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Subject: Pre-Fig Fruit Season Replies: 20
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,260
 
Hi everyone.  While we are waiting for the main crops of figs, we also have some earlier fruit in our orchard.

The first to ripen every year is the Goumi, followed by Illinois Everbearing Mulberries (actually very good; with a good berry flavor), raspberries, blueberries, and then the figs start ripening.

The Goumi started ripening last week, and I took these pictures this morning.

Best wishes to all.

John

North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Attached Images
jpeg Goumi_5-8-11.jpg (910.37 KB, 56 views)
jpeg Red_Gem_Goumi_5-8-11.jpg (596.70 KB, 42 views)


Subject: Scorched Alma too much, too soon Replies: 1
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 645
 
Hi C.H.  I had the same thing happen.  With the fig hedge, I was transplanting a lot of figs from inside then to outside part-shade area pots and shaded in ground cutting beds to full sun in the fig hedge.  Most of them did fine, but a few had sunburn.

I'm hoping they will bounce back though, and they probably will.

Best wishes.

John

North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: "Dead" King Replies: 10
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,779
 
As Dr. Frankenstein said: "It's Alive!!!"

Much to my surprise, when I went to take out the Desert King, I found a little new growth in the roots and around the bottom of the base.  It sure looked dead, but there was a little life still in it.

It still came out though, as I am now convincing this fig is not ideal for this climate.

Thanks to everyone for your thoughts.

I always find it difficult to take out a fig, but sometimes you have to.  There are too many good varieties available to waste space on those that won't do well in your climate.

Best wishes to all.

John

North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: "Dead" King Replies: 10
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,779
 
Hi Herman and Northeastnewbie.

It sounds like there are much better varieties for here on the East Coast, especially since we are planning to have all of our trees in ground.

This is very helpful, thank you very much.

And now that gives me a spot in the orchard to fill, so this is good news, being able to shop for another new fig, just not another Desert King.

Thank you, and very best wishes to all.

John

Subject: "Dead" King Replies: 10
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,779
 
Hi Dennis.  Were you in Marietta during the drought?  We had trouble keeping anything newly transplanted alive during that time.

Both of the Desert Kings were small size also (one gallon) to start with, that didn't help I am sure.

But it could just be coincidence that both of them died.

I could get the soil tested, but everything else (including over 50 varieties of figs) is growing like a weed, so I'm certain it's not a soil problem or it would effect the other plants, and that is definately not the case.  Quite the contrary.

We probably have some of the best, healthiest soil in North Georgia, as we have spent a ton of money hauling in peat moss and other high quality organic matter to improve the red clay.  We also ordered quite a bit of healthy soil organisms (beneficial fungi and bacteria) from Fungi Perfecti and also healthy parasitic soil nematodes, all to create healthy soil life.  It seems to be working great, some I'm sure our soil is good.

I probably just got unlucky twice.  They say lighting never strikes twice, but I know that is not true either.

What do you think of the flavor and productivity of your Desert Kings Dennis?

Also, I was still thinking about that great setup you have, and now with the new underground watering system you going to install.  Outstanding and impressive.

Hope you are well my friend.

John

North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: "Dead" King Replies: 10
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,779
 
Hi Northeastnewbie, and thanks for your reply.

What do you think about the quality of the fruit?

What I am wondering is whether I should order yet another Desert King (Raintree Nursury sells them), or whether there are better varieties and it's not worth the effort given the cost/benefit.

If Desert Kings are great figs (great taste; productive; etc.) it would be worthwhile, but if there are better varieties I might just use the space for a different variety.

Wouldn't be great if you could taste the fig first, and then decide which ones you want to grow?

So that's why I was wondering what everyone thought about the Desert King.

All of our figs are in ground, and we are Zone 7 also, so that might explain the two "Dead" Kings, given Herman's advice on this.  It may be too cold here in North Georgia for this variety, in which case, I will definately try another variety.

Thank you my friend.

Best wishes.

John

North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: "Dead" King Replies: 10
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,779
 
Hi everyone.

I have planted two "Desert King" figs now, and both of them have died.

Both had good care, so do you think it's the climate here (hot and humid) or just bad luck?

Is this fig variety worth a third try?

Best wishes to all.

John

North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b


Subject: Fig Orchard complete....well almost Replies: 55
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 4,307
 
OMG!  This is an intervention Dennis:

Please . . . repeat after me: "My name is Dennis, and I am a fig addict."  ;-)

That is a fantastic collection Dennis, and a very, very impressive set up.

You will have many, many happy years with this.  Lots of fun, and lots of great food to come.  And good health too.

Sorry to hear about the injury though.  Power tools can be dangerous and unpredictable, especially in this rock hard red clay.

I greatly appreciate your sharing this Dennis.  There is clearly a tremendous amount of work here, but the payoff will be even more tremendous.

You are an inspiration my friend.

Best wishes.

John

p.s. Thanks for the tip on removing the Brunswicks Herman.  Another F4F member said the figs he got from "Michigan Fig" turned out to be Brunswicks.  When I first started ordering figs from Ebay, I didn't know anything, so I have a couple of those from MichFig.  I'm going to take them out to be safe, and then their next assignment will be cooking hot dogs.  Better safe than sorry.

Best wishes to all.

John

Subject: ROOTING IN WATER STORAGE BIN Replies: 5
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,036
 
I have been doing alright rooting directly in good quality soil (outside in the summer; in pots inside this winter), about 50-70% success (sometimes 100% success if the variety is easy to root).

I have now rooted two batches of cuttings (mixed varieties) with 100% success.

I just keep the cuttings in glass jars with water covering all but the top inch of so on top of the refrigerator.  I changed the water about every 3 or 4 days or anytime it started to look funky.

This seems to be a very easy and so far very successful method.

I started using this after reading Dominick's post on water rooting.

Our kids also like it because they can easily see what is happening.  I like that too, as in soil it drives you crazy wondering if anything was happening or if you were just wasting time and money.

The water method works for me.

Best wishes to all.

John


Subject: Chickens? Replies: 24
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,632
 
Hi Cathy.  That really is an amazing pet.

Do you have to bring it inside in the winter, and does it hibernate?  What does it eat?

Just curious, and when I show the kids the picture, I'm sure they will ask.  I have seen a few local turtles in our lake, and a box turtle walked through the yard one day, but never anything like that.  Pretty amazing.

Best wishes.

John

Subject: Chickens? Replies: 24
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,632
 
Here's a website on local chicken laws (yes; believe it or not some government officials have found it necessary to regulate a chicken; apparently they have everything else under control and functioning perfectly giving them time to regulate the chicken in your backyard):

http://www.backyardchickens.com/laws/search.php?State=&City=Athens-Clarke+County

Some other useful websites on backyard/urban chickens:

http://urbanchickens.org/

http://home.centurytel.net/thecitychicken/chickenlaws.html



Subject: Chickens? Replies: 24
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,632
 
Great picture Cathy, and a very impressive critter!

I'll bet though that: 1) The chickens are faster; and 2) Their eggs are way better tasting!  ;-)

Best wishes.

John

Subject: Chickens? Replies: 24
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,632
 
Hi Ken.  That sounds like a fantastic idea.

I always love it when you can take a negative (the necessity to fence) and turn it into a positive (free bonus chicken coop!).

Also, free farm fresh organic eggs sure beat swarms of flies and other bugs eating rotting figs that fall to the ground.  The chickens will keep the ground clean and give you free eggs and fertilizer for the figs.

Also, many cities are changing ordinances to allow small numbers of backyard chickens, and if yours doesn't, talk to someone with common sense on the Council and see if they will.  If there is no rooster, there is no noise; small groups (a dozen or less) create no smell; and fresh eggs are great.

We are going to start a small flock as soon as we can.

The next issue of Mother Earth News is going to have plans for building a small "Chicken Tractor" which is a small coop you can easily move around the yard to give the chickens fresh grass and bugs to eat.

Best wishes to all.

John

Subject: Confirming ID for Yellow Unknown Replies: 19
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,900
 
Hi Andre.  Glad to hear that it is doing well, and I hope it will grow as well for you as it has for us here.

Very best wishes.

John


Subject: Confirming ID for Yellow Unknown Replies: 19
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,900
 
Hi Herman.  I greatly appreciate your expertise on this.  I have been trying to identify this unknown white for quite some time, and you have without question been the most helpful with this.

I'm am just guessing, but one good possibility is that it is from the University of Georgia Agricultural Station.  We live very close to there, the students sell plants from there to raise money for their Agricultural Club, and this fig is a very strong, aggressive grower.  It could have been in a test bed near the Celestes they were growing for sale (they sell these twice a year) and the test plant ran into the Celeste bed.  It does this here too (spreading underground into the neighboring bed).  Not invasive, but very aggressive for a fig.

I got it from a small family nursery here, they could have got it from the UGA plant sale (mislabeled), and I bought it because looking down the line of figs they had for sale, this one looked like the healthiest and strongest grower without question, so I choose this one and planted it 10 years ago.

It has been a great fig.  Early (main crop hits by mid-July; brebas look like they will be ripe in several weeks), cold-hardy, no splitting ever, large, and highly productive.  Not quite as tasty as Hardy Chicago (to my taste at least), but still excellent, very sweet and juicy.  Definately one of our favorites.

Hope you are well my friend.

Best wishes to all.

John


Subject: Confirming ID for Yellow Unknown Replies: 19
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,900
 

The brebas on this White Hybrid are growing rapidly, up to the size of a quarter across already.

Attached Images
jpeg White_Hybrid_Breba.jpg (545.97 KB, 68 views)


Subject: Fig Hedge Replies: 54
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 5,500
 

The Fig Hedge is Done!

The figs are planted now, the soaker hose is installed, and the whole thing is covered with several inches of additional mulch.

Not much to look at yet, but in a few months all the figs should be up nicely and I will post a picture.

Best wishes to all.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Attached Images
jpeg Fig_Hedge_Planted_001.JPG (628.89 KB, 176 views)
jpeg Fig_Hedge_Planted_002.JPG (633.81 KB, 136 views)


Subject: Another Locally Found Fig (NJ) Replies: 8
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,211
 
Hi Gorgi.  Great find, cold hardy and very interesting looking.

How is the taste?

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: UCR 135-15s Replies: 9
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,370
 
Hi Dan.  I was very happy to see LSU Gold identified as a winner also.

I jus planted a very nice looking young LSU Gold tree in a prime spot in the new Fig Hedge.  The LSU Purple has been great, and can't wait to try the LSU Gold.

Best wishes to all.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Fig Hedge Replies: 54
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 5,500
 
Thanks Herman.  Very good advice.  This makes sense, and this is what I will do.

I planted about half of the figs today, and hope to finish up soon.

I will keep everyone posted.

Hope you are well my friend.

Very best wishes.

John

John


Subject: Fig Hedge Replies: 54
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 5,500
 
PROJECT UPDATE:

So far I have:

1) Cleared trees
2) Shortened stumps to the ground and innoculated stumps with mushroom spores
3) Rotatilled
4) And liad down a layer of straw, topped with tons of peat moss (a whole palet; 35 large bails); pine bark fines and lime (to balance some of the acidity).

I am going to start planting the figs, and then top it with a nice layer of pine bark mini-nuggets for a nice finished look, and put down a drip irrigation line (the whole hedge is about 150 feet).

Attached Images
jpeg Fig_Hedge_in_progress_April_2011.JPG (680.14 KB, 137 views)


Subject: Experimenting with sowing directly in the ground Replies: 12
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 947
 
Also, the deer never eat the figs.  Just that crazy one attacked one.

The deer would eat everything in the vegetable garden though, if it were not fenced.

Subject: Experimenting with sowing directly in the ground Replies: 12
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 947
 
Hi Sara.  We now have a black pvc coated 7.5 foot chicken wire fence and the deer have never gotten in it (most of the figs are not in the fenced area.

I had the light weight material, and it worked for a while, but during a severe drought the deer were desperate.  So one day I got up and found a "deer shaped hole" in the fence.  I am guessing he went under to get in, eat, then freaked when he couldn't get out and crashed through the plastic netting.

Under normal circumstances though, the light weight netting may work just fine.

Best wishes.

John

Subject: Best fig to go with what cheese? Replies: 10
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 3,655
 

Parmigiano Reggiano is good too.


Subject: Best fig to go with what cheese? Replies: 10
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 3,655
 
Others may have a more detailed answer for you, but I would agree with Cajun chef Justin Wilson who said: "The best wine is one you like to drink."

I do like herbed Feta with figs though.

Subject: Experimenting with sowing directly in the ground Replies: 12
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 947
 
"May the Fence be with you!"  ;-)

http://www.deerfencing.com/?gclid=CIGE95S3jagCFQla7AodvVMHDQ

Subject: Experimenting with sowing directly in the ground Replies: 12
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 947
 
Now THAT'S funny!  ;-)

Hope you are doing well my friend.

John

Subject: Experimenting with sowing directly in the ground Replies: 12
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 947
 

p.s.  By planting "in ground" I mean in a well dug bed topped with several inches of good potting soil.  Planting directly in the poor quality red Georgia clay only would probably not be as successful.


Subject: Experimenting with sowing directly in the ground Replies: 12
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 947
 
Hi Jason.  I have had very good success with rooting directly in the ground, planting in Spring and Summer, 50%-70% depending on variety, etc.

An insane Buck attacked a fig tree in the late Fall (turns out the Buck won that fight; but given the intellect of attacking a fig tree as another Buck, I have my doubts he did as well against a real Buck), and I was left with a pile of broken branches, so I planted them around the base of the fig tree to see if they would root.  So far nothing.

It's of course too soon to draw any final conclusions, but the obvious lesson so far is that figs root in ground fine in warm weather, but in cool soil not quickly and maybe not at all.

Best wishes.

John

Subject: Rodents? Get a M.E.O.W.! Replies: 16
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 780
 
Hi Svanessa.  They really are different in personality.  My brother back in Maine has a cat that would only "guard" his fig tree during the winter when the fig is inside, and only if the fig happened to be sitting next to him when he is sleeping by the fire.

Our cat Meow chased a snake out of our garage just today.  Needless to say, she was very brave and a big hero for this.

I hope people will consider bringing a rescue cat or dog into their family, as these pets are so very happy to have a home and family to love them, and they do a lot for the family too.

Best wishes.

John


Subject: Rodents? Get a M.E.O.W.! Replies: 16
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 780
 
Hi Jason.

Either you have lazy cats; or the rodents are reproducing faster than they are!

Meow really has made a difference here.

Hope you are well my friend.

Best wishes.

John

Subject: Rodents? Get a M.E.O.W.! Replies: 16
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 780
 
Hi Svanessa.  Our children really did name our cat "Meow" but the rest was just to make the children laugh when they saw their cat here on the F4F Forum.

Meow is a "Rescue Cat."  We don't know where she came from or what happened to her, only that it wasn't good.  She was skin and bones and scarred to death when she arrived, but after several days of salmon and tuna, and recoving from a leg injury, she quickly become the happiest cat in the world.

We were having some rodent issues, but she fixed that right away.  She sleeps in the garage at night (for safety) but roams the garden and orchard all day chasing off any rodents and birds that get in the fruit trees.  She has been terrific.

She arrived in August, and when I covered the figs with straw for Winter, I was concerned about rodent damage, but there was absolutey none.  Meow spent all Winter patrolling the fig beds, and she continues her "Rat Patrol" every day.

Best wishes to all.

John


Subject: Rodents? Get a M.E.O.W.! Replies: 16
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 780
 
Recently, several F4F members have mentioned rodent troubles.  We had rodent troubles too, until we installed an advanced anti-rodent system, the:

Mouse
Elimination
Optimizing
Weaon

A.K.A., M.E.O.W.

We had rodents out the wazoo, and then we installed the M.E.O.W.  We haven't seen a rodent since (except the slower ones which she was crunching; not pretty, but better the M.E.O.W. eating the rodents than the rodents eating the figs and fig trees).

So get a M.E.O.W. anti-rodent system and say good-bye to annoying rodents!  ;-)

Attached Images
jpeg Meow_Halloween_2010.jpg (594.07 KB, 30 views)


Subject: Stink Bugs Replies: 19
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,208
 

P.S. Dominick.  The rooting in water thing is working great for us.  And the kids really enjoy being able to see what is happening with their fig cuttings.

Best wishes.

John

Subject: Stink Bugs Replies: 19
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,208
 
Hi Dominick.  Humans have been growing and enjoying figs for thousands of years.  The stinkiest Stink Bug in the world isn't going to change that.  Enjoy your figs my friend.

And Matt, the Red/Green Unknown cuttings rooted and leafed out nicely.  Thank you.  Hope you are well my friend.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Unknown Black fig from Southern France Replies: 12
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,864
 
Okay, stop it Dan, you're killing me!  That looks fantastic!  ;-)

Thanks for sharing.

Best wishes.

John

Subject: New member Replies: 19
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,108
 
Hi Pami.  Welcome, and I know that you will enjoy growing your fig and visiting with the people here.

Figs are a wonderful hobby, great fun, and super healthy for you and your family.  Also, there is nothing like the taste of your own home grown figs.  Store figs, even if you can find them, are expensive and inferior in quality.

Because fig varieties are cloned, you are growing a piece of history as well.

As I recall, the Hardy Chicago was originally found growing about 3,000 feet up Mt. Etna on the Island of Sicily, it was brought to Chicago, successfully grown there, and that is the origins of its name.

Whether it's the Mission Fig, the Hardy Chicago, etc., every fig has a history, and that is part of the fun.

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Concerns about new member Replies: 56
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 3,434
 
Didn't we all Gorgi.

Hair today, gone tommorow . . .

Subject: Concerns about new member Replies: 56
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 3,434
 
Aielee: السلام عليكم

Hope you will have the best fig garden in Nova Scotia.


Subject: FMV Transmission Replies: 20
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,658
 
Thank you Axier.  That was very, very helpful.

Despite two years of study (many years ago) my French is terrible, but I could read enough to get the main points.

And Noss:  I'll you know what this means:

"Laissez les bons temps rouler!"  ;-)

Subject: FMV Transmission Replies: 20
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,658
 
Hi Jon.  I have had FMV infected trees and uninfected trees within a few feet of each other for almost 10 years now.

Some varieties are clearly more vulnerable to FMV, showing symptoms in leaves and slower growth.

But do you thnk that all figs today have been exposed to FMV, but only some show symptoms?

Our LSU and White Hybrid, for example, have never shown any sign of FMV, and grow very fast, fruit very strong, even though there is a clearly infected tree right between them for almost a decade.

Best wishes.

John


Subject: Raspberry Latte Climate Replies: 41
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 3,980
 
Hi Geo.  It does look like a fantastic fig, but so far, I've just got about a three foot one year old tree.  No figs yet.

Jon can tell you though.  As I recall, he found it growing under a coffee tree there in Southern California.  And it must be good, or he would not have propogated it, as he has many to choose from so he can only choose the best for propogation.

So far, I am very happy to see that it is surviving and thriving here in Zone 7b, in ground.

Best wishes.

John


Subject: FMV Transmission Replies: 20
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,658
 
P.S. Very cool motor for what is no doubt a very cool boat.  Thanks for sharing.

Sounds like great fun, except honestly, snakes really creep me out.

So while gator boating in the swamp looks very cool, I think I'll stick to the mountain lakes and streams.  I'm sure there are some snakes there too, but fortunately, I almost never see them (which means less embarrassing running and screaming for me!).  ;-)

That looks like a great boat though Dan.  Hope you have a fantastic summer fishing in it.

Best wishes.

John

Subject: FMV Transmission Replies: 20
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,658
 
Hey Dan.  Fishing and figs.  It doesn't get much better than that.

I have a good friend up here in Gainesville who always says: "The farther we get away from the simple things than really matter in our lives, the less happy we will be."

There is great wisdom in that simple philosophy.

We had top kill on the newer figs, to the ground, but that is common, and I just checked and found new shoots budding out on all by one, which is the one that I was taking out anyway!

Good fishing friend, and hope you have the best fig season yet.

Best wishes to all.

John

Subject: FMV Transmission Replies: 20
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,658
 
Thanks Dan.  That is very helpful.

And I love the "Semper Fi-cus"!

I come from a family (Dad's side) where if you didn't have a Semper Fi tatoo, you felt absolutely out of place.

Hope your having a good Spring.

Best wishes.

John


Subject: FMV Transmission Replies: 20
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,658
 
Hi everyone.

I have a fig that has proven to be rather of a poor performer, but it is taking up prime real estate in the orchard.  It has a bad case of FMV, and I have too many good figs to allow it to just take up the best space.  So its next assignment will be roasting hot dogs and marshmallows at our next cook out.

Since it is sitting in one of the best fig growing spots in the orchard, I wanted to replace it with a strong variety with no FMV.

But could the new fig acquire FMV from the soil where the old fig was?

Thank you my friends.  I appreciate your insights on this.

Best wishes to all.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Raspberry Latte Climate Replies: 41
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 3,980
 
Hi Dominick.  The only cuttings that had any figlets in their first season that I recall late last summer was the Hardy Chicago.  But they came far too late and the plants were still too young to support fruit.

I will bet the new CHs and RLs will both have a few main crop figs this year though.

With some winter protection, the RL looks like it might do well many places.

Best wishes to all.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Raspberry Latte Climate Replies: 41
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 3,980
 
UPDATE: March 2011

The RL trees grew to nearly 3 feet last summer, even with taking off the tips to encourage side branching.

They also made it through what was a very cold and snowy winter by North Georgia Piedmont standards.  We got about a foot of snow in total, and temperatures were down in the teens often.  I covered all the new figs with a light layer of straw, but otherwise they were in ground with no other protection.  Nonetheless, I just uncovered the figs Sunday, and the RL is green on the wood except for the highest tips.  This seems to be good evidence that RL is hardy here in Zone 7b and has a good future.

p.s. I started this thread almost a year ago when I was very new to growing figs.

I have learned a lot since then (thanks to everyone here), but mostly what I have learned is that there is still a lot to learn!



Subject: Fig Hedge Replies: 54
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 5,500
 
Thanks Noss.  I will keep everyone posted on the progress, what works well, what didn't, and in this way by everyone sharing ideas and experiences, fig growing for everyone can be improved.

And hi JD.  Hope the fig hedge works well for you too.

I was pretty sure I had posted those pictures from last fall already, but since I didn't see them on this thread I posted them here.

I finished up the fig bed yesterday.  I will take a picture Sunday before I start planting, and post a photo of the bed, then a photo of it planted, and later this summer, the results of growth in year one.

It should work just fine though, because I have been growing blueberries and bush cherries like this for years successfully.  Using the hedge means less weeds (the hedge form shades out the weeds underneath pretty well). no mowing around each plant (just a straight shot mowing each side), easier and more efficient watering (just run a soaker hose down the length of the hedge), and easy picking just by walking down one side and up the other.

Best wishes to all.

John


Subject: Fig Hedge Replies: 54
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 5,500
 

I also added ground crab shells, ground shrimp shells, and lime to help balance the PH.


 

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