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Subject: i need to take sucker off my trees Replies: 5
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 591
 
I'm with Dan on this.  If it is hot and/or dry in your area right now is not a good time to remove these because environmental stress will make the transplant much harder on the new tree.

As far as how close to cut, get as much root as you can with the new plant, but not so close you damage the mother plant.

Figs are like tomatoes in that they will root any where along the stem if covered with soil.

In the Summer and Fall, I often just bury low lying branches with dirt, or pin them down with a small U shape of wire if necessary, cover well with dirt, and then separate them out in the early Spring for transplant.  If you have hard winters in your area maybe you might want to separate them out for transplant to pots in late Fall.

When it is this hot, it is good for ripening and picking figs but nothing else.

Best wishes to all.

John

Subject: LSU Purple Power! Replies: 54
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 5,836
 
The LSU Purples are even BETTER this year!

Maybe it is because we have had very hot weather, but the flavor is remarkable, amazing flavor.

I had a bunch of them picked today.  I thought about taking a few to the neighbors, but then I ate them all!  ;-)

I will take the neigbhors some BTs!

Best wishes to all.

John

Subject: Ronde De Bourdeaux Replies: 4
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 710
 
Great pictures Dan.  Thanks.

I thoroughly read and copied Herman's recommendations on how many figs to leave on the fig tree based on the age of the plant.

But what I am not sure about is how and when to remove the excess figs.

Should I go with leaving only the oldest/largest figlets up to the designated number, and then remove all the subsequent newest/smallest through frost? 

That would make sense I would think, and that way the remaining figs should ripen well before frost.

Or should I just do nothing till sometime (a month; a few weeks?) before frost and then remove all green figs at once?

And does it hurt the tree to leak sap when figs are removed?  Should I use clippers, pinch them off?

I would greatly appreciate your suggestions on this.

Hope you are well my friend.

John


Subject: Fig Trees and Deer Replies: 7
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 5,450
 
This proves it: Racoons are pure evil.

Subject: Fig Orchard Irrigation pics Replies: 27
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 2,701
 
What a fantastic setup Dennis.

This will be your own little Paradise.

Congratulations and enjoy.

Best wishes.

John

Subject: Fig Trees and Deer Replies: 7
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 5,450
 
Racoons are a terrible menace.

I would rather have the deer.

And you are probably right Dave.

Best wishes.

John

Subject: Kinda of large!!! Replies: 9
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 871
 
Do you know whether this is the breba (over wintered on last year's wood) or this seasons main crop (on new wood)?

Breba's tend to be larger.

What did the inside look like?  Same color, lighter, darker?

If this was a breba and it was an 8, you might want to sit down when you taste the main crop!

Best wishes.

John

North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Fig Trees and Deer Replies: 7
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 5,450
 
The deer are so awful here that I quite literally have to chase them out of the orchard.  Soon, I expect they will begin trying to eat the groceries as we take them from the car to the house.

But other than a crazy buck attacking a small bare fig tree last fall (he likely thought it was another buck because of the antler like shape of the branches; I said he was crazy), we have never had deer eating the figs.

I suspect they don't like either the smell of the figs or the latex from the leaves and stems.

You are safe with the figs.



Subject: Black Bethlehem Replies: 26
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 7,178
 
Hi JD.  My Black Bethlehem is a strong grower too, as is the Mavra Sika from Bass.

Great finds by Bass, and terrific editions to any fig collection.

Best wishes to all.

John


Subject: Letdown ... another BT Replies: 4
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 911
 
Hi Jason.

Don't feel like the Lone-Ranger my friend.

Last summer I got mega-excited about a family heirloom fig from "Lebanon."

Turned out to be .  . . a Brown Turkey!

They were exactly like yours, including the semi-open eye, hollow center and mold problem.

The good ones made fantastic preserves, but not something I would give orchard space to, or ever propogate.

Nonetheless, you keep up the search . . . because the NEXT one is going to be gold!  ;-)

Actually, I am watching a fig in the area with an unusual leaf, so we will see what it is.

Take care good friend.

John

North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: News report Replies: 6
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 681
 
Hi Ken.  Yet another reason I am happy to be driving an old but realiable 98 Honda Civic.

It comes pre-scratched and dented so I have no fear of peacock attacks.

We picked the first main-crop figs last night.  The Celeste beat the Georgia White Hybrid this year, but only by a few days.

Hope you are well my friend.

Best wishes.

John

Subject: News report Replies: 6
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 681
 
Last summer we had an insane cardinal that spent all day attacking his reflection in the car's side mirror.

He is gone now. 

Probably part of natural selection, as spending all your time attacking yourself in the mirror is not a good survival strategy.

Best wishes to all.

John

Subject: Fig Tea Replies: 18
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,809
 
We used to live in Amish Country in Indiana, and the Amish believe that for every human illness God provided us a plant to help us.

Herbal remedies offer tremendous health benefits without the side-effects of prescription drugs.  We take no prescription drugs, using only natural, herbal and homeopathic treatments and they work very well for us.

Natural remedies tend to work with your body, making you healthier, while many prescription drugs attack the illness, but attack your body also, giving you harmful side-effects.

A friend of mine was taking "Lipitor" to reduce cholestroral, and it nearly killed him by damaging his heart and lung muscles.  He is now taking natural herbs to reduce his cholestroral with good results.

The fig tea is worth a try, and at worst it's like my Mom used to say about chicken soup: "Even if it doesn't help; it couldn't hurt."

I hope that you will have good results from trying the fig tea.  Be patient, it may take some time to see results, and either way, it couldn't hurt.

Best wishes to all.

John





Subject: Fig Tea Replies: 18
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,809
 
Male pattern baldness is tough a problem to remedy, but anything is worth a try.

And in the interest of science, someone needs to try the fig tea for a different but all too common male age-related problem.

Not sure whether drinking the tea or applying it directly would be more effective for this problem, but if you try to the direct application method, be sure and let the tea cool first.  ;-)

Best wishes to all.

John


Subject: Fig Tea Replies: 18
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,809
 
Hi Gene.  Thanks for sharing this great idea!

Hope you are doing well.

Best wishes.

John

North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: a disturbing fig video Replies: 58
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 2,765
 
Hi Martin.  That is very funny!  ;-)

Hope you are well my friend.

Best wishes.

John

Subject: a disturbing fig video Replies: 58
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 2,765
 
I only liked one part of it (you can guess what part).

But as to the rest, those guys should really consider seeing a counselor.

Subject: Help, My fig trees are lime green! Replies: 17
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 2,656
 
Jason is correct.  I thought the same thing (about the lime green leaves), but I observed them over time and they darkened up as the leaves matured.

Give it a little time.  It's probably no emergency, and if the plant starts looking worse more aggressive intervention can be used if needed, but remember the Hipocratic Oath: "First do no harm."

Most conditions with plants, animals, and humans are self-limiting and will self-correct over time, and you want to be careful you don't make things worse with too much chemical amendments.  Go slow if you use them, as you can add more but you can't take it out.

Subject: can someone tell me what these are? Replies: 12
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,001
 
I'm guessing latex too.

The deer (we are plagued by deer) thankfully don't eat our figs, but it's been so hot a dry a few of them have nibbled at the new leaves, then you get little white spots like this.

Hopefully the taste of the latex will teach the local deer to leave the figs alone.

Best wishes.

John


Subject: My heart was warmed this morning. Replies: 18
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,035
 
We keep the M.E.O.W. unit in the garage at night because of the coyotes.

That way she gets a safe, good nights sleep, and then she is ready to rid the area of rodents the next day.

She also chases away snakes (I only saw her run off one actually; a large rat snake; but I am assuming there are others because she seems busy doing something all day), for which I am personally VERY grateful!

My wife does like the mice, but I am even more creeped out by the snakes.

The hawks keep the snake numbers down too.

Best wishes to all.

John

Subject: My heart was warmed this morning. Replies: 18
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,035
 
Last summer we had a mess with rodents in the garden.  They ate half of our beets and my wife was afraid to go in the garden because of the little beasts running here and there.

And then we got a Mouse Elimination Optimizing Weapon, or M.E.O.W.

Rodent problem solved.  I haven't seen one in the garden since.

We also have some Redtail Hawks in the area too.  One sits on the garden gate every once in a while.

Attached Images
jpeg Close_up_2010.jpg (361.94 KB, 19 views)


Subject: Raintree Nursery Replies: 7
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,051
 
Hi Dominick.  Hope you are doing well my friend.

I have bought several varieties of figs from Raintree, and lots of other plants and trees as well.  In my experience they are one of the better online nurseries, consistently delivering healthy plants.

We have a VDB from Raintree, and it has definately been a strong grower.

Is anyone else growing the VDB from Raintree?  Is it a true VDB?  As good as the one from Edible Landscape?

I would be very interested in hearing about other's experiences with the Raintree figs.  We also have the Tashkent, Texas Blue Giant, and Stella.

Best wishes to all.

John

Subject: Grape Kool-Aid Replies: 14
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,261
 

The birds found out how terrible artificial sweeteners and artificial food coloring is for their health.


Subject: Vista Replies: 55
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 6,588
 
Two words Dennis: GORILLA GARDENING!

;-)

Subject: White Adriatic Replies: 27
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 2,178
 
Hi Jon.  Those do look great.

And as I recall, you are not generally a huge fan of brebas, so this is high praise indeed.

I learned a valuable lesson today concerning brebas: PICK NO BREBA BEFORE ITS TIME!

I picked two brebas today from our Georgia White Hybrid (unknown origin).

The first one looked great, but didn't taste that great.

The second didn't look very good, but tasted GREAT! It was much more ripe than the first one.

From now on, I will know that beauty is only skin deep on the brebas, and the older less beautiful one (starting to crack and fully ripe) is far better.

Best wishes to all.

John


Subject: Vista Replies: 55
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 6,588
 
Hi Ed.  Jon said previously that he acquired a fig labeled "Vista Black Mission" but DNA testing at USDA/UC Davis proved it to be a VDB.

So the Vista was a VDB.

The performance and flavor of this fig is said to be outstanding, a real winner.

Hope you are doing well my friend.

John

Subject: OT: Picture of red moon caused by Arizona Forest fires Replies: 7
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 734
 
I agree Noss.  That picture is beautiful, a work of art.

Maybe it also reminds us that beautiful and good things can sometimes come from bad events.

Best wishes to all.

John

Subject: The Plunge Replies: 10
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,699
 
We have a Lattorolla from Ed also.  It is in ground and growing great.

You will be very happy with this fig.

Best wishes.

John

Subject: Info on English Brown Turkey? Replies: 12
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,143
 
We got our EBT from Herman, and NO ONE knows their figs like Herman, so you can be sure it is a true EBT.

Best wishes to all.

John


Subject: Info on English Brown Turkey? Replies: 12
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,143
 
Hi Ruben.  I am growing an English Brown Turkey.  I could take a picture, but so far it's just leaves and a few branches about 2 feet high.

I would say though, that it is a very strong grower and that it is branching out nicely already.

No doubt others have much more information, pictures of fruit, etc., but it is doing great as a young plant.

Best wishes.

John


Subject: Taking safe food supply for granted Replies: 4
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 658
 
We had our soil tested before we bought the property, and we are very careful about what we bring onto the property.  We use no animal fertilizers, only sea products (kelp meal; fish meal; etc.) that have also been tested for toxins.

Still, for almost everyone, you can be sure that what you grow yourself is going to be a lot cleaner and safer than what you get from the store.  Better the devil you know than the one you don't.

We have a 2,000 square foot deer fenced garden in which we grow vegetables year-round.  In summer its mostly tomatoes, potatoes, corn, beans, peppers and herbs; and fall and spring we cabbage, carrots, lettuce, beets, and other cooler weather crops.  With the fruit orchard (apples; pears; grapes; berries of all sorts; cherries; persimmons; jujube; plums; pawpaws), we grow at least 50% of what we eat.

We are thinking about getting some chickens, but just for eggs.

I've noticed that some of our neighbors are also starting gardens.

No matter what your circumstances, try to become a little more self-sufficient, even if it's just growing some sprouts inside, and a few figs and tomatoes outside in pots.  It is rewarding is so many ways from savings to health.

Best wishes to all.

John


Subject: Violette de Bordeaux Breba Replies: 4
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 729
 
Hi Joe.  Having a fresh fig now sounds like heaven.

Here in Zone 7, it's going to be a little longer, but I have a couple White Hybrids really starting to size up now, so soon.

We have a VDB from Raintree Nursery, and they are good.

But has anybody tried both the Raintree and the Edible Landscape VDBs?

As I recall, people say they are different, and that maybe the EL one is better?

Best wishes to all.

John


Subject: Green Greek Fig pics Replies: 14
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 3,599
 
Thanks Dennis.  I got a little nervous when I read the description, but this is very good to know.

It may very well be true to type after all.

And I also remember our good friend Herman once saying (I am paraphrasing) that in the end name is less important than taste, and this looks like a great fig.

I am still learning, and greatly appreciate your help Herman and Dennis.

Very best wishes to all.

John 

Subject: Need ideas Replies: 11
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 882
 
Hi Lou:

1) Get a time-machine;

2) Go back 2 months ago, to when the tree was still dormant.

Just kidding!  ;-)

Cecil and Dennis have good suggestions.

My serious suggestion is this though: Be careful you don't hurt yourself moving something this heavy.  Get some help if you can.

In better or worse condition, it will make it, and you will have a great tree.

Best wishes.

John


Subject: BURNING SWEET Marseilles - pics Replies: 15
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,513
 
Hi Herman.

It is said that: "Success has many fathers; while failure is an orphan."

A very successful fig like this is no doubt going to have many people claiming that they are responsible for its origins.

I also associate figs with the Garden of Eden, and this is in large part why I love them so much. 

Since humans had to leave, I think we are all trying to get back to the Garden.  The figs give us a little window on Paradise.

Take care good friend, and best wishes to all.

John


Subject: Green Greek Fig pics Replies: 14
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 3,599
 
Thank you Herman.

It was just an impulse buy.

But I think maybe I will just give it to a friend who is planting a new orchard here.  I ask him if he wanted a fig tree.  He said yes, so I said "what kind would you like?", and he said "just one with figs!"

So this one will have figs, and I will give it to him.

But I only want to grow varieties that are true to type, and it is no hurry, I will keep looking for a true Green Greek.

I know better, but sometimes it is very tempting to buy something.

Hope you are well my friend.

John


Subject: Green Greek Fig pics Replies: 14
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 3,599
 
Hi everyone.

I ordered a Green Greek from here:

http://cgi.ebay.com/GREEN-GREEK-FIG-ROOTED-PLANT-SHIPPED-ITS-POT-/150611275153?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item231121ad91

Does anyone know whether this is the real deal?

Thanks.

John


Subject: BURNING SWEET Marseilles - pics Replies: 15
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,513
 
Hi Herman.  Every time I read one of your post I learn something!

I have been wanting to get a Marseilles White for years, and I keep thinking "where can I get a Marseilles White" (from a reliable source of course; because too many are just whatever they send), and then I learn that the Marseilles White is a.k.a. "Italian Honey" and I have one of those growing in the orchard already!  From you!  ;-)

So this is very good news.  It is tough to see such a great fig without getting "fig envy" but this is the perfect cure for fig envy!

The Italian Honey is growing very well and should have a few fruits this year.

Great pictures Dennis.  Thank you for sharing these.

Best wishes to all.

John


Subject: Green Greek Fig pics Replies: 14
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 3,599
 
Thanks Ruben.  It looks very healthy.  Thanks for the information.  I will transition it slowly to outside and full sun.

Hope you are having a great summer.

Best wishes.

John

Subject: Green Greek Fig pics Replies: 14
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 3,599
 
Hi Dennis.  Do you remember where you got this from?

There are some listed on Ebay from a nursery in Florida.

Hope you are well my friend.

John

Subject: Seeking Paradise Replies: 18
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,090
 
Why do we spend so much time, money and sweat working on our figs?

It's our own little private piece of Paradise, a personal window back to the Garden of Eden.

I feel a sense of peace in the fig orchard I find no where else.

Thanks to all my friends here who have helped me to get started with this great hobby.

The figs are amazing, but even better is the fun.

I took this picture this morning of pomegranates blooming in the fig bed.

Very best wishes to all.

John

Attached Images
jpeg Pomegranate_and_Fig.jpg (589.05 KB, 90 views)


Subject: summer cuttings Replies: 16
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,214
 
Hi Jason.  Hope you are well my friend.

I rooted cuttings straight from a tree that was fruiting last summer, and they were fine.

Best wishes to all.

John


Subject: I finally figured it Why figs with FMV,from Ca Collection,don't want to grow on East Coast. Replies: 26
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 2,847
 
Hi Herman.  A brilliant theory my friend, and this makes perfect sense.

Although it would be ideal to mix in the lime, for figs that are already in ground, what do you think of a top dressing of lime?

I greatly appreciate your sharing this.  It will be very helpful.

Very best wishes.

John


Subject: Adding Limestone Replies: 8
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,088
 
Hi JD.  Hope you are well my friend.

First, I don't have an answer unfortunately, but I appreciate the question.  I have been wondering the same thing.

Figs have been grown for thousands of years, and given that, it's amazing how little has been written about growing figs.

It's easy to learn that blueberries like an acid soil; beets like a lot of lime, but what is best for figs?

I hope someone can help with this, as if lime is good for the figs, that is an easy thing to do.

As far as I know too, lime is just lime, although in different forms it may be absorbed quicker when ground finer, etc.

But unfortunately I have more questions than answers about this subject, and look forward to hearing from others.

Best wishes.

John


Subject: Origin of Hardy Chicago Type Figs Replies: 11
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 2,157
 
Hi Joe.  Everything we "know" is defined by probabilties of certianty.

Are the people we believe to be our anscesters our real ancesters?  Probably, but there is alway a degree of uncertainty.  The lineage of figs has the same problem.  These things quickly become clouded and confused over time.

Our HC produces relatively large fruit, and has a very upright growing habit.

So is it really an HC?  Are the HCs really from Sicily?

You can find more evidence to increase your certainty, but you never get to absolute certainty. 

For example, someone could have planted a fig from Naples in Sicily, or someone could have planted a fig from Sicily in Naples.

When the fig is brought to the U.S. is the fig really from Naples or from Siciliy?

Also, I know a LOT of Italians from Sicily.  You know a lot from Naples maybe.  But that doesn't mean the HC came from either location.  All you needed was one person bringing one fig, not millions of immigrants from anywhere.

In the end, is it a good fig?  That is the question.  And that is what matters.

The history does make it much more fun though, but even when someones tells us the real "truth" it will be more or less the reality depending on the evidence available, but you never get to 100% certainty.  There is always an element of faith required to believe any story, and for most people, the fig will be from where they believe it is from in the end. 

That doesn't mean that there isn't truth.  There is.  It's just that we rarely ever have enough unquestionable evidence to get there with absolute certainty.

A very interesting question though.  And hopefully we can learn more about this great fig.

Best wishes my friend.

John

Subject: How Can You Tell if a Clipping is Viable? Replies: 7
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 862
 
Hi Bob, and welcome to the Forum.

What I do is this: Use your thumb nail to carefully scratch a tiny area away from the surface of the cutting.

If you can find some green there is hope, if you can't it's a goner.

Moldy or shiveled is obviously bad news too, but if you can find some green just under the surface of the bark there is hope.

The BT is a good variety to start with though.  To quote Jason from an earlier post: "Brown Turkeys will root in gasoline" (he is being emphatic; don't really try this anyone!).  ;-)

Best wishes.

John

Subject: Today pixes of fig cultivars left without protection,last winter! Replies: 9
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,187
 
Thanks for sharing these great pictures Herman.

And those are clearly some very tough trees, surviving so well down to zero unprotected!

I think I need to be more aggressive in pruning.  Your trees will probably produce more fruit and less folage with this strong pruning back.  And it may also help with cold hardiness.  It is always the highest branches that get hit the hardest by the cold on a larger tree, so maybe it is good to just prune back hard in the late Fall.

Hope you are doing well my friend.

John

Subject: Pre-Fig Fruit Season Replies: 20
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,260
 
Hi Ken.  It's actually easily kept as about a 6 foot bush with a little annual pruning off the top.  They do have some large thorns here and there though.  But I just pull them off as I see them so the kids don't get into them and that works fine.

It's a great plant, especially given the very early fruiting.

And hi Noss, Gene, and Ruben.  As I recall the Goumi comes from Eastern Asia (Russia and China) and is very cold hardy, but I'm not sure how far South it goes.  Some cold hardy plants are just tough in general and do fine in the heat too.  This one is very drought tolerant and it is a nitrogen fixer as well so you don't have to fertilize it.

It makes good jelly and pies.  Not as good as real cherries, but still good, and we haven't had much luck with real cherries here, so this is a good substitute.

I just saw that the first black raspberry is starting to ripen.  We are far enough North we can grow black raspberries very well here, and the red ones too.

Hope everyone is enjoying the great weather.

Best wishes to all.

John


Subject: Pre-Fig Fruit Season Replies: 20
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,260
 
Hi Ruben.  We like the Goumis.  They don't taste quite like true cherries, but they are very good when fully ripe.  A little astringent if like too soon, but at full ripeness they have a very pleasant balance of tartness and sweetness.  They are also said to be very healthy.

Best wishes.

John

Subject: Pre-Fig Fruit Season Replies: 20
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,260
 
Hi Jon.  We have really enjoyed the Illinois Everbearing, and they do seem to be everbearing.  They have a very heavy set of fruit right now and then more or less throughout the growing season.

I really like the flavor and so do the kids.  I grew up eating wild mulberries around the Great Lakes, but this selected variety is far better in taste.

As I recall, mulberries and figs are related plants.

Hope you are well my friend.

John

 

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