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Subject: What else do you grow? Replies: 106
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 9,150
 
Hi Ox.  Hope you have many, many more good healthy years, but the Goumi fruits quickly.  If you are starting with a decent sized plant (we got ours from Raintree Nursury and One Green World Nursery) you might get a little fruit to taste even the first year, but the second year for sure, and then you will start getting some nice crops after that.

Very best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Having Some Fun Replies: 38
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 2,162
 
Thanks Jason.  How big did they get on average before it was warm enough for you to set them out?

Hope all is well with you my friend.

Best wishes.

John

Subject: rooting large cuttings Replies: 25
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 2,864
 
Early this Spring when I was getting my outside rooting bed ready, I pruned some one inch plus diameter branches from the Yellow Unknown fig tree growing nearby.  I quickly cut them to about two foot long lengths and buried them in the compost pile just to see what would happen.

With no care at all they rooted and grew very strong all summer.

I'm relatively new at this, but based on what I have seen so far, I would generally prefer a cutting that was a little large over a cutting that was a little small.

I have, however, had very good luck rooting the terminal ends of branches too, especially if they are pencil size or larger.

In generally, figs seem pretty easy to root.

Happy holidays to all.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Having Some Fun Replies: 38
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 2,162
 

p.s.  The figs are already leafing out and other than the gnats everything is going great.


Subject: Having Some Fun Replies: 38
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 2,162
 
Hi Martin.  Could I please ask two quick questions:

1) Is it too early to start rooting figs indoors?; and

2) I already started a few dozen (about a month ago) and I noticed gnats this morning.  Do the gnats harm the figs, and how can you get rid of them?

Thank you my friend.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: What else do you grow? Replies: 106
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 9,150
 
Thanks Scott.  I tried a North Star almost 10 years ago.  It did better than the other varieties and fruited for a year or tow, but the extreme drought we had at the time probably killed it.  So I will try a North Star again.  I truly appreciate the suggestion as cherries are one of our favorites and it's definately worth another try.

Happy holidays.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Atreano Taste!,Vivian Question. Replies: 17
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,515
 
Hi Herman.  I would add that the Lindhurst seems VERY easy to root.

Individual's success rate will vary of course, but I had 100% success in rooting the Lindhurst White, and we can't wait to try the fruit.

Happy holidays my friend.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: What else do you grow? Replies: 106
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 9,150
 
Hi Bill.  My job can sometimes be very stressful, and my fig trees, orchard, and garden are the perfect remedy.  I always feel a great sense of peace and happiness, even after a very tough day, when I walk through the garden to see what is happening today and dream about what it will be like in the future.

So what I am saying, is that this hobby has also saved me a LOT of money I would have had to pay for a Counselor!  ;-)

It's also fun to be able to talk with others here about their gardens and projects.  Most of my neighbors couldn't care less.  They are nice people of course, but when I take them vegetables, I'm pretty sure they don't have any idea what to even do with them.

So it's great to know that there are still lots of people out there who care about gardening, good health for their families, etc.

And one final thought: Most of our neighbors don't know it yet, but soon, they will need a garden too.  Think about it.  Throughout human history, except for the last few decades, everyone had a garden.  And when they need to learn, we will be there my friend, ready to help.

And Spring will be here before you know it.

Best wishes.

John

Subject: What else do you grow? Replies: 106
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 9,150
 
Hi Bill and Goldie.

On funding your hobby, some people make some money selling plants, etc., but for most of us this hobby funds itself in a different way:

1) You really can save a lot of money growing your own produce (which means not having to buy as much at the store);

2) The health benefits of home-grown organic produce are enormous, and you could save thousands, and even hundreds of thousands on medical bills over a lifetime by eating more home-grown organic produce (with all the anti-oxidants, vitamins, minerals, soluable fiber, etc., and none of the pesticides, e-coli, heavy metals, etc.);

3) You get great exercise gardening, further contributing to your health; and

4) You can't buy the joy of seeing your own figs, etc., grow and fruit, a peace and happiness that further contributes to your health and quality of life.

So even if you never make a penny in cash, you are saving big bucks over the years.

And if your spouse doesn't buy any of that (all of which I sincerely believe is absolutely true), ask them to think of all that things you might be getting in trouble with if you weren't busy out in the garden!  ;-)

John

Subject: What else do you grow? Replies: 106
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 9,150
 
Hi Bill.  The Goumi is very cold hardy, coming from the Russian East.

We are growing it here in Zone 7b so it takes heat well too, but the catalog description says it will survive negative 25 degrees F.

Kentucky Zone 6 never gets that cold, and it should be safe up through northern zone 5 (southern Michigan).

You can grow from seed.  I have never tried, but it is said to be a slow hit and miss process.  For under $20 at either Raintree or One Green World I would just buy one and you will have fruit much sooner, possibly even a few to taste the first year, the second  year for sure, and in 3 to 4 years you will be getting some respectable crops.  Also, while you may get a good seedling, you may not.  I like the Red Gem because of it's size and mild flavor.  The seedling we have is good too but slightly more astrigent until dead ripe.  The Red Gem is sweeter, bigger, juicier, and milder.  There are now some other named varieties I haved tried, but they look good also.

Best wishes.

John


Subject: What else do you grow? Replies: 106
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 9,150
 
Hi Goldie.  I must confess that I have wasted a lot of money trying unusual edibles.  The "Sea Berry" project went on for years and wasted hundreds of dollars, and in the end they all died without producing one berry.

Goumi has been a winner though.  Just so everyone knows, they are not true cherries, and while they taste cherry like, and we think quite good, these aren't traditional cherries.

We love that they are so early fruiting and abundant though.  The children eat lots of them fresh right off the bush (so do we) and I pick them with a hand held rake (I said cranberry earlier; but maybe a lingonberry rake?) and then wash them (no need to seed or stem), cook them, and strain out the seeds and stems in one of those cullender things, and you have lots of cherry sauce to use and can.  We pour the sauce over angel food cake (terrific!), make preserves, and I make "cherry" pies that taste like a cherry pie but have the texture of a lemon pie because the "cherries" have been strained.  Excellent though.

You can grow from seed or air layer, but they sell for less than $20 at Raintree Nursury or One Green World.  They are partially self-fertile but you get more fruit with two varieties (you get a lot with one though).  Full sun.  Our first was a seedling from Raintree (the childrens favorite) but my favorite is the Red Gem from One Green World.  Here's the Raintree link:

http://www.raintreenursery.com/catalog/producttype.cfm?producttype=Goumi

Goumis are extremely cold hardy, but will grow very well here in Georgia too.

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: What else do you grow? Replies: 106
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 9,150
 
Hi Jason.  I have never done airlayering with the Goumi, but it is possible.  Not difficult but a little slow I think.  I may try it though just to see.

They really aren't hard to grow though,  I can tell you that, pretty much grow like weeds.  They are nitrogen fixers so you don't need to fertilize them, but you do need to prune them back good every year to keep them at a good picking height.

Overall it's a nice edible/unusual for the orchard, and said to have many health benefits too.

One other plus: It's the first fruit to ripen.  I can't remember when exactly but VERY early, well before anything else in the Spring.

I would give the Goumis a thumbs up.

Downsides: Some thorns (depending on variety); small fruits (but tons of them; I use a hand held cranberry rake to pick and have many gallons of fruit); need to prune every year after the plants reach about 5 to 6 feet or they will quickly be 10 feet and hard to pick.

Subject: Atreano Taste!,Vivian Question. Replies: 17
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,515
 
Hi Herman.  The Atreano we got from you made good progress and solid growth this year, and hopefully it will fruit next summer.  We can't wait!  ;-)

Hope you are well my friend.

Best wishes and happy holidays to all.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: What else do you grow? Replies: 106
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 9,150
 
Looking at everyone's lists, I notice that I forget to list a lot of the things we are growing.  I guess we are always trying something new.

I really envy those of you who can grow bananas.

My family used to own a banana plantation, and we love bananas, but only the ornamental kind can be grown here outside unprotected, and they get cut to the ground every year.

My wife has been very successful with beautiful ornamental pomegranates, so I am field testing some cold hardy fruiting types.  So far the plants are doing well, but we will see if they have time to ripen when they fruit next year.  My guess is it's going to be a pretty close call, but fun either way, and beautiful flowers either way.

It actually gets pretty cold here in the North Georgia Piedmont sometimes, down to the mid-teens the last few nights and we have had a little snow.

Nonetheless, our long, hot summers produced some outstanding figs last year.

Some of my favorite things to grow are cabbage during the winter and potatoes in the Spring.  I have about 50 heads of cabbage in the field right now.  My family is from Eastern Europe, so we couldn't live without the cabbage and potatoes, and the figs of course.

Best wishes to all.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: What else do you grow? Replies: 106
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 9,150
 
Hi Jason.  We tried Autumn Olive but didn't like it, and a Forestry neighbor also said it was an invasive species, so we took it out.

The Goumis have done very well though.  I have two varieties.  The first I just can't remember the variety and I don't have any records unfortunately, but the second is definately a Red Gem

http://www.onegreenworld.com/index.php?cPath=1_28

I like the Red Gem but the kids like the other one.  The Red Gem is larger, and to me better flavored but both are good.

We get our mushroom plugs from Fungi Perfecti

http://www.fungi.com (I think)

Growing in a stump is really easy.

Hope you are well my friend, and happy holidays.

John


Subject: What else do you grow? Replies: 106
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 9,150
 
Hi Jason.  I several different varieties of cherry trees and had no luck with any of them.  They didn't produce but a few and died in a few years.

I keep our Nankings trimmed to 5-6 feet and they produce pretty well most every year.  I do have a larger variety Goumi, but I will have to check the tag to tell you the variety (sorry), but I will check and get back to you.

Great thread Saxonfig.  And yes you are right.  Probably nearly all of us a Garden nuts, not just fig nuts, but I do like figs pretty well I must admit.

Also, we grow mushrooms.

Subject: What else do you grow? Replies: 106
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 9,150
 
p.s. Just to be clear, Nanking Cherries (a bush cherry) do VERY WELL here, it's just the standard tree varieties we have had trouble growing.

Subject: What else do you grow? Replies: 106
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 9,150
 
Like Jason we are growing the Nanking Cherries.  Cherries have not done well here (Zone 7b), so I'm interested in how well your Stella Cherry is doing Jason.

I would also recommend trying Goumi.  It is a cherry like fruit.  We have two different varieties now, but our first was self-fertile for many years.  I think they are very cold hardy (check the catalog description first though).  Our children like these very much fresh, and I make some really good sauces and desserts with these.

Here's what we grow though:

Blueberries (lots!)
Figs
Apples
Pears
Goumi
Nanking Cherry
Grapes
Elderberry
Pecans
Persimmons
Paw Paws
JuJube
Raspberries
Plums
Apricots
And lots of garden vegetables year-round with winter hoop tunnels.

Best wishes and happy holidays to all.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Black Genoa Replies: 24
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 3,781
 
A very interesting looking fig, but I'm with Herman: With that open eye it would never stand up to our 50 inches of rain and high humidity.  A friend here brought a fig from Lebanon.  It grew well, and it was an interesting fig, until I saw that when they started to ripen, about half of the figs were fuzy looking (fungus) and even the ones that weren't fuzy, many were soured.  I tightly closed eye is important in our climate.

Hope everyone is well.

Happy holidays.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Happy thanksgiving Replies: 10
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 955
 
And a very happy Thanksgiving to you and your family Bass.

John


Subject: Black Bethlehem Replies: 26
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 7,178
 
Hi Bass.  Our Bethlehem Black made good progress this summer, and we should have some fruit next summer.  For many figs it takes some time for the flavor to develop.  This fig looks wonderful though, and I am certain it will be worth the wait.  This is a great find Bass.  Thanks.

Best wishes.

John

Subject: Confirming ID for Yellow Unknown Replies: 19
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,900
 
It's November 18th and I just picked a ripe fig from the Georgia Yellow Unknown.

It has a light breba crop in the Spring.  The brebas are very large, and good tasting, but there aren't very many brebas.  Most of them drop before ripening.

The main crop is very heavy, and mostly ripens over just a few weeks from mid-July to early August (these have excellent fresh eating quality, but having large amounts all at once is ideal for making fig preserves and drying).

But it set a very small number of late figs as well.  I really thought they would do anything,  but much to my surprise, we just picked a ripe one.  It was smaller, more tart, and redder on the inside than the main crop, and not near the excellent quality of the main crop, but hey, not bad for later November.

Best wishes to all.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Request for Cuttings for Non-Profit Replies: 6
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 732
 
Hi Matt.  That is a fantastic project.

I am very happy to send some cuttings of an excellent tasting, early, and very productive modern hybrid that will be great for food production purposes.

Send me a private message with your address.

Keep up the great work my friend.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: DEER WARS Replies: 18
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,266
 
Holy crap!  O.K., Gene, no more complaining from me as long as they stay OUTSIDE!

I really would be in favor of bringing back wolves, which were a natural check and balance on the deer.

And as far as I know, wolves won't eat your figs, just the critters who eat  your figs.

Hope all is well there in the Bayou and that you are enjoying this great Fall weather.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: DEER WARS Replies: 18
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,266
 
Best figs to you too my friend.

Figs are loaded with healthy vitamins, minerals, and quick energy healthy fruit sugars.

So if I can convince Coach Richt that figs would help him win more games for the Bulldogs, Coach Richt will be planting those fig hedges personally!  ;-)

John

Subject: DEER WARS Replies: 18
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,266
 
Hi Strudeldog.  We are over here by Athens, so that's quite a drive from Canton, and since there's no shortage of deer between here and there probably not worth the drive.

Also, my neighbors on it.  And, while I want the deer gone, there can't be any evidence I'm involved in the hit (the kids still think these giant rats are cute).

Hope your son has success though.  I'm joking a lot about the deer, but really, the deer are a serious safety problem.  It's not their fault, they are just trying to live, but with their natural predators gone and so much area opened up for housing the deer population is out of control.

Best wishes.

John


Subject: DEER WARS Replies: 18
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,266
 
Hi Strudeldog.  Actually, that makes sense, and explains why we only see this type of damage this type of year.  They aren't eating it, but just attacking an "antler like" object or rubbing the felt off their new antlers (or some other crazy thing deer do)!

If they don't like the latex/sap, the latex is still there, so they probably aren't eating it.  And all the pieces were on the ground, not eaten.

The deer are just giant rats as far as we are concerned, and I hoping wolves make a come back.

Subject: Does anybody use a hoop house? Replies: 33
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 3,525
 
Hi Dennis.  I am VERY impressed!  That is a beautiful set up.  I love it!

What a great place to be on a cold winter day, it is both useful and beautiful!

Thank you for sharing these wonderful pictures.

Enjoy my friend!

John



Subject: Winter Garden Replies: 20
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,351
 
Hi Valerie.  I'm not at home right now, but I will get you a link as soon as I can.  I think it was in GRIT but I will let you know for sure.

In the meantime, here is a useful link from Eliot Coleman on greenhouses:

http://www.fourseasonfarm.com/resources/index.html#greenhouses

Best wishes.

John

Subject: Does anybody use a hoop house? Replies: 33
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 3,525
 
Hi Dennis.  That greenhouse looks great.

See my recent thread "Winter Garden" and there is a picture of the wire mini-hoops I use with removable plastice covering.  Here in Zone 7b it creates a freeze-free environment when covered, and is very, very low cost, easy to make, and easy to use.

I have been using these low cost mini-hoop tunnels to economically grow cool season vegetables for years, but this year I am trial testing fig cuttings also to see if I can root them for transplant out in the Spring.  I will let you know how it goes.

Eliot Coleman uses larger (but still moveable) greenhouse like the one in the picture, with mini-hoop tunnels inside them for a double layer of protection and is growing year round unheated in coastal Maine, Zone 5.  Here's his website: http://www.fourseasonfarm.com/

My brother back in Maine is going to try this too.  He's in Bangor, so it's a little colder but still zone 5.

Let us know how it works for you Dennis.

Take care good friend.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Wrapping the fig tree for winter Replies: 2
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 963
 
That is a VERY helpful guide Bass.  Especially the tip on the new figs, as we have lots of those.  Greatly appreciated.

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: DEER WARS Replies: 18
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,266
 
The deer are totally out of control here in North Georgia, so hunters are most welcomed.  The deer are actually quite dangerous on the roads.

And they will eat almost anything, especially during drought conditions when foraging is tough.  And yet they don't eat our figs, except the bark on the young bare trees in the fall and winter.

My guess is that the deer don't like the smell of the leaves.  I also thought it might be the latex sap, but that would still be there even when the leaves drop I would think.

Anyway, we are blessed that they don't attack the figs in the summer, and so are they, because if they attacked our figs and ate the fruit, it really would be WAR!  ;-)

Subject: Georgia fig hunt Replies: 5
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 2,380
 
When we were riding our bikes, we saw a turkey here in Georgia, but that's not nearly as exciting as this story my friend!  ;-)

These look amazing Bass.

Special thanks to you, Alstair, and everyone who helps make these unique figs available to growers in the U.S.

Very best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Winter Garden Replies: 20
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,351
 

I just read an article about a woman in Minnesota who built a passive solar greenhouse for winter food production.  It uses a buried bed of stone and gravel with vent pipes running through it.  Warm air from daytime heating of the greenhouse is pumped down through the stone during the day (a solar powered fan) and then the stone bed radiates heat through the night.  She has a back-up propane heater if temperatures drop below 40 inside the greenhouse overnight, but she said she is heating for less that $50 a year (so very little extra heat is used; even in Minnesota), and harvesting all year from the greenhouse.


Subject: Which cuttings are easy to start and hard to start Replies: 7
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,183
 
Hi Jon.  The cuttings we got from you were outstanding, with a very high success rate, often 100%, so they definately were of very high quality.

As I mentioned the Raspberry Latte was 100% in rooting, and a very strong grower, up to 4 feet and lightly branched in just this summer.  I don't know how it will respond to our climate in the winter, but hopefully we can overwinter it successfully, and it should fruit next year if it can take our climate (still unknown; but worth a try).

Excellent cuttings Jon.  All did well, thank you very much.  We look forward to seeing what you will have this season.

Best wishes to all.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: DEER WARS Replies: 18
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,266
 
Please gentlemen, help yourselves.  There's plenty for everyone.

And trust me, given what they have been eating, they should be delicious!  ;-)

Subject: propagate sukers. Replies: 25
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,679
 
That is VERY helpful Eve.  Thank you so much for the detail, which will be very helpful in replicating your success.  I will forward this to my Mom and Brother, in Indiana and Maine, who will also greatly appreciate your help with this.  I am sending them HCs to try.

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b



Subject: Which cuttings are easy to start and hard to start Replies: 7
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,183
 
Well said Jason.

I read the same things concerning the MB VS and they rooted very easy for us, and where among the strongest growers.

Overall our success rate was about 70% in rooting cuttings, without really doing anything but putting them in the ground and watering when needed.

The Almas were 100% and very strong growers; the Raspberry Lattes from Jon were 100% and were the strongest growers in the entire bed of cuttings.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: DEER WARS Replies: 18
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,266
 
Hi Jason.  I did all my cuttings outside this Spring and summer, just stuck them in the dirt, and got about a 70% success rate with rooting.

To label the rows of fig cuttings, I had taken down a mulberry tree, so I used sticks of that cut mulberry tree to hold the labels for the rows of fig cuttings and stuck the mulberry sticks in the ground as label markers.  The mulberry sticks rooted too!

I know Spring and Summer are best for rooting, but every year I bury low lying fig branches, and by Spring, they are well rooted.  So who knows, it might work, and either way, it took me one minute to do and cost nothing, so there really is nothing to lose.

It was discouraging to see the deer attack on a fig I cared for all summer, but the best solution to a problem is to turn the problem into a benefit.  So I took the pieces, and may end up with several trees by Spring.

I don't hunt either, but hopefully the people that do can thin the herd a little.  The deer laugh at the local dogs.

Best wishes.

John

Subject: DEER WARS Replies: 18
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,266
 
Not such a long, long, time ago (two nights ago), in an orchard not so far away (our backyard) . . .

DEER WARS

As you can see, two nights ago "Deerth Vader" took a light saber to one of our figs.  I sprayed all of them with a natural repellant that works well (rotten eggs; hot peppers; garlic), and that should solve the problem.

The weird thing is that they don't bother the figs except this time of year, when the Evil Emper-Deer and the rest of the Sith Deers come from the dark side of the forest to eat the bark off the younger figs (what antler-holes).

I picked up the pieces and planted them at the base (second picture).  I will let you know if any of them root.  I know it's a long shot, but nothing ventured nothing gained, and the main fig will come back next Spring anyway.  It was either that or throw them away, so I gave it a try.

May the Force be with you fellow figgers . . .

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b




Attached Images
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Subject: propagate sukers. Replies: 25
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,679
 
Hi Eve.  My Mom wants to grow a fig in Northern Indiana (Zone 5; and my brother back in Bangor too; also Zone 5), neither of which is colder than Buffalo I would think.

She would prefer in-ground if possible.  She has a south-facing brick wall which would help, and I am giving her a large plastic rain barrel (rain barrel in summer; fig cover in winter).

Heavily mulched and covered with the rain barrel, do you think she can make it through the winter in Zone 5?

What do you do to prepare your HC for winter there near Buffalo?

Thanks.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Overwintering figs in Pittsburgh Replies: 5
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 905
 
Hi Matt.  That is a great article.  I enjoyed reading it.  Thanks.

With some imagination, planning, and effort, seems there is almost nothing that people can't do.

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b



Subject: propagate sukers. Replies: 25
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,679
 
Hi Jason.  My Hardy Chicago has an odd growth habit.  It is very upright and small.  The taste and productivity are excellent, but I'm not certain it's actually a HC, but may be a related variety.  You are welcomed to a cutting but it doesn't have suckers near the base like most figs.

I have other figs that do have branches at the base, I'm pretty sure I can find you a good one to "trial"!

Best wishes.

John

Subject: propagate sukers. Replies: 25
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,679
 
Hi Northeastnewbie.  We are 7b here in the Georgia Piedmont, but close to 8a, so it is a different climate. 

And I would think that while technically the same Zone, Zone 7 in New Jersey is different than Zone 7 in Georgia in overall climate, as the Zone system describes average minimum temperatures annually, not average daily temperatures.  We get some cold weather, and chilly nights here, but there are also a lot of warm days throughout the "winter" and it's usually above freezing most of the time.

If your ground freezes though, plants are not going to do anything till it thaws.  We get a little surface frost and freeze, but a few inches down the soil is moist and unfrozen all winter, so by Spring the branches have rooted.

So I do this every year with the low lying branches already near the ground.  The cost/benefit is very favorable, it costs almost nothing in time and materials and you will get some well rooted branches by Spring without any effort after covering with soil.

Happy holidays my friend.

John


Subject: propagate sukers. Replies: 25
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,679
 
Hi Jason.  That is great news!  Thanks for sharing.  You are very fortunate and have a very, very good baby.  We are still trying to get ours to go to bed at a regular hour and sleep through the night (and they are 12, 10, and 7!)  ;-)

Very best wishes and happy holidays friend.

John

Subject: propagate sukers. Replies: 25
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,679
 
We may be talking about two very different things here Northeasternnewbie.

I'm talking about outdoor in-ground plants in the South, and I'll bet you are referring to figs in pots brought inside up North.

For a fig in a pot, and indoors, air layering would be fine.

But for an in ground fig in a climate where the ground doesnt freeze solid, it's pretty easy covering something with dirt.  No cutting is required, no watering, no plastic bags or growing medium, you just bury the branch and leave it till it roots.

Air layering works best for higher branches, and in the Spring outside, but this time of year I wouldn't recommend air layering outside.  The air temperature will be much colder (and will freeze solid overnight) than the ground temperature a few inches under which won't freeze. 

In a climate where the ground doesn't freeze hard, if you've got some ground level branches, bury them and in the Spring you have new trees.  Done.  Can't get any easier than that.

Best wishes to all.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: propagate sukers. Replies: 25
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,679
 
Hey Jason!  How are you doing my friend.

Trust that you and the family are doing well.

Best wishes.

John

Subject: propagate sukers. Replies: 25
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,679
 
Hi.  I do this every year.

Those smaller branches that are under the plant running near along the ground, just bury the middle sections of the branches in some soil over winter, and at least in our climate (Zone 7b), by Spring they have a strong root system developed, you can cut and separate them from the mother plant and grow or give them away to family, friends and neighbors.

If they are not easy to bury a few inches, cut some pieces of heavy wire to make "U" shaped hoops to hold them down and/or add some additional good quality soil on top.

It is definately the easiest and most certain way to propogate, but only works for branches growing near the ground for obvious reasons.

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Winter Garden Replies: 20
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,351
 

p.s.  There is nothing that couldn't be fixed or cured with olive oil, baking soda, vinegar, bailing twine, or duct tape!  ;-)


Subject: Winter Garden Replies: 20
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,351
 
Hi Martin.  My family were immigrants too (Eastern Europe), and gardening and self-sufficiency were just the way they lived.  And even when they didn't have much, they always had plenty of healthy home-grown food for everyone, fresh from the garden or canned, and nothing ever went to waste:

"Use it up - Wear it out - Make it do!"

They lived a good and happy life with far less than people have today, and they felt blessed to have it.

Hope you are well my friend.

John




 

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