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Subject: You Cover Your Figs I Cover???????? Replies: 19
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,737
 
Hi Gene and Paul.  Building good soil is like building a bank account, but maybe even better.  I grew up in Northen Indiana, were the soil as amazing, rich black top soil on top of peat moss bogs.  So when we moved to Georgia, the rock hard red clay was pretty discouraging, but with some time and effort, you really can dramatically improve your soil.

Like Gene, I am very happy to haul away the neighbors leaves, and Paul is making the desert bloom with what others discard.  In the hands of a real gardener, lowly manure and yard waste become rich black good in the garden.

Hope you are having a great summer.

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: A Few More Pics Replies: 14
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,563
 
Thanks Sal!  Wow!  The MBVS and LSU really are beautiful together!  I think I'm going to make that my screen-saver!

And thanks for the picture and info on the MBVS Gene.

I really, really can't wait!

Best wishes to all.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: This mornings harvest and other ramblings. Replies: 13
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 918
 
Thanks for sharing the great pictures and story Gene.

You are quite a bit ahead of us here in the North Georgia Piedmont.  We have had a couple brebas, but it will still be a couple weeks at least before the main crops start coming in.

Figs with a glass of tea are great also.  Try some figs with a glass of wine, some good crusty bread, and Parmasano Regiano. 

Hope you are having a good summer.

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Negronne Breba Replies: 8
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,276
 
That looks fantastic Bass!  Thanks for sharing this great picture.

I have a lot of work ahead of me in establishing the fig orchard in the next year, but whenever I get tired or discouraged I will think of that picture!

Best wishes to all.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Mavra Sika Pictures (young plant) Replies: 6
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,227
 
Hi Bass.  The Mavra Sika was a great find and we are very happy to be growing one.  It's a beautiful fig and it looks great tasting as well.  Ours is doing well here and we hope to have a few figs next year.

Hope you are well my friend, and best wishes to all.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Atreano Main Crop Replies: 31
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,739
 
Thank you Herman.  The fig was greatly appreciated, and I also greatly appreciate your helping me with a positive identification of this fig.  It is doing great here, and your kindness is much appreciated.

Thank you my friend.

John

Subject: Mavra Sika Pictures (young plant) Replies: 6
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,227
 
Good to know.  Thank you.

Two more Greek words I know now.

And that makes a total of . . . well, two!  ;-)

Best wishes.

John

Subject: Off Replies: 13
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,065
 
Sorry to hear about this Matt.

Hope it still recovers, and it very well may with a little extra care.  In a month or two hopefully it will look as good as new.

And at least the yellow jackets didn't get you.  That could have been a far more serious problem.

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: A Few More Pics Replies: 14
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,563
 
Hi Sal and Martin.

I am getting some serious fig envy here.  Those figs look fantastic.  Imagine a bowl of MBVS and LSU Gold together: Beautiful!

Thanks for sharing these great pictures, and please do let us know what you think of the taste.  I have MBVS and LSU Gold plants, but they are new this year.  Maybe some figs next year with some luck!  ;-)

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b 

Subject: Sals Black Unknown (young plant ) Replies: 4
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 574
 
Thank you Sal.

In truth, we are here but a short time compared to what we can leave behind, including some great figs for our children, grandchildren, and all the kids present and future.

We are having great fun growing the figs, but the most fun is getting the kids interested in gardening, and teaching them to grow their own food.  I have found that if kids grow it, kids will enjoy eating it, even brocolli.

And the kids that try them love figs, so when the figs are ripe, we get every kid in the area out here to try them, and then hopefully some of them will want to grow them as well.  More good food and more good health for everyone.

For my grandparents, if they didn't grow it, they didn't eat it, there was no supermarket and no food factory/mega-agri-business.  It may be for our grandchildren this could also be the case, but if we prepare them now, no matter what happens they will be happy and healthy.

In the meantime, we are having some great fun growing the figs with the kids.  And it's even better when I have a story to tell them about where the figs came from, and the people who got the figs from there to here.

Best wishes to all.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: You Cover Your Figs I Cover???????? Replies: 19
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,737
 
If you really want to see some poor soil, come to the North Georgia Piedmont.  It was no doubt good soil hundreds of year ago, but centuries of growing cotton, poor soil management, and then the top soil was gone, leaving little but rock hard red clay that would barely grow weeds.

But what I want to tell everyone is that even if you start with soil that poor, you can greatly improve your soil with some time and effort.  After 10 years of adding as much organic matter as we can find, it is starting to look great.  The main garden soil is now brown/black and growing great crops all organically.

One of our main amendments is wheat straw.  We put it down heavy in the Spring to mulch tomatoe, potato, pepper, etc., plants (greatly reduces both weeding and watering) and then till it in every year, along with leaves, compost, wood ashes (not too much of the wood ashes at a time though), etc.

So there is hope, even if you start with poor soil, but good, healthy soil does make all the difference.

Best wishes to all.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: ky. figs Replies: 9
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,349
 
Those look fantastic Mario.  Very beautiful.

What variety do you think these might be?

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Atreano Main Crop Replies: 31
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,739
 
Hi Herman.  You sent me a cutting earlier this Spring.  It is doing great, but sometimes my eyes are not so great.  I wrote "Adriano" on the plant tag, but do you think it was a cutting from your "Atreano" instead?  Both are great figs, but your "Atreano" looks exceptional.

Thank you my friend.

All of the cuttings are doing great.

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Mavra Sika Pictures (young plant) Replies: 6
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,227
 
This is a very interestin fig Martin.

We got one from Bass about a month ago or so, it's in ground, and looking good so far.  Can't wait to get a few figs too, hopefully next season.

Great pictures.  Thanks.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Sals Black Unknown (young plant ) Replies: 4
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 574
 
Thanks for sharing this Martin.  A great plant and a wonderful family story with it.  One of the things I love about figs is that they are the perfect family heirloom plant, passing the exact same fig down through countless generations of family and friends.

I am growing a really interesting and very promising fig from Lebanon, and as it matures I will keep everyone posted as well.  My friend's father brought it with him as a long stick he cut from their family home in Lebanon.

Hope you are well my friend.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Atreano Main Crop Replies: 31
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,739
 
Hi Herman.  I'm going to have to add an Atreano to my wish list.

The cuttings you sent are doing great, and many are now well over 2 feet tall and look very healthy.

Hope all is well with you.

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Two must-have figs for the South Replies: 11
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 923
 
I have avoided the Lemon, etc., because I had read about the relatively open eye, as in the hot humid South souring is a big issue.  We have an Italian Honey, which is a large light green/yellow fig with pink/amber inside that has done pretty well here in Zone 7b, and would probably even like it a little warmer.  You're most welcome to some cuttings if you want.

We have a new Violette de Bordeux, and all we know so far is that it is a strong grower here, and is setting fruit pretty heavy its first year in ground.   I have heard the flavor is quite good as well, and we hope to find out soon.

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Bird Ribbon Your Thoughts??? Replies: 8
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,164
 

Our birds were slow learners: The fake Hawk worked for about a week.


Subject: Question on pinching figs Replies: 3
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 848
 
Hi Ottawan.  Just so I have this right too, you would do this: 1) So that the lower part would focus its energy on ripening the figs; and 2) So that the upper part could root and you would then have two plants?

Sorry to be so concrete, but before I do this too I wanted to make sure I had it straight.

Hope you are well my friend.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Two must-have figs for the South Replies: 11
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 923
 
Thanks Tim.  It really was an easy method of rooting.

I had about 70% success, without really trying much.  I also built a small chicken wire cage to keep the dogs, cats, and armidillos from digging in the bed, but that was pretty easy too.

My idea was to re-create the growing conditions a new fig would find in nature, which would be under a mother fig.  So I put a well dug bed (about 4 x 8 feet) topped with about 4 inches of good quality light textured soil (lots of organic matter) on the south side of our largest fig (about a 7 foot arching Italian Honey) for midday shade, but the cuttings get lots of full sun in the morning and afternoon.  They are doing well, and I found it a very easy, no stress method.

Can't wait to hear what you think of the MBVS and Texas Giants!

Best wishes.

John

Subject: Two must-have figs for the South Replies: 11
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 923
 
Hi Tim.  I got some really nice MBVS cuttings from Herman, as well as a few other varieties.  Also got some great cutting from Jon and others.  I planted them this Spring (just stuck them in the ground; nothing fancy; well dug spot under a larger fig tree topped with about 4 inches of good quality garden dirt from Lowe's).  They are growing like weeds up over 2 feet now.  Bass has some outstanding plants as well.

What do you think of the taste of the MBVS?  Can't wait to find out.

And have you tried a Texas Blue Giant?  I have one planted, and it looks like a really unique fig.

Best wishes to all.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Two must-have figs for the South Replies: 11
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 923
 
Hi Cbalducc.

I don't know the answer to your main question (the must have figs for the South) but I can't wait to hear the answers from others who do.

As far as I know though, you certainly have two good choices already, the Alma and Celeste.

The LSU fig varieties may also be promising for this climate, but I am anxious to hear what others think.  I have a purple and gold LSU that is a reliable producer, and the Purple LSU has its first crop this year, I also have an LSU gold on the way.  These seem to do well in the South, but so far, I would say any fig does well in the South.  We grow all ours in ground, planting them in good amended soil, and then stand back.  They grow pretty well here.

As far as FMV, it's every where already as far as I know, probably including your current figs.  I have over 25 varieties now (most of them still pretty new).  Probably all of them have it, some show it, most don't, all of them are doing fine even with it.  It's simply part of our world.  We humans have viruses too, and generally, we adapt and move on.  So in general I would focus on doing good things for your plants (good soil; lots of mulch; watering when they need it; etc.).  Healthy plants will fend off diseases the best, and there will always be diseases, fungus, etc., these are part of the natural world.  And if you worry too much about FMV, you will miss out on some of the best varieties to grow.

I wish you great success my friend.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: TASTE RESULTS --- FOLLOW UP Replies: 5
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 784
 
Thanks Lou.

And hope you are well also Martin.

I would like to second all that Martin said, and thank you for sharing these great pictures. Your plants look great Lou.

We are trying to build a nice fig orchard here as well.  At present we have nearly 30 different varieties, but the real holy grail is taste.  So we are always looking for the ultimate fig. 

Productivity is another major plus, and so far our new Excel looks like a winner in this regard.  It even has two figs on one node (now that's just showing off, don't you think?), and is really loaded, especially for a new tree.  We will let you know about the taste when they are ripe, but so far the Excel looks very promising, and is a strong grower here.

Please do keep us posted on your progress Lou, and I will do the same.

Best wishes to all.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Fancy irrigation box cover Replies: 7
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 717
 
That does look great!

And there really is nothing like growing your own.  We just made some blueberry ice cream, and I will make some more tonight.

We are probably getting close to growing about 50% or our own food, all organic of course.  It takes some time and work of course, but it's quality and health benefits you just can't buy.

Best wishes.

John

Subject: Fancy irrigation box cover Replies: 7
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 717
 
That sounds great Paul, and actually quite nice.

Hope you will share your future progress with us as well.

You are quite literally making the desert bloom.

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Fancy irrigation box cover Replies: 7
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 717
 
Thank you for sharing this, it's beautiful.

But also as foreign as the moon to those of us here in the wet (50'' per year average rainfall) and humid Southeast.

I have mixed feelings: I'm not sure I could live without our trees, grass, and wildflowers, but it would definately cut down on the never-ending mowing!  ;-)

Looks great, and I look forward to seeing more.

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: TASTE RESULTS --- FOLLOW UP Replies: 5
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 784
 
Hi Lou.  Thanks for sharing this.  That's the type of moment we all are working towards, everytime you plant a fruit tree.

Do you know where one might find a Black Triano fig tree or cuttings?

And it is fairly cold harder (to zone 7 or so?).

Enjoy my friend!  ;-)

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: a good year for figs Replies: 4
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 815
 
Hi Bass.  That is a fantastic picture!  Thanks for sharing this.  I have never seen such a productive little fig tree.  Is the flavor good on this variety also?

Best wishes to all.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Newbie! Replies: 9
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 853
 
Hi Jon.  I tried a good soaking on our BT which was dropping figs during a really hot, dry spell about a week ago.  After a long thorough soaking, problem solved.  And thankfully it started raining again about 3 days ago.

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Newbie! Replies: 9
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 853
 
Hi Anziana.  Others with more experience may have other suggestions, but seeing none so far, here are a few considerations.

Figs often have 2 crops, the earlier "breba" crop and then the later main crop.  Most of our brebas fall off, but if that is the case with your fig, you should be seeing a second main crop now.  The breba figlets come much earlier.

Also, given the rapid growth, it could be that your plant is focusing on vegetation and dropping the fruit.  The fig is likely getting too big too quick.  And nobody needs a 20+ foot fig.  I would suggest pinching of the growing tips to encourage more bushy growth and greater energy into fruit.

And when all else fails, there's always next year.  Most problem in plants and animals are self-limiting and correcting.  And for those that aren't, there's always replanting.  Gardening isn't like parachuting.  If something goes wrong you get to try again.

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: calling me a liar? Replies: 23
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,915
 
Dear ItalianGirl:

Words of wisdom from the Roman Emperor Marcus Aurelius: "How much more happiness and leisure we would have in our lives if we could just not concern ourselves with what others think and say."

You are clearly among friends here, so not to worry my friend.

Best wishes to all.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Rooting cuttings now? Replies: 14
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,125
 
Thanks Jon and everyone.

The figs from Lebanon are planted in ground here now.  Their father, who unfortunately has pasted away now, brought a stick with him from his family home in Lebanon and planted it here.  I think he would be very happy to know that the tree will be enjoyed by children here, and possibly other places if others want a start, well into the future.

The cuttings looked great, and the mother tree is strong and healthy.  I will keep everyone posted on progress, including pictures.

Best wishes to all.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: First Ripe Italian Honey Breba Zone 7 Replies: 7
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,053
 
Those look fantastic Paul.

Thank you for sharing these great pictures.

Hope your other figs will do well too.

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Rooting cuttings now? Replies: 14
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,125
 
Hi John.  Air layering is a good idea.  But the mother tree is in the yard of people I know a little, but not enough to be conducting any extended agricultural activities in their backyard.  I think they would be happy to give me a cutting, but probably just as soon prefer that I then took the cutting and left!  ;-)

Best wishes to all.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Fig Oiling Replies: 19
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 4,962
 
That is amazing Bass!  And great pictures.

I had never heard of this technique.

And this technique might also prove very useful at the end of the season when there are still some very good figs that may not otherwise ripen and the first frost date is approaching.

Hope all is well with you.

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Enderub brebas Replies: 1
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 639
 
It is courage in the face of the unknown like that Scott, that is the foundation of all culinary progress in the fig world!  ;-)

Great pictures.  Thanks for sharing.  Hope you are having a good season.  So far we have only had  a few brebas, but the maincrops are coming along nicely.

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b



Subject: Rooting cuttings now? Replies: 14
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,125
 
Thank you Jon and Ottawan.  I greatly appreciate your advice on this, and it will help me to have greater confidence in trying this.

And as they say, gardening is not like parachuting.  If something goes wrong, you get to try again.

I will keep everyone posted, and if it's a promising variety I will be happy to share.

I've just started fig hunting in the area, so who knows what I will find (other than several thousand BTs that is!).  ;-)

Best wishes to all.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Rooting cuttings now? Replies: 14
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,125
 
Thanks for sharing this Jason.

This fig (a yet unknown variety they were growing in Lebanon) seems to be doing well here in Georgia, so if it ends up being a variety you might like to try, I will be happy to send you some cuttings as soon as I can.

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Rooting cuttings now? Replies: 14
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,125
 
Thanks Ken.  I just wanted to hear what others with more experience thought, so I appreciate your input on this.

I'm pretty sure I'm going to go for it.

Worst case scenario and it doesn't root, I will just see if I can talk them out of another cutting next Spring, and I'm pretty sure they won't care either way.  They were trying to give away the figs there were so many, so giving away some cuttings should be a pretty easy sale.  And they are very nice people too.  I will also offer to share cuttings from any of my varieties they may want also, more figs for everyone. 

With any luck, I will have my own plant by next Spring, and possibly maybe even a new variety or variant to share with others in a couple years.  It sounds like a winner so far, and I don't recognize it (but others might; we will see).  I will let everyone know what I end up with, and if it's promising I will share.

To give the cuttings a little extra chance in the less than ideal hot summer conditions, I think I'm going to try some longer cuttings in ground, and in shade, and watch them closely for proper moistore because of the heat this time of year.

In general figs seem to root pretty easy.  So I am optimistic even this time of year.  Mulberries are a related plant that also roots very easily.  I had a White Mulberry tree that I cut down in late Winter, because no one liked the fruit, and then I used it for stakes in the garden this Spring because they were nice straight sticks (some of you already know what happened at this point, right?).

Yes, the mulberry stakes rooted and leafed out.  I keep stripping off the leaves, and they just keep popping back out.

Best wishes to all.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: pinching 1st yr cuttings Replies: 7
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 952
 
Thanks for the question Kerry.  I was just getting ready to ask the same thing.

And thank you for the answers Ottawan and Suzi.

I have dozens of in ground started first year cuttings that are just passing or approaching the two foot mark and the protective chicken wire cage they are in (to protect them from digging dogs, cats, and armidillos) is about two feet high.  I I think I will pinch them off as they come through the top of the cage to encourage a stouter tree and keep them from ending up tangled in the chicken wire at the end of the season.

Best wishes to all.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Rooting cuttings now? Replies: 14
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,125
 
Hi everyone.  I just found a really nice (unknown variety) fig growing here locally.  It's originally from Lebanon (the family is from Lebanon).  It has a very good, highly productive breba crop of large figs that is ripe right now. 

I found it because they told a friend they had more figs than they knew what to do with (and that is a problem I would like to have as well).

I would like to get a start, but what are your success rates with rooting cuttings this time of year?  Can I try to root cuttings now or should I wait till next Spring?  And while I'm sure I can get cuttings now, who knows in Spring?  People move, etc.

Hope everyone is well.

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b



Subject: New fig tree found - look at brebas! Replies: 13
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,360
 
Hi Jason.  I have no idea what it is, but I just wanted to say this is a very cool find, and fun to see.  Thanks for sharing this.

Hope you are well my friend.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Help me understand Brown Turkey fig behavior? Replies: 4
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 651
 
Hi Ken, hope you are well.

And Nicholas, here in Zone 7b, our newly planted in ground figs tend to freeze back to the ground the first few years, until they develop a solid wood base to overwinter.  And then after a few years they start growing much stronger and producing good.  Not much the first few years though, and they freeze completely to the ground.  But they always spring back from the roots.  I would give them as much organic matter as you can around the plants with some heavy mulching, keep them reasonably watered, and then don't worry.  Selecting some good varieties for your area is key though.  If you have a plant that won't do well in your climate you are fighting a losing battle.

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Looking At Older Posts Replies: 2
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 643
 
Hi Martin.

My technology skills are about at the Amish level, and our computer is ancient.

But we have ordered a new computer and I will get a digital camara, and then figure out how to use both, so we can post some good pictures from the farm.

I have an Excel with double figs on one node which should make a good picture, and I have a mystery fig as well I will post.

Hope all is well with you.

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: First Ripe Italian Honey Breba Zone 7 Replies: 7
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,053
 
We picked the first ripe Hardy Chicago breba tonight.

Not as good as the main crop, as expected, but the flavor was actually quite good.

Best wishes to all.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: First Ripe Italian Honey Breba Zone 7 Replies: 7
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,053
 
Thank you!!!  We are not exactly high-tech down here on the farm.  We have no digital camara, and we are running a 10 year old archiac computer ("Windows ME"), but we have ordered a new computer and we will also get a camara, and then try to figure out how to use it!  ;-)

But that looks just like ours, so thank you so much for sharing this.  Other than the ripe one was bigger and a little more yellow of course.

We got the Italian Honey by accident, but we have really enjoyed it.  Hope you have too.

I checked this morning and the first Chicago Hardy breba is starting to ripen up as well.

Hope yours are ripe soon too, and that you have a great growing season.

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: New Fig? Replies: 4
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 743
 
If you search "Ty Ty" and start reading customer reviews, it doesn't take too long to determine that this is not the place to buy any figs, unless you just want to buy a mystery fig at high prices.  They seem to be selling whatever it is you are buying, whether it's actually that or not.

I"m not trying to be unkind, it's just that I don't want to see people wasting their money when there are other far more reputable options.  I decided several years ago I'm not buying what they were selling, including the flourescent "blue figs."

Best wishes to all.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: First Ripe Italian Honey Breba Zone 7 Replies: 7
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,053
 
Thank you Rafed.  Hope you are having a good season also.

The main crops look very good, and the main crop on our Italian Honey usually starts ripening about a month from now, so there's really not that much time difference between the brebas and the main crop.

Our Italian Honey was supposed to be a "Celeste" but clearly it's not.  We have been very happy with it though, and have given starts to many people.  It is a strong grower and good producer.  And the figs are the size of small apples.  And because of the light green/yellow skin, the birds don't bother the figs on the Italian Honey.

The Italian Honeys are very good to eat right off the tree, and especially good for anything you need large quantities of figs for, drying, jam, etc., as these large figs add up really quickly when picking.

Keep us posted on progress there in Zone 6 my friend, and best wishes for good health and a good growing season.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: First Ripe Italian Honey Breba Zone 7 Replies: 7
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,053
 
Hi everyone.  We just picked our first ripe Italian Honey breba here in the North Georgia Piedmont.  I wish I had a picture (I'm working on that) but it was very large and not bad for a breba.  Nothing like the main crop, but certainly welcomed in June.  The BTs and LSUs lost all their brebas as far as I can tell, and the Hardy Chicago just has a few which should be ripe soon.

But the Italian Honey came through first, and was pretty good overall.

Hope everyone else is having a good season.

Best wishes to all.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zoine 7b

Subject: Main Crop - Few Pictures Replies: 15
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,324
 
Thank you Martin.  These are fantastic pictures and greatly enjoyed.

Your VioletdeBordeux looks especially healthy.  Mine is growing pretty well but clearly has FMV.  How do you keep yours looking so healthy?

Hope you are enjoying ripe figs soon.

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

 

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