replies: 17
Posted By: GoodDaughter Views: 5,789
 
In my big trees I use the big plastic owls with the rotating heads and sparkly eyes. The only problem is that I have to move them every day or the birds get used to them and dont' frighten them off. My main bird predator is mockingbirds. It's a pain in the neck moving the stupid owls every day, but it helps a lot. I have them stuck on long pieces of e.m.t. pipe and I stick the pipe in the ground so it looks like the owls are sitting in the trees.

I found big plastic hawks a few months ago, with glittery eyes. I am eager to put these in the trees as well, to see how they work. The squirrels decimate my pear tree every year, so maybe I can put a hawk in the pear tree and see if it works.

Subject: what is your favorite fig to eat? Replies: 23
Posted By: GoodDaughter Views: 2,225
 

Green Ischia. Sweet, sticky, very rich fig flavor.


Subject: Toughest To Root Replies: 33
Posted By: GoodDaughter Views: 2,389
 

I'm going to try the baggie/sphagnum moss method with some greenwood rose cuttings, because I've always heard they root well under mist. Maybe the baggie method will work. Can't hurt to try!


Subject: Toughest To Root Replies: 33
Posted By: GoodDaughter Views: 2,389
 
I tried rooting three Barnisottes a few years ago from UCDavis, and none of them rooted, just shriveled.

I guess I'm full of hot air, pfffttt!  All of the cuttings I got from Jon have rooted and are growing. I got Preta, Red Italian, Cucumber, Black Madiera Seedling, and Violette de Bordeaux.  But then, maybe these are varieties that root easily. Don't know. I just did the sphagnum moss in the baggie in a slightly warm place routine and potted up into barely moist mixture of perlite/rose potting soil (about 70/30 mixture) leaving the clinging sphagnum moss attached to the roots into styrofoam cups (not clear cups) and only coddled them a little. They have been on the back porch in the fluctuating temps for the past few weeks. Anywhere from the mid-40's to the mid 80's, in bright indirect light with a bit of late afternoon direct light. Kept barely watered, whatever humidity was present outside. It's been a bit dry lately, slightly windy.  So far, it is working well.

Subject: Chinese Figs Replies: 22
Posted By: GoodDaughter Views: 4,231
 
Hey ya'll... be careful of those links. I clicked on the first one and was looking at the pictures and my AVG popped up an alert, asking me if it wanted me to move a virus to the vault. Thank goodness I had it or that Chinese site would have gotten in my computer.



Subject: Chinese Figs Replies: 22
Posted By: GoodDaughter Views: 4,231
 
What neat pictures, thank you for sharing them!

I have no idea what the yellow variety is, but they look like they would taste very good. I'd love to have some cuttings of that one.

Man, they look delicious.

Subject: New Addition to the Collecton Replies: 9
Posted By: GoodDaughter Views: 994
 
Thank you for that link, it explains a great deal. It has been written since I originally got my plants. I got the two I still have in 2003, and the one from Forest Farm in I believe 2004 or 2005.



Subject: Figs and diabetics Replies: 19
Posted By: GoodDaughter Views: 1,432
 
I was sitting here reading thru the thread and waiting for someone to mention burning the fuzzy little spines off, preferrably while it's still attached to the mother plant, and then pulling the pads or tunas off and peeling them.

Ranchers will still flame cactus plants with these big propane tanks on wheels and a flame wand so their cattle can eat them.

I personally don't like the taste of the tunas... they have an unpleasant, musky taste. Makes beautiful jelly but blech, the taste....

There are spineless prickly pear available.  

There is also an insect, I think it's like some kind of white fuzzy scale bug, that attaches to prickly pear, it looks like cotton ball fibers stuck to the cactus. When scraped off and mashed it makes a bright red dye that Native Americans used to make dye for wool for their weavings and clothing.


Subject: New member - Hello Replies: 14
Posted By: GoodDaughter Views: 999
 

Hello, glad you joined! 


Subject: New Addition to the Collecton Replies: 9
Posted By: GoodDaughter Views: 994
 
The top photos definitely don't look like my F. afghanistanicas either. The leaves on mine are much more divided and serrated. I had three plants-- one from Forest Farm which looked exactly like yours but it died a couple of years ago for no reason I could find, and two that were purchased here in Texas--one at The Antique Rose Emporium and one at a local, small nursery. These two look identical to eachother with leaves much more divided and serrated than those in your pics.

The one I got from Forest Farm lived for about 3 years and never got leaves that resemble the other two I have now. Also, the 'trunk' and branches, if you can call them that, on my two remaining ones are much more slender than what your pictures show. Mine have never formed figs, but I am not really expecting them to. I just have them in with my other ficus varieties.

Back when I bought the one from Forest Farm, there was some question about the origin of their 'strain' of F. afghanistanica because the one I bought from them did not resemble at all the other two I had, and I had emailed them with some questions and concerns. If I recall correctly, the seed was supposed to have come from someone in Georgia (???) who brought it back from the middle east and gave seed to various people.  I don't recall all the details, it's been too long, but the man I spoke to at Forest Farm was concerned enough that he emailed me and said he was going to research his seed origin further.

As far as I have been able to determine, the two I have that I purchased as F. afghanistanica do match other photos online, so I am reasonably sure the ones I have were identified correctly.

Also, they don't resemble the pic of the Afghan A at all.

I really NEED to figure out how to get pictures from my camera to the computer to here---it would be so much easier than trying to explain.

Subject: Tree's Of Joy ( Bass ) Replies: 5
Posted By: GoodDaughter Views: 870
 

Pigs?


Subject: New member - Hello Replies: 14
Posted By: GoodDaughter Views: 999
 
I'm tired just reading all that! 

I'm not used to being home like this, and have been doing something outside every day this past week. Feels weird being here--- like I am out of place or something. But I keep planting a bit every day. We have about another two weeks to get everything in before I have to start worrying about vegetables pollenating during the high temps of summer.



Subject: New member - Hello Replies: 14
Posted By: GoodDaughter Views: 999
 

I ripped out two roses that weren't doing well a while ago, so I could use the space for crookneck squash....


Subject: New member - Hello Replies: 14
Posted By: GoodDaughter Views: 999
 
Hi John, and welcome. I am still fairly new to the forum, and have been made to feel comfortable here, too.  I left my job last Tuesday and plan to spend as much time as possible growing FOOD this spring/summer. With the loss of my income and rising prices, every bit I can grow will help offset expenses.

I got bit by the fig bug many years ago, and I'll tell you, it's a terminal condition. Once you have it, you never get over the thrill of the hunt for new varieties or the joy of a new acquisition!


Subject: how close do you plant in ground? Replies: 10
Posted By: GoodDaughter Views: 1,043
 
I've got peaches, nectarines and plums about the size of a quarter right now. Citrus are loaded with flowers. I was a sucker and bought a couple of the low chill cherries, even though they are supposed to not do well in high humidity. I just couldn't resist trying. Will see what they do, they are in 20" pots right now. I'm always willing to try something new at least once. Tried the Dorman Red raspberries twice, no luck.

Noticed that the unusually long, cold winter (relatively speaking, of course) has caused an unprecedented blooming of wild blackberries. I may have to brave the chiggers next month and go blackberry picking.

Subject: how close do you plant in ground? Replies: 10
Posted By: GoodDaughter Views: 1,043
 

RKN is a pretty serious problem here. I've found that many of my figs do well in the ground--Green Ischia, Black Misison, Banana, Red Gold, Celeste, etc., --but for example my Marseille and Kadota got so stunted by RKN I finally just took cuttings and grow them in pots now. Few fruit, but oh well...


Subject: how close do you plant in ground? Replies: 10
Posted By: GoodDaughter Views: 1,043
 
Watch out for fruit bats... I hate bats...

Oh no, it's an attack of fruit bats!!! Eating my figs!! Get some hot water, get some disinfectant, get some iodine!!

Yeah, just joking. I know fruit bats don't live here. I just couldn't resist.

Subject: Nexoe fig variety from Denmark Replies: 3
Posted By: GoodDaughter Views: 1,444
 

It certainly is an odd looking one....


Subject: Cuttings in sphagnum moss Replies: 13
Posted By: GoodDaughter Views: 4,527
 

Me too;  no mold at all in the SM/baggie/warm area method. On about half of my cuttings I cleaned them with the 10% bleach, but the rest just went into baggies with moss and they were free of mold too. And EVERY ONE of my cuttings rooted just fine. At different rates, but just fine. I potted up into cups and watered at the root area with one of those long basting needle things you use to inject flavoring into meat. I wanted to have the water down where the roots were and no just soak all the soil in the cup. Worked really well.


Subject: a list of closed eye varieties Replies: 36
Posted By: GoodDaughter Views: 10,413
 

Oh, I'm going to be watching this thread closely and taking lots of notes.


Subject: Some Pics I'm Bored Replies: 11
Posted By: GoodDaughter Views: 1,455
 
I planted my tomatoes and peppers outside yesterday and today. Night time temps may be a bit chilly yet, but my job is so physically demanding I figured I had better plant them while I had the energy and willpower. I've used those 'wall o'water' things before and my tomatoes did well, and I know that even though they held heat, the plants still got cold at night.

I grow some heirlooms, but with the root knot nematodes around here I do have to grow some hybrids if I want usable amounts of fruit.

Going to wait another two or three weeks to plant bush beans, squash and cucumbers.

Oh, and I potted up some figs today too.

Subject: Cuttings List posted 10:00 PST today Replies: 62
Posted By: GoodDaughter Views: 3,973
 
I won some of the 'Cucumber' cuttings from Jon's Ebay listing the other day, and that's all I'm doing for this year. Every cotton pickin' one of the cuttings I received last month have rooted and are in cups and have an inch or so of new growth, and what I have obtained elsewhere is growing well, so the 'Cucumber' variety will satisfy me---for this year!

Thanks again Jon for making it possible for us to obtain such nice scion!

Subject: Best Air Layering On Yr 1 or Yr 2 Wood ? Replies: 17
Posted By: GoodDaughter Views: 2,698
 

I once air layered a green ischia. Took a branch that was prolly 2 or 3 years old and about 1" diameter, and placed the layer about 3 ft. from the end of the branch. Ended up with a root ball inside the moss about the size of a tennis ball. I cut it loose during the heat of summer and potted it up in a 1 gal pot, regular miracle grow type mix. The leaves wilted down and most of them fell off, but a few leaves at the top stayed and it started growing well. I had to stake it up in the pot. It was a whopper. Gave it to my parents for their yard. I had air layered many different kinds of plants and usually layered smaller cuttings of about 1 ft. on my figs, so I guess I just had dumb luck layering one that big.


Subject: Congratulation to Nelson Esteves on the birth of his first child Replies: 44
Posted By: GoodDaughter Views: 2,267
 

Congratulations to you and the proud mother!  What a blessing babies are. I hope you'll post a picture sometime soon!


Subject: Fig species photos & seedling ficus palmata, etc Replies: 2
Posted By: GoodDaughter Views: 1,460
 

I have a potted roxburghii/auriculata. I'd flip my lid if it ever got as pretty as some of those in the pictures.

I also have a potted f. sycomorus. Kind of tall and spindly but seems to be happy.

Thanks for the link, I enjoy seeing pics of the various ficus spp. That f. mysorensis or however it's spelled was interesting looking. I could definitely expand my collection.





 

Subject: Getting worried about UC Davis order... Replies: 20
Posted By: GoodDaughter Views: 1,515
 

When I have requested plant material from UC Davis in the past, there were a couple of varieties of figs and pomegranates that I had requested and gotten confirmations on that were not actually available at the time my request was 'filled' because of circumstances beyond the control of the staff there, i.e. weather related issues. Sometimes these things happen with living plant materials that can't be predicted in advance. However, I've always gotten my shipments, even if they were short a variety a couple of times.


Subject: Preto Replies: 55
Posted By: GoodDaughter Views: 5,118
 
My Pretos have rooted, too.

Pretty neat way of doing it, thanks for sharing.

Subject: Have a problem with Fico Preta rooting Replies: 6
Posted By: GoodDaughter Views: 776
 
Thanks everyone. I think I'll just plant it so that the roots are covered up, which should leave about .5" sticking up out of the soil.

Maybe if I can find that cord that connects my camera to the computer, I might upload a picture of it. I didn't know that I could upload a picture directly from my computer.  Most other sites you have to put a picture on Photobucket or some such place first and then make a link to it (I'm not too computer literate, as y'all can plainly see) and with dial up, it's awfully slow.

Thanks for the help!

Subject: Have a problem with Fico Preta rooting Replies: 6
Posted By: GoodDaughter Views: 776
 

Both of the Fico Preta cuttings I got from Jon have rooted! One rooted with most of the roots being at the cut end of the cutting and a few roots along the length of it.  But one problem... on the other cutting, the roots are near the growing tip of the cutting and not toward the bottom.

I rooted them in damp sphagnum moss in a baggie.

I have potted up the cutting that rooted 'normally'.  But I put the other cutting back into the baggie until I could determine what would be best to do, so I am asking for advice here.

Should I leave it in the baggie/moss for a bit longer to see if it makes roots further down?

I wish I could attach a picture of the cutting.


ETA---I can simply attach a picture to my post by getting it from my computer?  I don't have to send the picture to one of those picture hosting websites? 


Subject: An Earlier Start On Driveway Replies: 21
Posted By: GoodDaughter Views: 1,166
 
Temp here today was around 75, cloudy, very humid. Supposed to have rain tomorrow, temps in the upper 60's I believe, and upper 50's to low 60's overnight for the next few nights.

I've had my potted figs out all winter, they did fine but then we didn't get any temps colder than 17 here, but plenty of nights in the 20's. No damage, no problems so far. Everything starting to leaf out.

Still working on improving the appearance of my pot ghetto.  I did buy a bunch of 12" concrete paving stones in a pretty light brown color and set them into the ground along one side of my back porch for my potted figs and citrus to sit on. It does look nicer than it did when the pots were just sitting on the ground.

Subject: More Gel cup fun Replies: 6
Posted By: GoodDaughter Views: 1,013
 

You know, when I start rose cuttings, I scrape the skin off one side of the cutting near the bottom of the cutting. I read it somewhere and it seems to help them root in higher percentages. I've been doing it so long with the roses I can't even remember where I read it, just that I did read it. Never thought about doing something similar with the figs.


Subject: Fig bonbon Replies: 29
Posted By: GoodDaughter Views: 2,069
 
Yep, and from what I understand, Hwy. 288 occupies much of the land that was orchards from that time. Have a brother who lives in Friendswood, and a couple of years ago I was driving down FM 2353 and just before I got to 518, I saw a big banner for a 'Fig Festival' of some sort. I never did check into that, but maybe I should. Who knows what kind of fun one might have....

My grandmother told me a while back how good the 'Fignolias' were. Googled for a recipe but couldn't find one. I have a Magnolia fig shrub in the yard. Fruit usually splits/ferments on the tree but once every several years, I'll get some edible fruit. Last summer was very dry here and I was actually able to pick and eat ripe Magnolia figs for the first time in oh 5 or 6 years. Huge things, just huge.

Subject: One Node Wonders Replies: 29
Posted By: GoodDaughter Views: 3,557
 
Funny about the Olympics... I am always happy for whoever wins. Doesn't seem to be as much team loyalty for me for some reason.

Back to the topic... I got a Red Gold node to root once. I don't have any pictures, but was really surprised that it rooted--it was just the node with about 1/2" of cutting on either side of it. I planted it on it's side and it rooted. It's about 5' tall now.

Subject: Fig bonbon Replies: 29
Posted By: GoodDaughter Views: 2,069
 
I was thinking maybe they injected the chocolate thru the eye or something. Duh.

Back in the 1930's or '40's a company in Texas used to produce 'Fignolias', I think they were dipped in chocolate. Used to be an orchard down the coast to supply the factory with figs. Of course it was paved over decades ago.

Subject: Fig bonbon Replies: 29
Posted By: GoodDaughter Views: 2,069
 

I wonder how they get the chocolate inside? They look incredibly good.


Subject: What is it? Replies: 24
Posted By: GoodDaughter Views: 1,276
 
Nelson, don't forget to post them in the future. I'd really like to see how yours grow.



Subject: What is it? Replies: 24
Posted By: GoodDaughter Views: 1,276
 
Nelson, the picture you posted is great. That would be a wonderful border plant.

I have a Black Jack, wonder if it will exhibit the same kind of growth. It's just a tiny thing right now.

Subject: What is it? Replies: 24
Posted By: GoodDaughter Views: 1,276
 
Well now, that's just the cure for my pot ghetto problem, isn't it ... I could pot up a few fig trees like that and set them in front of my mismatched pots, and as they cascade down and out the ugly pots would be hidden...  May have to think about buying some weeping figs somewhere.

Anyway, it's a very pretty plant you have.

Subject: Burgeoning pot ghetto-- ideas please? Replies: 10
Posted By: GoodDaughter Views: 1,115
 
Thanks everyone, I appreciate the sympathy and ideas. Well, *some* of the ideas, LOL! 

Where we are is flat and very heavily wooded. We lost a few very large, old oaks during hurricane Ike so the back yard has a little more sun now, but I am not sure it's enough to support fruiting plants. I may put a potted fig back there to see what happens, just as an experiment. If it proves to be sunny enough, I can put more back there.  We're not really wanting to cut down any trees, because the ones we have are all mature.

I like the idea of making a corral. Maybe I could bunch the pots up inside one so it wouldn't be too long or rectangular.

No flat roofs, unfortunately.

And we already do live kinda in the sticks. At least no one around here cares what anyone else's yard looks like, so my problem is not complaining neighbors or any homeowner's association or anything like that.  We try to keep the place nice looking, but how nice can it look with a Freightliner in the driveway and a hodgepodge of pots everywhere? I just want it to look a little nicer for *me*. DH couldn't care less.

I'd be embarrassed to post pictures. Trust me, it's awful. One thing we're going to do is to get some of those 18x18 concrete stepping stones and pave the ground beside the back porch where the citrus and figs are now just sitting on the ground. Having the pots sitting on a clean, uniform surface should make it all look a little neater. But there will still be the problem of two long, parallel rows of mismatched pots. 



Subject: Burgeoning pot ghetto-- ideas please? Replies: 10
Posted By: GoodDaughter Views: 1,115
 
I will start by saying that our property is so full of stuff I am very limited on where I can keep new additions to my fig (and other plant) collections. I have several very large figs in the ground, other fruit trees, a large antique rose garden, a native plant area, a bible garden area, various raised beds for vegetables, parking for dh's Freightliner and our vehicles, his shop in back for building rat rods, my herd of poultry, etc etc etc. I do have a greenhouse, but it's full all the time. Ditto with storage sheds.

Also important to know that much of our property is very shady. Too shady to grow much, and the areas that are sunny are full of everything mentioned above.

So I have a pot ghetto. Figs and citrus in pots, which are *mostly* the same size but colors vary as I don't have a lot of $$$ for fancy matching pots. I'd rather have nice plants and marginal pots, I guess.  Right now, the 10 citrus trees are in 30" pots which are sitting on the ground, lined up along one side of my back porch deck (and no, the porch deck is not an option for putting a lot of plants on BECAUSE IT'S ALREADY FULL). I have added a row of figs in 17 to 24" pots beside the citrus pots.

Y'all, it's horrible.

I've tried picturesquely grouping a few pots of figs here and there around the yard, tucking them into the bible garden, the rose garden, the vegetable garden, alongside the driveway (HUGE mistake) and clustered around the greenhouse and sheds. And it looks horrible. It looks like a ghetto out there, or like one of those 'you might be a redneck if...' deals.

Does anyone have any ideas on how to group or arrange all this mess? I really can't give up acquiring figs because.... well... just because. I can't go vertical in my attempts either as I can't lift a lot due to bad shoulders. Any way to hide long rows of pots? Even when the pots are the same size and color, they just look messy.

Out of ideas, please suggest...

Subject: Fig Recipes Replies: 11
Posted By: GoodDaughter Views: 1,045
 
Fresh figs are best.

Home canned figs are second best.

And I have at least a dozen pints left to get me through the rest of the year until I can get fresh ones again.

Subject: T-Budding in Turkey Replies: 12
Posted By: GoodDaughter Views: 1,878
 

Would it matter if the bud was grafted onto another F. carica that is not a seedling? I tried grafting a couple of different buds onto my Green Ischia that is espaliered. Thought it would be neat to have two or three different figs on one tree.


Subject: T-Budding in Turkey Replies: 12
Posted By: GoodDaughter Views: 1,878
 
Wonderful photos, thank you for posting them! 

A long time ago on Gardenweb, there was talk about grafting and I gave it a try but it failed. If I remember correctly, there was a discussion about what time of year to remove the buds from the scion, because the bark and bud would slip right off but only at a certain time of year. It's been so long I don't remember the details, but I remember the bark and bud did indeed slip right off, and I made the T-shaped cut into the branch and slipped in the bud, and taped it with electrical tape. HOWEVER, I did not prune off the end of the branch as shown. Maybe that's why my grafts didn't work?  Also, the scion wood was a bit smaller than what the man in the photo is using, and the branch I grafted onto was not nearly that big. 

Spring is almost here and I may have to try it again. How exciting!

Subject: Rooting at Guantanamo Replies: 6
Posted By: GoodDaughter Views: 734
 

Gorgi, the main reason I got my F. sycomorus was to add to a garden with a theme of plants mentioned specifically in the bible.


Subject: Rooting at Guantanamo Replies: 6
Posted By: GoodDaughter Views: 734
 
What an interesting thing to learn!  I have a F. sycomorus in a 10" pot, it's about 2.5 ft. high with a few slender branches. I have it sitting just inside my patio door right now. 

I don't expect mine to ever get very big or to bear, either. The main reason I got mine was for historical significance and of course, because it's a fig!

Subject: Im Curious About This Replies: 31
Posted By: GoodDaughter Views: 1,631
 
Martin, I just wanted to give it a try too, just out of curiosity. I understand you're just exprimenting.  I like to try new things on occasion and who knows, maybe it might end up working. I couldn't afford to spend much experimenting, but sometimes it's still fun. 

I'll be checking back to see how your experiment goes.



Subject: Im Curious About This Replies: 31
Posted By: GoodDaughter Views: 1,631
 

No Menard's stores here. Maybe I can find something similar online. Thanks!


Subject: Im Curious About This Replies: 31
Posted By: GoodDaughter Views: 1,631
 

May I ask where you found this? I haven't seen it before and would like to give it a try on a few things.


 

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