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Subject: Gino's fig and Improved Celeste Pixes Replies: 10
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 2,167
 
Hi Herman.  Hope you are well my friend.

That Gino looks beautiful, a real winner.  And a must have for next year's list.

I got some Celeste cuttings from you this Spring.  They are doing very well thank you.  In fact all of the cuttings we got from you are doing great.  Most are up to 3 feet tall starting from cuttings in Spring.

Do you happen to recall whether the Celeste cuttings your sent were regular Celeste, improved Celeste or some other strain?

I'm putting together a little book with as many details as I can find about each variety we are growing so I will remember in the future if others ask.

Hope you are having a good summer.

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Farmer's trick Replies: 2
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 628
 
I've heard mixed reviews on the Irish Spring, at least concerning deer, but not all animals are the same, even among the same species, so if it works for you it works.

We had an unfortunate snake incident a few months ago (one got under the house) and the guy who came and got him for us (I'm brave but not that brave) told us that moth balls help deter snakes.  Snakes are also said to hate clove and cinnamon, so we went with the clove and cinnamon as we try to have as few chemicals around as possible.  And so far no more snakes, and our crawl space smells like pumpkin pie.

We have have very good success with "Deer Off" (I think that's what it's called) an all natural spray made from rotten eggs, garlic, and hot peppers.  It smells pretty bad right at first, but the deer won't touch anything sprayed with it.

Best wishes.

John

Subject: i have no willpower Replies: 7
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 564
 
Thanks Mike.  Good to hear further confirmation that the MBVS truly is an outstanding variety.

I have started a lot of these, to share with friends and family, and I am planting a fig hedge.  It will have lots of varieties, but several MBVS fig trees for fresh eating and for making fig jam.

I am making some more fig jam today, but with Hardy Chicagos and Marseilles.

I am using Herman's recipe, just figs, sugar, and lemon, and that is all, no added pectin or anything else.  It is outstanding.

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Violet de Bodreaux Replies: 18
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,660
 
I ordered our VDB from Raintree Nursery in Washington State.

It has the very long thin leaves like the Edible Landscaping variety.

I just planted it this Spring, but it's up to a solid yard tall with multiple branches and a couple dozen figs set.  It showed signs of FMV earlier in the summer but bounced back strong.

I'm going to get a digital camera so I can share pictures as well (yes I know; I'm not Amish but I might as well be).

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: My EL.Sals Replies: 7
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 806
 
Hi Martin.  Do you have an opinion on which variety of Sals is the best?

Best wishes.

John

Subject: My Hardy Chicago Replies: 3
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 665
 
Great pictures as always Martin.

I have read that Sal's is a heavier producer than Hardy Chicago.

Our Hardy Chicago has been producing very heavy though.

Your's looks like it has set a good quantity of fruit also.

Best wishes.

John

Subject: Dark Portuguese Replies: 12
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,536
 
Thank you Martin.

Figs have been grown for thousands of years, and yet it's amazing how little information is available on growing figs.

That is what is great about this Forum.  One can learn a great deal here from more experienced growers.

There are two ways to learn: Through studying the experiences of others or the hard way (making lots of mistakes yourself).

Obvioulsy, the former is much better than the latter.

I learn a great deal everytime I visit the Forum.

Thank you Martin, and everyone.

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Georgia Fig from 1800s Replies: 12
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,463
 
Celeste and Marseilles, although your Marseilles looks greener and smaller than ours. 

Try letting the Marseilles ripen up a little more and see if you like them better that way.  We let ours get dead ripe, ready to fall ripe, and then they are very sweet and good flavored.  A little weak when not fully ripe.

The Celestes have a richer flavor, but it takes a look of those to make jam or anything else.  Our Marseilles are the size of small apples.

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Black Jack Replies: 8
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,141
 
Hi Jason.  I have some really nice Hardy Chicagos from cuttings I got from Herman (thank you Herman).  Let me know if you need one Jason.

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: It's actually not another Brown Turkey! Replies: 12
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,378
 
Hi Jason.  Do you think the recent heavy rains here might have thrown the taste off?

I will eat most any fig and like it, but I would say that our figs have been pretty watery since the heavy rains.  We have gotten at least 3 inches in the last week over here in Northeast Georgia, but it looks like Atlanta has been getting some pretty heavy rain too.

It really doesn't look like any of the Brown Turkeys I've seen, far too dark.

Hope you are well my friend.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Yet another mystery fig Replies: 9
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,316
 
Hi Jason.  Hope you are well my friend.

While I most certainly defer to my far more experienced colleagues, I think you can rule out Italian Honey/Lattarula/Marseilles fig.  We have a mature one of these, and the fig you have is very different.  Ours are much bigger, and have a more amber interior, more greenish skin, and a more closed eye.

A great find though, and I can't wait to see what others think it might be.

Do you think it's worth propogating in the area, or just average?

Hope you're having a good season there in Atlanta.

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Iranian white Replies: 14
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,430
 
Hi Bass.  The Iranian White definately looks like a real winner.

Thanks for your great work in finding all these very interesting and promising varieties.

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Trying Drying Figs??? Replies: 8
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 2,568
 
Try making some fig preserves as well.

I made some today, using Herman's simple recipe: Figs, sugar, lemon, and that is all.

The good news was it was amazingly delicious. 

But the bad news is, I can't stop eating it!  ;-)

Best wishes to all.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: What cultivar you love,and wich one you dislike and the reason behind it? Replies: 7
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,012
 
Fantastic thread Herman, and thanks to everyone for the information.

I am learning a lot already from this thread.

Best wishes to all.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Russian fig researcher Replies: 16
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 2,344
 
Hi Losluna.  What zone are you in, and how much cold do you think the Zumwalt fig could take?

My mother has always dreamed of growing figs, but she lives in zone 5 (in the Chicago region but not any where near the lake).

She is getting older, so growing figs in ground would be much easier for her.  She has a good south facing cement block wall too, so that would help.

But I am looking for the most cold hardy varieties to plant for her.

Best wishes.

John

Subject: Russian fig researcher Replies: 16
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 2,344
 
Frozen Joe: No.

Bass is just the luckiest man in the world.  ;-)

Best wishes to all.

John

Subject: Russian fig researcher Replies: 16
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 2,344
 
Hi Bass.  We have several unusual fruiting plants from Russia and Ukraine.  They are very serious about agriculture there, and they are exploring promising new plants.  A most wise course of action, both exploring new plants and expanding genetic diversity of current food plants.

Hope you are well my friend.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Florea Replies: 12
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,127
 
After waiting all winter and spring for a ripe fig, this very early fig is sure to be a welcome treat.

Best wishes to all.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: The effect of pinching,on Marseilles vs Black Replies: 6
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,077
 
Hi Herman. 

Thanks for the great picture and information.  Your research on figs is most helpful to us all. 

I have been pinching back the growth tips on our figs this season with great results, more fruit, bigger fruit, and quicker ripening.

The Marseilles Blacks we got from you are doing great.  We had very high success rates with the cuttings you sent, and the plants from this Springs cuttings are already up to 3 feet tall.  I started pinching these back too though to encourage bushier plants and encourage hardening of the new wood to better withstand the coming cold weather.

Thank you again Herman, your efforts are greatly appreciated, and I always enjoy reading your posts.

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Hybrid Torch (no figs, but still beautiful) Replies: 9
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 857
 
Hi Ken.  Plants really are amazing.

So many people go through their lives, just walking past them, and not even realizing the great joy and benefits that plants bring to us.

For example, we have had much greater success using herbal treatments for common ailments, and they don't have the high cost or bad side-effects of drugs.

Among the reasons we are growing figs is that figs are extremely healthy, loaded with anti-oxidants, vitamins, minerals, and healthy fibers.

Hope you are having a great summer Ken.

Best wishes to all.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Hybrid Torch (no figs, but still beautiful) Replies: 9
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 857
 
Those are amazing Ken.  Incredibly vivid color.

Thanks for sharing these great pictures.

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Mislabeled Fig Tree Replies: 9
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 917
 
Hi Jason.  That is very kind of you my friend, thank you.

I actually got a really nice Celeste from a local peach farmer, but I do greatly appreciate the thought.

The "Celeste" that I think turned out to be a Latturalla has very large green/light yellow figs with amber flesh.  They are actually excellent tasting.

I also got a great looking Latarulla from Ed (thanks Ed), but this one has a reddish flesh.  A beautiful fig and already digging in with some strong growth.

Hope you are having a great summer Jason.  I have some cuttings from Lebanon I am testing out, so far they are very vigorous growers, and the mother tree's figs will be ripe probably next week.  If it's a winner I will let you know.

Best wishes to all.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Salem Dark Replies: 13
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 3,708
 
Hi Nelson.  I'm pretty new at this too, and yes it's been some work.

But this morning, I went down to the fig orchard, and there were lots of BTs, Italian Honeys, and Chicago Hardys super ripe and ready to eat.

And as I tasted the Italian Honey (which was unbelievably good) and picked a bunch to take into the kids (we have three boys ages 7 to 11), I thought: "This is definately worth the effort!"  ;-)

Can't wait to get home!

Subject: Mislabeled Fig Tree Replies: 9
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 917
 
Jon knows his figs, so I'm sure he's right.

Just wanted to tell you I bought a "Celeste" that turned out to be a Lattarulla.

Now if we can just find a guy who bought a "Black Mission" and it turned out to be a Celeste, we can all trade and everyone will be happy.  ;-)

Actually, as long as it's not one you already have, and you like it, it's a good fig.

Subject: Salem Dark Replies: 13
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 3,708
 
Sounds like a real winner Nelson.  Hope all your figs are doing this well and that you are having a great summer there in Toronto.

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Salem Dark Replies: 13
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 3,708
 

Thanks for sharing these great pictures Nelson.

Best wishes.

John

Subject: Salem Dark Replies: 13
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 3,708
 
Hi Bass.  My Salem Dark is doing well also.

Also, the growth of the Brooklyn White you sent me has been very impressive for a new plant.  The Mavra Sika is doing well too.

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Brooklyn White breba Replies: 11
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,661
 
Hi Bass.  You clearly have many virtues my friend, but I was pretty sure beautiful hands was not one of them!  ;-)

Best wishes.

John

Subject: Watering in drought? Replies: 4
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 597
 

I would also suggest heavy mulching around your tree.  That will help slow down moisture loss and a fine, heavy mulch can help keep the water from running off as you water.


Subject: The Birds Replies: 19
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 898
 
"Axier's way might work on his birds but not on my mockingbirds. They have an engineering degree."

Hi Gene.  So far, a simple net is working just fine against our mockingbirds.  Our mockingbirds must have gotten their engineering degrees from Purdue! [rim-shot]

(sorry; but as an IU grad I couldn't resist).

John

Subject: Brooklyn White breba Replies: 11
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,661
 
Hi Bass. Thanks for the information.  With our long warm summers here in the North Georgia Piedmont, these figs are going to be wonderful.  And since our families are from Brooklyn, this is the perfect fig for us.

Hope you are well my friend.

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Brooklyn White breba Replies: 11
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,661
 

Whoops, bumped the "post message" too soon.

Best wishes Bass.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Brooklyn White breba Replies: 11
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,661
 
Hi Bass.  Looks great.  Is this the mother plant for the Brooklyn White you sent me?  Hope so, because this looks like a great fig.

Best wishes

Subject: First birds, now heat?? Replies: 9
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 826
 
Wow.  "Rock Lobster" that does take me back a bit.  I'm often "heading down the Atlanta Highway" but just going to Atlanta, not the "Love Shack." 

Athens is actually a pretty cool place.  I'm a lawyer, so I know lawyers, not musicians, but their lawyer was kind enough to give us a personal tour of the REM headquarters.  Nobody was there at the time, except for staff, but we got to see their "MTV" awards, etc., and the headquarters, a lot of fun.  They sound like really nice guys.  And yes they are still around I hear, along with many other musicians.  It's a pretty big music town, and a great university town.  Great place to live, and except for too hot and too long summers for my taste (I'm originally a Midwesterner) the climate is pretty good 3 out of 4 seasons.

I'm practically Amish when it comes to technology, but I will see if I can get my wife to post some pictures of the garden fence.

Best wishes to all.

John



Subject: First birds, now heat?? Replies: 9
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 826
 
Hi Martin. 

In our area, the deer practicely fight you for the groceries on the way into the house.  So after some considerable frustration (and a few choice words here and there), I finally built a 50x40 foot 7.5 feet tall chicken wire fence around our garden with a gate.  It's the best thing I ever built by far and works great.  I think it cost me about $700 total, but it could be done for less by buying less expensive materials (I used black pvc covered "deer fence" chicken wire and black steel poles ordered on the Internet; with some nice cedar posts bought locally for corners), but it works great and actually looks pretty good too.

I'm probably going to go with a long tunnel frame with bird netting to protect the fig hedges.

Best wishes to all.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: First birds, now heat?? Replies: 9
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 826
 
Two plagues down, that means you only have eight more to go . . .

But seriously, it probably is due to lack of water.  I had this and Jon suggested heavy watering.  I did and the fruit drop stopped.

Or . . . maybe next it's locusts, then lice, and and then flaming hail . . .

Subject: Commercial Home Fig Orchard Possible? Replies: 14
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,452
 
Hi Joe.  You could also consider some easy artisan specialty items like growing herbs (which should grow well in Arizona) and making herb flavored vinegars in nice bottles.  Very pretty, a nice healthy flavoring for cooking and at the table, and they keep well for sale.  We don't sell these, but do them as gifts.  Figs could be a main item; but if you had a couple secondary items to make a double or triple sale to customers, they get some good quality stuff and you make more money.  Everyone is happy.

Best wishes for happiness and success in your move and new venture.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Fig dieback in winter Replies: 4
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 666
 
Hi Michael.  I don't know your growing zone and local climate, but here in our orchard (zone 7b; North Georgia Piedmont) we grow all of our figs in ground, and expect them to die back to the ground the first few years.

But they always bounce back stronger each year until they become aclimated and establish a solid hard wood base to grow from.

In colder areas though, it may be necessary to protect the figs more aggressively, or in even colder areas, to grow the figs in pots and take them inside in the winter.

Let everyone know your general location and some one local can give you growing advice and details.

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Commercial Home Fig Orchard Possible? Replies: 14
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,452
 
Hi Ken.  I read an article about a guy in South Florida who sells papayas.  He's retired, and the extra cash is very helpful no doubt.  And sounds like he is having a lot of fun with it as well.

Nobody gets rich selling home grown produce, but if you're having fun growing it, and like to get out and talk with people at farmers markets, etc., the extra cash is just a plus.

Hope you are well my friend.

John


Subject: Commercial Home Fig Orchard Possible? Replies: 14
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,452
 
Hi Joe.  You're not going to get rich, but I would think you could make some money doing this as a seasonal hobby/business. 

Most hobbies lose money, but this one could make a little I would think. 

All depends on your local market, but if you have a city nearby, or immigrants from places that actually understand and appreciate good food, you could sell figs.

I'm planting my figs in a hedge for easy maintenance; efficient use of space; etc.  I will let you know how it's going, but so far so good.

You could sell fresh figs in season, and also make some fig jam with the ones you couldn't sell for sale out of season.

But if this is something you really want to do, don't ever let anybody tell you you can't do anything you want to do in life.  History is full of famous people who were told they couldn't do whatever they are now famous for.

You're probably not going to get famous selling figs either, but you will have some fun, and will probably make a little money if you put your mind to it.

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Help for novice Replies: 3
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 637
 
Newbie is right.  I started with just a few, and now I have over 30 different varieties.  So run, now, before it's too late!  ;-) 

Just kidding of course.  It's actually a very fun and rewarding hobby.  And unlike many other hobbies it is productive and good for your health.

Your wife made some good choices, and you will have a lot of fun with these.  And once you taste the first fully ripe fig you grew yourself, there's no turning back my friend.  Enjoy!

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Atreano picked this morning Replies: 9
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,022
 
I seem to recall that one Atreano strain is better tasting than others.

Does anyone know which Atreano strain is the best?

Thanks.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: You Cover Your Figs I Cover???????? Replies: 19
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,737
 
We like the clover too, and don't even mind the dandelions.

I've never even heard of waterweed, but I'm sure it's not good.

What drives us crazy here is a tough, highly invasive grass that spreads by underground roots (like bamboo) and strangles out everything else.  I was told the English brought this grass from India and planted it here to feed cattle back when this was an English colony, and everyone has been trying to keep it from taking over their gardens ever since.  We call it "wire grass" or "King George's Revenge."  We were able to get rid of the English, but their grass will apparently torment us forever.

Hope you have a great summer Vivian.

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: You Cover Your Figs I Cover???????? Replies: 19
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,737
 
Hi Vivian.  Clovers have the ability to capture free nitrogen from the atmosphere and fix it into the soil, thereby improving the soil and making the nitrogoen biologically available to other plants (including figs!).

But to do this, the clover plants work in a symbiotic relationship with bacteria.  If you dig up a healthy clover plant you can actually see little nodules (tiny bumps) on the clover roots where the bateria are at work.  The "innoculent" is a dry, powdered bacteria that you mix in with the clover seed before planting.  Iti's inexpensive, you don't need much, and you can usually find it in a small bag right next to the clover seed in a local garden store (or order it online).  I'm not sure it's absolutely necessary to add the innoculent, as there could already be suitable bacteria in your local soil for the clover to partner with, but it's cheap insurance so I always use it when planting clover seed to improve soil quality and fertility.

Amounts vary of course, but in some studies nitrogen fixed by acre per year ranged from 70 to 275 pounds per acre.  Over the years, that's a lot of free, organic, bio-available nitrogen for your plants for very little intitial investment.  I think I spent about 25 dollars all together, and you may not need 10 pounds of clover seed.  We mixed the clover seed and innoculent in with the grass seed when we overseeded in the fall.  It ended up great, an easy care, soil improving, healthy organic lawn and orchard grass with pretty little clover flowers scattered here and there, but the pure grass lawn purests have probably fainted by now if they are reading this.

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: LSU figs and FMV Replies: 7
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 828
 
This is only antidotal of course, but our LSU Purple shows no signs of any disease at all, and is growing and fruiting very vigorously, even though we just planted it this Spring.  If the fruit has a good taste (we will see soon), and it holds up the Zone 7b weather (it's in ground and we don't cover anything) the LSU Purple looks like a real winner.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: You Cover Your Figs I Cover???????? Replies: 19
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,737
 
"Isn't it so satisfying to create rich, loose, friable soil where there wasn't any?"

Hi Vivian.  It really is.  There is something almost magical about starting with barren ground and creating a rich, healthy, thriving mini eco-system.  In 10 years we have seen our property go from rock hard abused clay with one dead tree and nothing else but scattered weeds, to a thriving oasis of healthy life from the earthworms in the ever darkening and richer soil to the many birds that now call our many beautiful trees home.  And while I sometimes have mixed feelings about the birds (when they are eating our fruit) they too are part of the blessing of life that comes with improving your soil. 

We have also planted dutch clover everywhere from the orchard to the lawn.  Lawn purests would recoil in horror at that, but we use no chemicals, including no chemical fertilizers, and the dutch clover has done an amazing job of pulling free nitrogen from the air and putting it into the soil, and helping to break up and enrich the soil.  We now have a good mix of grass and clover that is transforming the whole property back to healthy soil at a very low cost.  A 10 pound bag of clover seed and a little innoculent has done amazing things, and we have some very happy bees as well.

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b


Subject: Who's tried King or Desert King in the South? Replies: 16
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,453
 
Hi Mike.  All of our figs freeze back to the ground the first few years, but then they seem to acclimate and establish a hard wood base that holds up pretty well even here in the North Georgia Piedmont.  So hopefully in a few years you can just let them go and still enjoy the brebas.

Our established figs include an Italian Honey, a Chicago Hardy, and LSU purple & gold, and something that was sold to us as a BT but may be some variety of celeste (it's pretty good at dropping its fruit; so good I'm about to take it out).  And I have over 25 other varieties I'm raising from cuttings or small quart sized plants we bought.  We got some great cuttings from Jon and Herman, and some great plants from Bass.

We had nice brebas from the Italian Honey and the Hardy Chicago, not many but good.  And the main crops look really good.

I'm very interested in hearing about how your figs are doing there in Gainesville.  I have a good friend there, and I'm going to send him a fig tree or two.  He's not much of a gardener, so I'm going to tree to send him the easiest and best for the area.

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Who's tried King or Desert King in the South? Replies: 16
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,453
 
Hi CKB.  I have a cutting in ground but still very small, so it's too soon for me to tell, but hope others can tell you about the Desert King's performance down here.

One that looks like a real winner is the Excel.  The first main crop is still maturing, but it's growth is very vigorous, healthy, and it set a very heavy crop for a young plant.  The LSU Purple is also looking very good, but again, no ripe figs yet for taste.

Hope others can give us suggestions for the best varieties in the South.

Best wishes to all.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: You Cover Your Figs I Cover???????? Replies: 19
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,737
 
Hi Vivian.  There is a product marketed as "Clay Buster" here in Georgia, and we have used it.  It's basiclly just tiny pine bark pieces.  Works fine, but also check the prices against other sources of pine bark fines at Lowes, Home Depot, etc.  Any organic matter will work fine to help break up the clay, and the more you can put in the ground the better.  If you are adding a lot of pine bark though, consider adding some lime or wood ashes as well occassionally to help balance out the acidity of the pine bark.  Some people check ph alot, we really don't.  And for 20 years that has worked just fine.  But we do add a little wood ashes and lime here and there, along with all the leaves, wheat straw, home made compost, etc., we can get.  The more organic matter the better.

Best wishes.

John

North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: You Cover Your Figs I Cover???????? Replies: 19
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,737
 
I have zero experience with desert soil, but I would think that no matter what the problem, more organic matter is a good solution.

As the soil gets better, the earthworm populations increase dramatically, which also helps to speed up the process.

 

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