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Subject: Swiss Army grafting/budding knife Replies: 19
Posted By: paulandirene Views: 3,515
 
I checked amazon.ca and couldn't find the same model, or any Victorinox. Dang, you'd think Victorinox and Amazon would want the business.

I found some Victorinox grafting/budding knives here, but not the same model

Subject: Snow Coming Your Way Replies: 54
Posted By: paulandirene Views: 2,524
 
I'm in California [Folsom] for a few days. Considering that it was 12 degrees when I left Albuquerque, I am glad to be away from the cold for a bit. C'mon spring!

Subject: Swiss Army grafting/budding knife Replies: 19
Posted By: paulandirene Views: 3,515
 
Ottowan I had thought of a knife like that [and I do like the bark lifter better] but I didn't like the shape of the blade tip, which is why I chose the double blade model.

Subject: Swiss Army grafting/budding knife Replies: 19
Posted By: paulandirene Views: 3,515
 
Rafed, I think you'll enjoy it. However, I would reserve that one just for horticulture. There are a gazillion models that would serve you well on the road and elsewhere. :-)
Just a few: 
http://www.victorinox.com/category/1/100/1000/1103
http://www.victorinox.com/category/1/100/1004



Ottowan, the raised portion isn't sharpened, it is the "bark lifter", which is beveled so it can fit more easily beneath a slice in the bark so you can gently lift it up . Check this out, you can see the variety of bark lifters on such knives.  http://www.victorinox.com/category/1/100/1006/1105


Bass, good advice about safety.

I might buy some gloves like this:
http://www.amazon.com/BladeX5-Classic-Resistant-Gloves-Approved/dp/B003DZ02MU/

Subject: Swiss Army grafting/budding knife Replies: 19
Posted By: paulandirene Views: 3,515
 
This grafting/budding knife's blade is beveled on just one side, as I believe [because it's not here with me to confirm] is the edge.

I have a question for people more familiar with cutting tool design than I am. Considering that most people are right handed, I figure this knife is designed with them in mind.....would a left handed person's use of this knife make it perform differently...with the bevel and edge facing down instead of up? 
 [I am right handed, my wife is left handed]

Ruben, I think you'll like it. Nice knife, Bill! Victorinox definitely makes nice stuff.....sadly I tend to lose them before they would ever get dull. [heck, most of them are probably just misplaced somewhere at home] Luckily I have not yet lost one to the TSA either.....knock on wood. I plan to guard this one with my life.



Subject: Swiss Army grafting/budding knife Replies: 19
Posted By: paulandirene Views: 3,515
 
 Hi folks,
Just thought I'd pass on some info.  I had an Amazon.com gift certificate that was to expire soon, and found a two-bladed Swiss Army budding and grafting knife made by Victorinox.

Victorinox 53561  [sometimes shown as 39045 but I can't see any differences]

It arrived yesterday and is indeed sharp as a razor, and has a bark lifter. I think it will work very well....maybe I'll wear a woodcarving glove so I don't slice myself.

Good picture but no real description:
http://www.victorinox.com/product/1/100/1006/1105/3.9045

Here's what I ordered:
http://www.amazon.com/Victorinox-Swiss-Army-Grafter-Garden/dp/B000687AUY
$21.95 + Free Shipping  [ordered through Amazon shipped from Swiss Knife Shop]
[currently shows as out of stock...it said 3 available when I made the purchase late last week]

There's another Amazon listing that shows what looks like the same exact knife, lower quality picture]
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0007LTPNK
$23.49 + $8.35 shipping


This store has them in stock
http://www.swissknivesexpress.com/grafswisarkn.html
$20.25 + [what says to be] Free Shipping


Subject: Powdered sulpher Replies: 12
Posted By: paulandirene Views: 1,147
 

Physan 20 is available on Amazon and eBay.


Subject: ebay white brooklyn cuttings,, real or not?? Replies: 11
Posted By: paulandirene Views: 1,266
 
Grant I just sent you a private message

Subject: Snow Coming Your Way Replies: 54
Posted By: paulandirene Views: 2,524
 
Despite the cold and wind, yesterday's sunshine reduced the snow [wish it hadn't because snow is an insulator]

My in-ground trees are protected by wire fencing filled with leaves from autumn [my neighbors are happy to give me their bags of fallen leaves rather than leave them for the green recycling pickup, because they get the bags back]



Attached Images
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Subject: Snow Coming Your Way Replies: 54
Posted By: paulandirene Views: 2,524
 
It's currently -11 degrees at my house here in Albuquerque. Coldest I remember in 20+ years


Attached Images
jpeg ten-below.jpg (289.70 KB, 159 views)


Subject: Are you hungry for a fresh figs? Replies: 29
Posted By: paulandirene Views: 2,478
 
I am indeed hungry for fresh figs. According to a temperature sensor hanging from one of my deciduous trees, it's -11 degrees F. here in Albuquerque.

Subject: All Points Bulletin - Looking for growers in Nashville, TN or surrounding area. Replies: 16
Posted By: paulandirene Views: 1,152
 
Cody,

Jason is right. Although there are honest fig sellers on eBay [many of them are members here], there are those who scam people by misrepresenting the variety of fig[s] they are selling.

And, you can not just take the Feedback as the main criteria. This is because, unlike most other products you buy on eBay, a long time usually passes between the sale and when you can determine what the variety is...or isn't. At that point, it is too late to give feedback or change your original feedback on the transaction.

Subject: Snow Coming Your Way Replies: 54
Posted By: paulandirene Views: 2,524
 

For the first time I have ever seen, a winter day  is actually colder [low and high temperatures] here in Albuquerque NM than it is at my brother's home in Fairbanks, Alaska.


Subject: Snow Coming Your Way Replies: 54
Posted By: paulandirene Views: 2,524
 
Stay safe Rafed. Enjoy San Diego and have a Karl Strauss beer for us.

Subject: Snow Coming Your Way Replies: 54
Posted By: paulandirene Views: 2,524
 
Icy roads here in Albuquerque, as we've been getting snow off and on since last night.

Although we commonly get low temperatures in single digits, it's supposed to drop below zero here this week.
[update: 1F tonight, -5◦ F. tomorrow night]


Glad we had some warning, which enabled me to collect two wheelbarrow loads of dry firewood and put it inside a covered patio before the snow began falling.

Subject: Fig Tree in Normandy near D Day beaches Replies: 8
Posted By: paulandirene Views: 1,036
 
Good point. I had thought Normandy was a harsher climate. I was in Asturias [near Cudillero] in late April, and there were plenty of fig trees around, including in front of the holiday cottage where we stayed.

Subject: Fig Tree in Normandy near D Day beaches Replies: 8
Posted By: paulandirene Views: 1,036
 

Yes I saw lots of fig trees in France, but not too many in Normandy, which has a  maritime climate like England rather than a Mediterranean climate like Provence.

I mainly took the picture because the area is of great historical importance to the world, especially to Americans, Canadians, British, Australians, New Zealanders, French, Polish and citizens of other nations that took part in the D Day landings and participated in the Allied Expeditionary Force. After seeing the invasion beaches and the hedgerow country, I fully realized that the success of the operation was a miracle.

Subject: Fig Tree in Normandy near D Day beaches Replies: 8
Posted By: paulandirene Views: 1,036
 
I found a picture of the fig tree in Normandy and marked its location on the map.



Attached Images
jpeg arromanches-fig.jpg (993.52 KB, 123 views)


Subject: Seeking Turkish figs Replies: 28
Posted By: paulandirene Views: 4,822
 

I'm with Sue. If a plant product comes from another country, without any indication about an import license, etc., the eBay seller can just say "well, I shipped them, but sorry, I have no control over US Customs procedures", that seems like a no-win scenario.


Subject: Past Season (Fond Memories) 2010 Replies: 10
Posted By: paulandirene Views: 856
 
My best fig memory from last year was being able to share figs with my father in law before he passed away. His sons don't have the horticultural interest that he did and I do, so he and I never ran out of things to talk about. Over the years we had shared tomatoes, peppers, apples, cherries and black currants with him. This past year it was figs, and he really enjoyed them.

Subject: It is winter here Replies: 90
Posted By: paulandirene Views: 3,866
 
Jon the amazing thing is my brothers and I all moved away to colder places...besides the Fairbanks brother we are in Sunset Zone 2A, 3A and 10....but we go home frequently.

Subject: It is winter here Replies: 90
Posted By: paulandirene Views: 3,866
 
25 degrees here in Albuquerque

However I talked to my brother in Fairbanks AK last night

Temperatures in Fairbanks for this past week:

Jan 16    Hi:  -23°F   Lo:    -30°F

Jan 17    Hi:  -17°F   Lo:    -33°F

Jan18    Hi:  -14°F   Lo:    -31°F

Jan 19    Hi:  -25°F   Lo:    -36°F

Jan 20    Hi:  -28°F   Lo:    -39°F

Jan 21    Hi:  -12°F   Lo:    -38°F

Today    Hi:  -22°F   Lo:    -39°F


Jon can you believe my brother moved from San Diego to Fairbanks??


Subject: Figs in Texas Replies: 3
Posted By: paulandirene Views: 939
 
My wife's aunt has a few citrus trees growing in her front yard in El Paso...not always the happiest looking because of frosts, but they've been there for a long time. I mention this because citrus is also a subtropical plant like figs.

El Paso doesn't get as cold as Albuquerque [where I live], so I would say that fairly cold hearty varieties would do fine with some winter protection for the first few years. However I defer to more experienced growers on here. As Jose ["loslunasfarms", also in the Albuquerque area] said in another post  "The problem here in the SW for us is our desiccating cold winter winds" And indeed, wind is a factor in El Paso as well as Albuquerque.



Subject: Greenhouse using recycled materials Replies: 3
Posted By: paulandirene Views: 781
 
Thanks for the advice. The prevailing winds blow from left to right, parallel to the wall, so it would make sense to put in put in ventilation points on each end to take advantage of it (Habitat's re-store has lots of used windows that would work.)
  
Also, I have two squirrel cage fans (like the one below), one of which I I have considered using with a thermostat to keep the greenhouse from getting too hot in summer.  It is probably overkill, since it was part of a forced air furnace for a 1500 sq ft house. However it was free and works fine, so I will probably use it somehow.






Subject: Greenhouse using recycled materials Replies: 3
Posted By: paulandirene Views: 781
 
I'm building a greenhouse using recycled materials
The local Habitat for Humanity's "Re-Store" had some 80"x36" double pane glass in aluminum frames that were sliding glass door panels, and I had some leftover from a remodeling job a few years ago. I have a tall south-facing concrete block wall, so it can be a lean to. [I'll probably need more roof angle but I'll modify the drawing....first attempt at using Google SketchUp....at another time.]




Attached Images
png gh01.png (23.74 KB, 116 views)


Subject: What figs don't do well in the South and why Replies: 16
Posted By: paulandirene Views: 1,363
 
cbalducc, I have a Desert King here in Albuquerque NM, and it thrives...even against a very tall south-facing concrete block wall.

Maybe the literature tried to state that Desert King doesn't 'need' high heat rather than it doesn't 'like' high heat.

Subject: Figs on the Point (Loma) Replies: 6
Posted By: paulandirene Views: 897
 

I was born in Ocean Beach [the western side of Point Loma], and was there over the holidays. I saw a few interesting fig trees on Sunset Cliffs Blvd...I was very tempted to gather some cuttings....maybe next time I will [asking first, of course].


Subject: ah, snow.... Replies: 20
Posted By: paulandirene Views: 1,332
 
There's snow at the Mauna Kea Observatory on the island of Hawaii [but since it's at ~14000 feet, it's common]


http://www.vlba.nrao.edu/sites/SITECAM/MKcam.shtml

Subject: Proposed swap: My home-cured olives for cuttings Replies: 25
Posted By: paulandirene Views: 1,466
 
Hi folks, reopening this thread instead of starting a new one.

I have a few jars of this year's home-cured olives [not the amount shown in the picture, my family would freak if I traded them all away]  that I'd be willing to swap for cuttings. I have mailed them via Priority Mail Flat Rate to places all over the US, which has worked well. Please send me a private message if interested.  Thanks.





Subject: Trader review Replies: 12
Posted By: paulandirene Views: 1,003
 
I got fig cuttings last year from Sue Vanderveen [svanessa], but due to family emergencies that occured shortly after I got them, and associated ongoing duties afterwards, I wasn't able to devote the time to do anything with them until very recently.

Despite the time that has passed [they were stored in the fridge], almost all are faithfully coming to life as we speak! To me, that just shows the quality of the cuttings that she sent to me! Thanks Sue!

Subject: Fig Tree in Normandy near D Day beaches Replies: 8
Posted By: paulandirene Views: 1,036
 
I wish I had!  Since Irene speaks French, we probably could have.

Subject: Fig Tree in Normandy near D Day beaches Replies: 8
Posted By: paulandirene Views: 1,036
 
Irene and I visited Normandy in 2007. When we visited Arromanches-les-Bains, site of the "mulberry" artificial harbor used to bring supplies ashore, I saw a nice healthy fig tree in the front yard of a home, that was located around the curve from where we parked.

With the improvements of satellite photography since then, I think I have found the tree.

GPS: 49.338914,-0.620798


Subject: Merry Christmas to all Replies: 36
Posted By: paulandirene Views: 1,499
 
Palm Springs Airport has wifi, so I am able to send this

Merry Christmas everyone!



Subject: What else do you grow? Replies: 106
Posted By: paulandirene Views: 9,150
 
Crandall blackcurrant
Newtown Pippin apple
Hauer Pippin apple
Arkansas Black apple
Wonderful pomegranate
Thompson Seedless grapes
Pecan tree dug out of my father in law's yard
Stella cherry [didn't thrive, removed it a few months ago]
Lilacs, chinese pistache, green ash
Russian Willow, grown from a off of the tree that my great-great grandfather planted in Montana in the 1880s


Subject: Air-Layering - when to cut? Replies: 3
Posted By: paulandirene Views: 1,142
 
Thanks Jon. Right now it is sitting in my father's workshop. I carefully removed it from the distilled water clamshell I made for it. I will bring it home tomorrow.

When you said to put it in a greenhouse...is that for warmth or for moisture-retention? I was thinking of putting it in an unheated room in the house [which stays in the mid 50s]. Do I need to put a greenhouse type covering over it to retain heat and/or moisture?

Subject: Air-Layering - when to cut? Replies: 3
Posted By: paulandirene Views: 1,142
 
Hi, a few months ago, at my father's house in San Diego, I tried my hand at air-layering. Well, I can now see that the roots seem to have grown well. 

I am trying to decide when to cut it away from the branch and bring it back to Albuquerque

About a month ago, someone helped my dad work in his yard and pruned the fig tree, so there is unseasonably new growth [thankfully it has been covered with tinfoil]. I am wondering if I cut the branch now, will it have less vigor in the spring because it's not totally dormant? And...if I brought it back to ABQ would I keep it wrapped or would I put it in a pot?

I know air-layering is done in the growing season, so I am not totally sure how to proceed.

Thanks for your advice

Attached Images
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Subject: Proposed swap: My home-cured olives for cuttings Replies: 25
Posted By: paulandirene Views: 1,466
 
Hi Folks
I put together a youtube clip on olive curing, but it's really just a bunch of MS Powerpoint slides.  I havn't have the time [due to family issues] to go through and analyze how long to display each screen, and will have to get back to that later. However, it might be helpful

Pau






Subject: Proposed swap: My home-cured olives for cuttings Replies: 25
Posted By: paulandirene Views: 1,466
 
Hi Folks,

Some family emergencies have pulled my time and focus away from this forum, but I hope to return again soon. I was able to send one person some olives and will be sending them to one other person too. Wish I had more olives and time available to accommodate everyone

However, this autumn I will be getting another batch of olives to cure, and will be up for swaps in the spring!

Subject: Proposed swap: My home-cured olives for cuttings Replies: 25
Posted By: paulandirene Views: 1,466
 
Excellent Sue. Unfortunately all the people we knew who grew olives in the SD area have passed on. I remember people saying that Picholine is another great olive...excellent for both oil and eating.

I found some info about another grower, I see Kalamata, but I didn't see Niçoise or Lucques listed.

http://www.growquest.com/


Subject: Proposed swap: My home-cured olives for cuttings Replies: 25
Posted By: paulandirene Views: 1,466
 
Sue and Bass, thanks for the responses...I just sent you private messages.

Sue, I love Niçoise olives. Since they are small, I am not sure how they are cured [not using my 'split' method], but I'll try to search for some information.

Have you ever had Lucques olives? Almost buttery tasting, I think they're incredible.

I found a seller of olive trees that stocks Lucques and Niçoise [also called Cailletier] trees

http://www.santacruzolive.com/varietals.asp?v=luques

http://www.santacruzolive.com/varietals.asp?v=cailletier

Subject: Proposed swap: My home-cured olives for cuttings Replies: 25
Posted By: paulandirene Views: 1,466
 

Hi,

One of my  hobbies is curing Mediterranean-style olives, something that goes back some generations in my family.

I was thinking that since I am cuttings-poor but olives-rich [well, at least at the beginning of the autumn curing season], I'd contemplate offering to trade home-cured olives for cuttings [next spring].

I cure both green and black olives....green olives in a salt brine [no lye] and black olives in rock salt [which draws out moisture..shriveling the olives and  concentrating the flavor]. It's a labor-intensive yet gratifying process to change something from inedible to delicious.

As a first choice, I would consider swaps in the greater Albuquerque, NM area [where I live], and the greater San Diego, CA area [where I am from and return fairly frequently]....because it would avoid mailing costs [a jar of olives weighs at least as much as a brick].

However, this isn't to say I wouldn't consider swaps with people from all over the country [I am not sure it would be possible to send to Canada]. It would just take some extra planning and determining what would be an equitable trade that both parties could feel good about.

As far as the quality of the product...I recently brought some to the house of a neighbor to watch a soccer game. The guests included two Spaniards [one from Extremadura and one from Andalucia] and an Egyptian.  All said the olives were great.  Also, I brought some to Mallorca for Montserrat Pons and his colleagues, and the response was equally positive.

Therefore, if anyone might be interested in this, please send me a private message.











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jpeg olives.jpg (479.58 KB, 38 views)


Subject: Vermicompost [worm castings] harvester for fertilizer Replies: 5
Posted By: paulandirene Views: 969
 
I am not sure if any of you use worms to eat your garbage and supply castings for fertilizer, but if you do [or have thought about it], over the weekend I designed a cheap, easily made tool for harvesting the castings...and I had all materials on hand at home: snack foods container, 1/4" mesh, and wire.


Attached Images
jpeg pauls_vermicompost-harvester.jpg (492.90 KB, 191 views)


Subject: Go USA Go! Replies: 29
Posted By: paulandirene Views: 1,547
 
I know why Spain won...my dad made paella when he and my mom visited us last month... a good omen!



Subject: You Cover Your Figs I Cover???????? Replies: 19
Posted By: paulandirene Views: 1,737
 
I have a typical desert soil of decomposed granite with very little organic matter, When dry it's hard as a brick. However over the years, each winter, I have turned into it 'barn sweepings' [manure and sawdust] gotten for free from a local horse stable, which has made a real difference. I am fortunate I don't have the West Side's sand, or in some places in the Valley, mostly clay. 

Subject: Negronne Breba Replies: 8
Posted By: paulandirene Views: 1,276
 
Wow, looks incredible!

Subject: Go USA Go! Replies: 29
Posted By: paulandirene Views: 1,547
 
I put this here rather than start a new thread.

This picture might suggest who I want to win the World Cup

"Arriba España!" translates to "Up [and at 'em], Spain!"

The dish is called Tortilla Espanola. It's a potato and egg omelet, fried in olive oil, that is eaten all over Spain. It looks like a quiche but is totally differen The picture was taken about a year ago [I just added the caption]. Since part of the surface looked like eyes, I cut the wedge away so it would look sort of like Pac Man




Arriba España!!

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jpeg arriba.jpg (115.81 KB, 181 views)


Subject: Fig Plant Are Drinking Replies: 14
Posted By: paulandirene Views: 974
 
Sal, you're right. We take so much for granted, which will indeed bite us.

Scarce [and prudent use of] water has been a factor in the US too. My dad grew up in Santa Barbara CA, which has about the same annual rainfall as Siracusa, Sicily.  The home [built by my grandfather] didn't have piped-in water for years. My grandfather designed it so the rainwater was funneled through sand and charcoal filters and deposited in a cistern beneath the house. A chain-and-bucket mechanism was used to lift the water into the house.  Any other structure on the property having a roof...shed, workshop, stable...had gutters and drainage systems that directed the rainwater into the orchard or vegetable gardens. My grandfather was determined than not a drop of rain go to waste.  

The house roof also held a glass-covered box filled with black-painted pipes...you guessed it, a solar water heater. According to Dad, they were quite popular before the distribution of natural gas [and of course, electricity] made tank-type water heaters feasible.

Our visits to my grandparents' must have sunk in, because my parents, brothers and I all have rain barrels or other methods for collecting and distributing rainwater.  I distinctly remembering that every night, my mom would fill a container with warm water downstairs and carry it up to their bathroom so she could wash her face....because she hated seeing all that water go down the drain before the water got warm. Likewise we had a bucket in the shower for the same purpose....so the first to shower could capture the water until it got warm.

When we bought our home, I set up a rainwater catchment system with rain barrels. Our neighbors thought it was wierd. Now, it's more fashionable, so they all have them! :-) 




Subject: Fancy irrigation box cover Replies: 7
Posted By: paulandirene Views: 717
 
Happiness is being able to make ice cream using ingredients that came out of one's own yard [in this case, black currants]




Attached Images
jpeg blackcurrant_ice_cream.jpg (228.91 KB, 82 views)


Subject: Fancy irrigation box cover Replies: 7
Posted By: paulandirene Views: 717
 

Hi folks, thanks for the comments

Martin, I'll continue to post pictures. John, you are right...the climate here [central New Mexico] could definitely be as foreign as the moon to you. Shade can be a precious commodity here. Tim, ironically, not very many cacti can grow here because it gets too cold in winter [below freezing nearly 100 nights/year].

Our home faces south, and shows a rather stern face to the general public....a rock garden with cacti, succulents, and one shade tree....all very drought-tolerant [and now drip-irrigated].

However, it is in the privacy of the back yard that our home displays its soft and tender heart [although, to the occasional chagrin of my Midwest born-and-raised spouse, without any lawn]. There are black current bushes, lilacs, a pecan tree [a seedling dug out of my father in law's yard some years back], three apple trees, and three in-ground fig trees [against a tall southfacing wall]...all quite drought-tolerant...as well as drip-irrigated tomatoes and other vegetables. And, the blazing heat radiating off of the western wall is now greatly tempered by the shade of a walk-under grape trellis. 

Sites like Figs4Fun are filled with people who give me inspiration, and I hope I can do the same in return.


Subject: Fancy irrigation box cover Replies: 7
Posted By: paulandirene Views: 717
 
Hi Folks,

I have a xeriscaped front yard, and recently installed a drip irrigation system. The valves stuck out like a sore thumb, so I scrounged my garage and yard for materials to make a cover. I had 2x4s, plywood strips, and some cement backerboard...so really all I needed to do was buy some tile, which with the design piece in the front, cost less than $20.

Well, it looked too much like a seat, so to discourage people sitting on it [and thus breaking the removeable tile top], using silicon seal, I attached items I have picked up on beaches....coral from Baja California, Mexico; sea glass from Vancouver Island, BC Canada; and beach pebbles from central California, Spain, Scotland, and France [D-Day invasion beaches Utah and Omaha].

How does this relate to figs? I plan to make another box for my backyard plantings....which includes my fig trees. :-)








 

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