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Subject: Fig Hedge Replies: 54
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 5,500
 
I am very happy to share Jason, and even more happy that at least one person is interested!  ;-)

I do everything as naturally and organically as possible.  I'm not Amish, but grew up around the Amish.

I cleared most of the trees by hand, but have to confess that towards the end, a friend with a chain saw took pity on the old man with the hand saw and a row of trees!  ;-)

I did break down and get a rotatiller though.  I could dig with a shovel up by the Great Lakes (where we had many, many feet of top soil over peat moss), but this hard Georgia clay (and 20 years later) required a rotatiller.

I am amending the soil with lots of peat moss, some wood ash (from the cleared trees), ground alfalfa meal, kelp, and fish meal.  Then topping it with straw (to deter weeds), lots more peat moss, some top quality potting soil, and pine bark mini nuggets on top.

Then I will go down the row and plant, light figs on the North end, dark figs on the South end (because these will have to be netted together).  And run a soaker hose down the whole row.

Once this is done, it will be lots of figs, with not lots of work!

Best wishes.

John

Subject: Fig Hedge Replies: 54
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 5,500
 
Here are pictures of phase 1: Clearing the trees:


Attached Images
jpeg Fig_Hedge_2010_1.jpg (688.46 KB, 191 views)
jpeg Fig_Hedge_2010_2.jpg (949.63 KB, 215 views)
jpeg Fig_Hedge_2010_3.jpg (941.47 KB, 168 views)


Subject: Fig Hedge Replies: 54
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 5,500
 
Hi Jason.  I can do that.  I just wasn't sure anyone wanted to see the bare dirt, etc.  Even the planted twigs will be a little less than spectacular, to say the least, but maybe it would be nice to document the process.

Based on the progress from the test bed last summer though, by the end of the summer it should start looking pretty good.

Hope you are well my friend.

Best wishes.

John


Subject: Fig Hedge Replies: 54
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 5,500
 
The Fig Hedge Project is moving full speed ahead now.

The trees were cleared this winter (huge job), and now it's just 150 feet of rotatilled dirt, but as soon as I get the trees in I will post a picture.

Best wishes to all.

John

Subject: Another 5 Months Time Or So Replies: 4
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 604
 
Hi Martin.

I can confirm that Spring is definately on the way my friend!

I saw the first leaves and tiny, tiny brebas just a few days ago.

So summer will be there too before you know it.

Hope you are well my friend.

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Gino's Black Replies: 66
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 6,212
 
Now when you say "with some good reason" you have me curious Gorgi.

In Hebrew we use "Abba" as an informal word for father, like "Daddy" in English.

Maybe you have found the Daddy of All Figs my friend!  ;-)

The other Mt. Etna cultivars are outstanding in flavor.

Can't wait to hear more about this new fig.

Best wishes.

John

Subject: Gino's Black Replies: 66
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 6,212
 
Thank you Herman.  Good to know.  The better cold tolerance with the NJ Gino's would be helpful even here, as we sometimes have some real winter weather, including 12 inches of snow this winter and temperatures in the teens many nights.

Thank you for the great research you are doing on figs Herman.  You are helping thousands to grow figs better now, and in the future, helping millions in enjoying the very best tasting and nutritious figs.

And great thread Jason.  Thanks.

Best wishes to all.

John


Subject: Gino's Black Replies: 66
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 6,212
 
We got a "VDB" from Raintree Nursery last Spring.

It grew like a weed and fruited pretty well, just a few, but they were fantastic in flavor, almost "sparkling" in texture and taste.

Above Herman noted: "Your Violette de Bordeaux from Raintree,is Identical to Gino's fig,i have no doubt at all at this time" and ours may be also.  It did not split at all even after heavy rains, so it may be Gino's also.

Either way, it is an excellent fig, and should be even better as it matures.

Best wishes to all.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b


Subject: I'm quiting Replies: 46
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 2,363
 
Hi Gorgi.  There may have been a mouse in the pillow, but a RAT stole the bike!

We are very fortunate to live among neighbors who would bring your bike back to you if they found it, not steal it.  That is a shame.

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: I'm quiting Replies: 46
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 2,363
 
Hi Bass.  An understandable frustration.

I just want to say, to you, Jon, Herman (I should not have started with the names because I know I will leave too many out), so let me just say all of you who are leaders in growing figs, what you are doing is vitally important.

This is a fun hobby, but it's not just a hobby folks.  We are very likely in for some tough times for a long time, and figs are the perfect backyard fruit for every family.  They are very healthy also, and that source of nutrition is going to make a big difference for a lot of people in the future.

So even when it's difficult, please keep up the research, and please keep sharing the best cultivars with everyone.

And one more thing Bass.  I have gotten a lot of figs from you, and from many others here.  I am most grateful, but I want you to know that that is also an insurance policy for you.

Even if the @#*&ing mice eat every one of your figs, I have a cutting of that exact fig here my friend, and I will root it and send it to you (along with a box of mouse traps!).

Take care my friend.

John

Subject: Berry flavored figs Replies: 8
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,815
 
Hi MK and welcome to the Forum.  Some of our children are crazy about figs, some aren't.

But even our children that aren't crazy about figs love the Hardy Chicago.

Probably one of the better choices for an in-ground fig also.  I would definately plan on giving it some top-side winter protection in-ground in Zone 5b though.

A Hardy Chicago NEVER goes to waste around here.

Figs are super healthy, so I hope your children will enjoy them too.

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: LSU Purple Power! Replies: 54
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 5,836
 
Hi Noss and JCA.

I agree that the LSU is one tough fig.  We had nearly 10 years of drought here in North Georgia, and the LSU pulled through that just fine.  Once established, it stands up to the cold pretty well too, and is the first to leaf out in the Spring.  No FMV, no splitting from heavy rain, heavy production most of the summer and great tasting figs.  What's not to love?

It does take a few years to reach good flavor.  I almost dug mine up the first few years, but be patient.  After a few years the flavor will improve dramatically, as will productivity.

On the heat and humidity though JCA, you are definately in the right place.  I had a neighbor here in the North Georgia Piedmont who was telling me she loved North Georgia because it was cooler and less humid.  Coming from the Great Lakes, I thought she had lost her mind, as North Georgia summers to me are almost unbearable (but the rest of the year is great).  And then she told me she was from Baton Rouge.  I spent a year in Baton Rouge one week! (it seemed like a year).  Nice people, good food, etc., but it was like living under water in a swamp!  ;-)

So if you love heat and humidity my friend, South Lousiana is heaven!

Hope your LSU fig grows great for you, and I am sure it will.

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Variants Easy To Root Replies: 31
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 2,355
 
Hi Ed.  I had a total failure with the Aubique Petit.  Nearly all of them rotted, and the one that sprouted a few leaves quickly wilted and died.

I really don't think it was anything I did, but all the other cuttings are doing fine.

The cuttings that really amazed me though, were the Lindhurst Whites.  They all took off right away, 100% success, starting in just a few days.  And now I am having to prune back leaves on the largest one so it doesn't get too big before it can be safely set out.

The other cuttings are growing, but nothing like the Lindhurst White.  Hope it continues this vigor outside.  If so, it might even have a couple figs by fall.

Best wishes to all.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Just had a visit by the FBI Replies: 32
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 2,020
 
As long as the "red flag" for the government isn't our names, religions, ethnic backtgrounds, color, or race, I understand the need to follow up on potentially dangerous patterns of behavior and to assure that all is well.

There is a delicate balance between liberty and security, but if we don't have our liberty, soon we will no longer have any real security either.  Places without liberty end up fearing their own government more than anything else.

Most of the police I know, including FBI agents, are honest people trying to protect and serve.  But because they are honest, and believe in the Constitution and Liberty, they will also understand that we need to keep them honest by assuring that the laws are applied to everyone fairly and without any discrimination based on irrelevant factors.

That is the real America, and the reason so many of us came here: Liberty and Justice for all.  But we need to keep that a reality, and not just a line in the Pledge.

Peace be with you and your family Bass.

And best wishes to all.

John

Subject: Just had a visit by the FBI Replies: 32
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 2,020
 
Hi Paully.

My brother used to catch a lot of Salmon when he lived in Alaska, but Georgia isn't exactly Salmon country.  Some nice trout up in the north Georgia mountains though.

I have to buy dried fish fertilizer, but it is excellent.  I buy it is bulk every few years.  Not cheap, but well worth the money.



Subject: Just had a visit by the FBI Replies: 32
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 2,020
 
What bothers me Bass, is it sounds like you were unfairly profiled by some paranoid, prejudiced citizen.

Not to worry though.  You have a few Barney Fife's everywhere, but most FBI Agents are professionals.  They have to check leads out, they want to keep everyone safe, but they also know and respect the law, so when it's obvious it's a dead end/frivolous lead and nothing to be concerned about its over.

This is still America my friend.  You have no need to worry.

And if your Constitutional rights are not respected, I will send you my business card!

Grow your figs, relax, and enjoy life.

Best wishes.

John

Subject: Can Arsenic and Mercury get into figs? Replies: 11
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,266
 
You want to be very careful where you get your compost or anything else you add to your food garden soil, as the food chain is a soil to plant to human cycle.

You can have your soil tested for specific elements if you have specific concerns.

We did this before buying our property, and found our soil was pure except for a small trace of lead that appears anywhere there has been long-term gas powered farming or traffic, but at levels so low they are perfectly safe and unavoidable in the post-industrial world.

If it's too late, consider a new bed in a safer location.  There is also some research on plants that help to draw toxins out of the soil.

Subject: Any Reason Not to Go From Baggie To Ground? Replies: 11
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,040
 
I do all my rooting directly in ground (and this winter directly in potting soil).

Don't try it outside though until the soil thoroughly warms up.  And in pots, be careful to maintain proper moisture and avoid over-watering (which is probably the greater danger).

On the whole though, I have had reasonable good success (some cultivars root much easier than others) and it is a simple process.

It may or may not work well for others, but it works well for me.

It is easy, inexpensive, and simple.

And as the Quakers say: Tis a gift to be simple.

Subject: Just had a visit by the FBI Replies: 32
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 2,020
 
Go organic my friend: And then if they want to search through that "fertilizer" they are most welcomed to.

Subject: F4F - Terms of Service Replies: 11
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,509
 
Great Forum Jon.

I have learned a lot here and met many great people.

Thanks.

John


Subject: Fig tree Collections Replies: 36
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,869
 

Figs?  ;-)


Subject: LSU Purple Power! Replies: 54
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 5,836
 
It will take a few years to reach peak flavor, so you have to be patient, but this will be a great fig for you: Great flavor and high productivity over an extended season.

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Fig tree Collections Replies: 36
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,869
 
I have about an acre for plants, but some of it's garden and a lot of it is apples, pears, pecans, cherries, berries, etc.

So I am putting in fig hedges around the orchard to efficiently use space (see my prior thread on this topic).

And I'm also being "Johnny FigTree" getting family, friends, neighbors, and total strangers started growing these fantasticly healthy and delicious fruits. 

The World will be a better place for us all when everyone has a fig tree!  ;-)

And as far as cars, I'm driving a 98 Honda Civic.  Now THAT'S one sweet ride guys (if all you care about is gas milleage and reliability that is; not great for picking up the chicks; but since I've been married for 25 years that's yet another plus). . .  ;-)

Best wishes to all

John

Subject: Celeste disappointing? Replies: 19
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,332
 
Hi Jason.  Very true my friend.

If we all did nothing till circumstances were ideal, we would all do nothing!

Gardening (and life) is about doing the best you can with what you have.

Best wishes to all.

John


Subject: Celeste disappointing? Replies: 19
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,332
 
I am eating some fantastic preserves made from Celeste figs right now.  There seem to be many varients among the Celestes, some good, some not as good.

The Celeste I picked these from belongs to a good friend.  Her father planted it about 30 years ago, and now it is huge, and produces huge crops, which thankfully she shares with me.  She supplies the figs; I make the preserves; and both of us are happy.  It makes the best preserves ever.

I have a Celeste though, that is on its last year if it doesn't change its ways, and I am not optimistic.  It drops fruit and what it produces isn't that great.  I'm giving it one more year.

But I already have some better replacements.  Herman's nursery offers some great strains of Celeste, so I am growing his "No Drop" Celeste (which drops much less) and his "Blue Celeste" which I think came from Jon's Nursery originally.  Both should be great.

But to answer your question, one of the most fun things to do as a gardener is to succeed greatly at things people told you you can't do.  Our AG agent said there were only three types of figs that would grow successfully here: Celeste; Brown Turkey; and Hardy Chicago.  I am now growing over 50 different types.  He looked in a book for that wisdom; I planted things in the ground.  Turns out you can do lots of things the "experts" say you can't do.

The people here at the F4F Forum actually grow figs, they don't just read books about them, so I'm sure you will get some good advice Ken, and then plant a Celeste!

Best wishes to all.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b 

Subject: What is the difference- Rooting in water or in frequently watered Perlite ? Replies: 5
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 982
 

Hi Dominick.  I have some extra cuttings so I am going to try a few in water also for fun, and maybe I will get lucky too.

I have been rooting all my cuttings just by putting them in good quality light potting soil in ground last Spring and Summer, and in pots indoors this Winter. 

In the pots this Winter, the Lindhurst Whites took off right away (it was pretty amazing), and are growing like weeds.  The Paradiso Whites are doing well, so are the Blue Celestes, and several unknowns, but I only had one Aubique Petite sprout leaves, but then it died unfortunately (but after an appropriate period of mourning I just planted another).  Can't win everytime I guess.

What drives me crazy about sprouting them in ground/pots though is that if they don't take off right away (some do; but most don't and take many weeks before you see any leaves or signs of life, other than some greening on the cuttings bark sometimes which is a good sign; but some show no greening and send up leaves from lower down later), you just have no idea what is happening under the surface of the soil, and that drives me crazy wondering whether they are sprouting roots or not.

With the water method, you could see, so this will be fun.  We home school our children, so you just gave us a great science project Dominick.  Thanks.

Best wishes to all.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b


Subject: mass propagation Replies: 11
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,113
 
I grew all of my fig cuttings directly in-ground last year with good success, and spaced pretty close.  You do have to be careful in separating them out, but you need to be careful anyway if you don't want to damage new roots and leaves.

Here in Georgia though: 1) You are going to need to amend the soil; rock hard red clay won't do; dig up a good sunny area small bed and top it with several inches of good potting soil; and 2) You won't be able to do this until around the first of April here in North Georgia, a little sooner further south, but they won't root in cold soil.

Great idea though.  I'm going to grow a lot of new fig trees also to give to children and families all around the area, so they will always have some good healthy fruit to eat. 

Best wishes to all.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Bteghrine Lebanon Web Site Replies: 4
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 842
 
Thank you Bill.  I greatly enjoyed these as well.

I have many good friends from Lebanon, so I will share these with them as well.

Greatly appreciated my friend.

John

Subject: LSU Purple Power! Replies: 54
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 5,836
 
Hi Noss and JCA.

Noss knows the climate there in Louisiana, and it's different than here in the North Georgia Piedmont.  BTs do fine here, but the humidity and heat there in LA are way beyond what we get here.

I have never seen one of our LSU Purples split though, even after a massive rain which we often get here in the summer.

We got our first VDB fruit this summer and it was definately a winner too.

And figs don't take up much space JCA is they are kept pruned properly.  I see people that just let them go and they can sprawl to 20+ feet.  It's more convenient for the birds to pick, but otherwise, keeping the figs pruned down to no more than 6 or 7 feet tall is best.  Easier to pick, easier to net if needed (and it is with the LSU Purple; the birds love them), and you can fit several varieties in the space one overgrown tree would fit.

Subject: LSU Purple Power! Replies: 54
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 5,836
 
Hi JCA.

The LSU Purple would do great in your climate, and it is very healthy, loving the heat and humidity.

As far as what to do with the figs, consider making some fig preserves.

I just put the figs in the food processor, then add lemon and sugat to taste while still cool, and then cook till it starts to thicken.  No pectin needed.

Also consider drying figs.  We have been eating fig preserves (the best preserves ever) and dried figs all winter.



Subject: Unknown cuttings trade ? Replies: 11
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,383
 
Looks like it could be a match Bass.  Either way, both are great looking figs. 

We don't seem to have any trouble with the birds bothering the green figs, so there is no need to net them, which is another big plus for this fig.

Mike's wife personally delivered the best looking cuttings I have ever seen.  We live about 25 miles apart, so she brought them to my office.  That was exceptionally nice of her, and greatly appreciated.  They sent enough cuttings for many families, so I have been sharing them with other gardeners also well.  We never let anything go to waste, especially such a nice looking fig.

Thanks again Mike.  We truly appreciate your sharing this unique fig, and hope the ones we sent will grow well for you too.

Very best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Are you hungry for a fresh figs? Replies: 29
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 2,478
 
Thank you Bass.  Just looking at these pictures was like a little taste of summer.

Peace be with you my friend.

John


Subject: On a mission for the best Mission Replies: 33
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,675
 
Hi Ottowan.  Hope you are doing all right with all that snow coming in the Great Lakes area.

You too Martin.

We talked with family still up there today and they are getting out the generators and preparing for no power and the possibility of several feet of drifting snow.

I greatly appreciate everyone's thoughts on Mission Figs, etc.  I learned a lot as usual.

Jon, you should change the name here to: Fig University!

Talking about these makes it seem like summer is just around the corner.

(I know it isn't; but it's nice to dream for a while).

Best wishes to all.

John

Subject: On a mission for the best Mission Replies: 33
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,675
 
Thanks Jon.  Getting an NL Mission Fig is now at the top of my wish list for this year.

Also, on the "Size shouldn't be a big issue" thing, that's a topic for a whole different thread . . .

(I love this Forum!)  ;-)

Subject: On a mission for the best Mission Replies: 33
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,675
 
Hi Bass.  Great question.  I will defer others with more expertise on figs for a specific answer, but here is a general answer: Genes are constantly in flux.  Even a cloned plant might experience a genetic mutation over time caused by a virus, etc., so that even with asexual reproduction there will be small genetic shifts over time.

Further, as Jon has said, figs are very sensitive to their environment, so even if you had two figs that were genetically identical (at the time), they might appear somewhat different due to variations in local environmental factors, and the fruit might be dramatically different.

It is good to have names, so we have some reasonable agreement about what it is we are talking about, and people know what they are getting and what they are growing.

But while the abstraction of perfect categories is appealling, it is likely the the reality is far too complex to fit into neat and separate categories on every plant in perpetuity.  There may have been, for example, an original Mission Fig, but now there are many, including some that were mislabled and are not related to the original.  But they are all Mission Fig-ish.

And Jason, we have that same pattern with all of our inground trees: Freeze back and regrowth from the roots every year.  But after a few years, they toughen up and form a solid hard wood base that take the freezing winters.

Best wishes to all.

John

Subject: On a mission for the best Mission Replies: 33
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,675
 
Thanks Bass!  Now THAT is an interesting history!

Best wishes.

John

Subject: On a mission for the best Mission Replies: 33
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,675
 
Hi Jon.  And thanks.

Do you know of a good source for the NL variant of the Mission Fig?

And if the Vista is a larger variant of the VDB that would be great, as the VDB is outstanding but rather small.

My great thanks to everyone for the most helpful information.

And Italiangirl, I was wondering the exact same thing!

Figs are fun to grow, great to eat, very healthy, etc., but one of the reasons I love figs is that as clones you can have an exact replica of an historical plant, so the history of the variety interests me as well.

Best wishes to all.

John

Subject: On a mission for the best Mission Replies: 33
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,675
 
Thanks Peg.  I have heard that the fresh Missions are delicious.

So far we only have dried Missions (we ordered a case of organic dried Mission Figs).  Those were delicious too.  Best dried figs ever.

And the dark color likely means that the Mission Figs are loaded with healthy anti-oxidants.

Hope you make it through the snow fine and that Spring comes early for you Peg.

Best wishes.

John


Subject: On a mission for the best Mission Replies: 33
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,675
 
Hi Herman.  Hope you are well my friend.

This is very interesting (that Vista is a variety of VDB).  To me at least, VDB is an outstanding fig, so this is a plus.  And Vista is relatively cold hardy also.  Another plus.  I also read on another thread that Vista is reported to be less prone to splitting from heavy rain (thanks for the heads up on this concern Jason).

Given all of this, Vista would probably be a real winner here I would think. 

But I am also increasingly thinking that we should try several varieties of Mission, as here in Zone 7b we should have the longer, hotter season needed.

The more I have read about the Missions though, the more interested I am in these.

I think maybe I will have to get more land!  ;-)

Thanks to everyone.  I greatly appreciate your input and I am learning a lot. 

Hope some of this is helpful to others learning as well.

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont 

Subject: On a mission for the best Mission Replies: 33
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,675
 
Thank for sharing this Martin.  I enjoyed reading through the whole thread.

Ed said he had 4 different strains of Mission.  Looks like there are quite a few out there.

Maybe we need not just one Mission, but a collection of Missions?  ;-)

The mission to find the perfect Mission continues! . . . .

Subject: On a mission for the best Mission Replies: 33
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,675
 
Thanks Ottawan.  That does sound like a winner.

Our local nursery had a nice sized good looking fig tree labeled only as "Mission Fig" and I passed: 1) Because there appears to be many strains; and 2) Honestly, anytime you buy from them it turns out to be a "mystery fig" anyway (sometimes good; sometimes not).

So if I was going to grow from cuttings, I wanted to start with the best strain, and greatly appreciate everyone's thoughts, which I hope will be helpful to many as this is a very common fig, and a very good one, and propogating only the best cultivars is in everyone's best interests.

Thanks.  Ottawan.  Despite the recent weather, hope you have an early Spring.

John

Subject: On a mission for the best Mission Replies: 33
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,675
 
My fig addiction is now beyond cure I am certain, having acquired nearly 50 different varieties in less than a year.

So given that, there is only one way to go: Forward, with more figs.

But as I increasingly run out of space, I have to be far more particular about planting only the best cultivars.

And with all the figs, we still don't have a Mission Fig.

The Mission is a very common and outstanding fig, but there are many strains.

What does everyone think is the best strain of Mission?

Thank you friends, and hope you are all well, and that your figs are making it through the winter well too.  It's been a tough one so far.

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Today ,I checked my protected trees,for life! Replies: 20
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,542
 
Okay, I wasn't going to go there, but since we are talking about geo-thermal, some high nitrogen organic matter (i.e., manure) buried under a cold-frame will also produce heat.

Personally, I'm not that desperate for heat!  ;-)

Best wishes to all.

John

Subject: Today ,I checked my protected trees,for life! Replies: 20
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,542
 
Hi Ed.  Hope you are well my friend.

I'm no expert, but my understanding is that it works like insulation: The box traps air (not perfectly but far more than an open space) and the trapped layer of air helps to insulate the plant from temperature extremes occuring outside the box in the day/night cycle.

For example, it may get up to 30 during the day and down to 5 at the coldest part of the night, but the temperature inside the box drops slower, meaning that the figs inside are exposed to both lesser extremes in temperatures and lesser periods of time at the lowest temperatures.

It's not going to make a dramatic difference, but there is a difference in plant stress between 5 degrees for 12 hours and 15 degrees for 6 hours.

But if it stayed 5 degrees steady with no warm up in the day at all for an extended time period, it would get down to 5 degrees in the box too in time.

This sort of insulation box helps to moderate the extremes, but only slows down the cooling (or heating).  That's how mulch works too.

Our figs are mulched at the base, but no other protection.  Hope your figs are fine, and those Latturalas are really tough!  The one you sent us grew like a weed this summer and still looks pretty much untouched by the cold here.  Our Texas Blue got toasted pretty quick, but the more cold hardy varieties seem fine so far.

Very best wishes.

John

Subject: Today ,I checked my protected trees,for life! Replies: 20
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,542
 
Hi Herman.  That is great news.  Thanks for sharing.

It is amazing what can be achieved with some creative planning.

We have had a tough winter here so far too, with lows in the lower 20s regularly and even down to the lower teens some nights.  That is unusually cold for North Georgia Zone 7b.

All of our trees are in-ground but heavily mulched, and even if they get cut back to the ground by the cold (which the new ones almost always do), they always come back from the roots, until they get big enough to over-winter better.

The older well-established trees still look great.  I checked them today.  The Georgia Yellow Unknown Hybrid; the LSU Purple; and the Hardy Chicago have not been damaged at all.

Given your tougher climate though Herman, the boxes for protection are a great idea and now sound like a proven winner, protecting down to near zero.

I will be pruning tomorrow, because Spring will be here before you know it.

It got up to about 60 today I think.

Best wishes to all.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Tashkent Fig Replies: 43
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 4,305
 
Hi Jason and everyone.

I got one of these last fall and it's in ground now.

Doesn't sound promising though, based on multiple reports.

If just a few people had this problem I wouldn't be concerned, but looks like some people who really know their figs are having trouble with this one.

Oh well, you win some lose some.

Gives me an excuse to buy another fig!  ;-)

Subject: What figs don't do well in the South and why Replies: 16
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,363
 
Hi Noss.  The LSU Purple is one tough fig, loving the heat and humidity of the South: The hotter it is, the better they taste.

I would definately recommend the LSU Purple for the South, but no fig is perfect, it's always trading this for that.  The LSU Purple is one of the best, but it takes several years from a cutting to the development of a tree that will produce really great tasting figs.  The first few years, I even thought about taking out the LSU Purple, as the figs didn't taste that good.  Everyone be patient though: The flavor improves DRAMATICALLY with age.

I'm also trying a Texas Blue Giant which may be a good fig for the South.  Despite showing signs of FMV, it was a strong grower and produced a good crop of figs the first year here (I bought it though; at least two years old from the cutting).  My concern about the TBG is whether it will take the cold here in the North Georgia Piedmont.  It was 14 degrees this morning, and we have had snow on the ground for most of the week, so we will see.  If the TBG takes that cold, as cold as it gets here, it is a winner for Zone 7 southward.

Best wishes to all.

John

Subject: What figs don't do well in the South and why Replies: 16
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,363
 
Here in the North Georgia Piedmont (zone 7b) one of the biggest problems we have is unstable temperatures in the Spring.

It will warm up too much, too early, the figs leaf out, and BOOM, they get hit by a late hard freeze.

Overall though, figs seem to love the sun and heat in the South.  They get cut back by late hard freezes some years, but usually bounce back fine for the main crop.

Best wishes to all.

John

Subject: Happy New Year Replies: 19
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,126
 
Happy New Year to you Martin, and to all, and very best wishes for a happy and healthy new year.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b


Subject: Having Some Fun Replies: 38
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 2,162
 
Thank you Jason, Martin, Ottawan, Rafed, and all for this terrific advice.

The first thing I tried (today) was bagging the plants so no gnats could escape, and them I took them outside and chased away as many gnats as I could see, then put about an inch of Perlite on top to make it harder for the gnats to get to the dirt if they returned.  There was an immediate improvement, no gnats right now, but they may be back.

If so, I will try the above rememdies, starting with those that are least toxic.

I am finding that the budding fig cuttings are helping me deal with the garden withdrawels I usually have in the winter.  It is great fun to look at them every day, see what growth is new, and dream about planting them in the Spring and then harvesting some great figs in a few years.

Happy holidays to all.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

 

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