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Subject: losing cuttings Replies: 5
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 704
 
Thank you Ken.  And glad to hear that the only snakes have been the welcomed kind.  We have lived here for 10 years and the rat snake a couple weeks ago was the first one we had seen.  The boys and I (ages 11, 9, and 7), and my wife, are all hoping it will be another 10 years of so before we see any type of snake here again (not big snake fans).

This is my first year growing figs from cuttings, but I have rooted 4 or 5 layered branches together in a clump (held together and pinned down with wire and then covered with potting soil).  I did this late last summer and this Spring I had some really nicely rooted Italian Honey and LSU figs and gave some to neighbors.  It was very easy to untangle these, and they all did very well.  No serious damage in untangling.

But this is still an experient with the cuttings bed.  My plan is to over-winter then in the cuttings bed, with some protection, and then when I am pretty sure the freezing weather is over, put then all in the long hedge bed permanently.   I will prepare the full hedge bed this winter.  I did a short part of the hedge bed already as a test bed with some of the Italian Honeys and LSUs and they are doing great, even setting some nice figs their first year in that location.  So I am hopeful but I will keep you posted on progress.

My general approach to gardening is to try to do things are naturally, simply, and inexpensively as possible, letting the plants do the work when we can.

Hope you are well my friend, and hope your figs are progressiving nicely this year.

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Reasons for short inter-nodes distance- Symptoms of what? Replies: 8
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 838
 
Thanks Jon and Ottawan.

Our technology is pretty primative right now (no digital camera and using a 10 year old computer with Windows ME) but we are going to upgrade soon and I will post a picture.

Hope both of you are well.

Best wishes to all.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Reasons for short inter-nodes distance- Symptoms of what? Replies: 8
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 838
 
I just noticed two tiny figs on one node on my Excel.  It may be common, I just don't know, but I have never noticed this before.  If two tiny figs are on one node should I remove one of them to make room or is this fine?

Best wishes to all.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: losing cuttings Replies: 5
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 704
 
Hi Ken.  Hope you are well.

We used the chicken wire too to keep the dogs, cats, and armidillos from digging up the cuttings.  Especially if you order a few rarer varieties, it doesn't take too much to get several hundred dollars into the cuttings, and having one of these critters throwing a middle of the night digging party in your fig bed would be a pretty awful morning after experience.  That's one of the potential downsides to inground cuttings, but the chicken wire works just fine.

Speaking of critters, hope you have not encountered any more rattle snakes.

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b 

Subject: losing cuttings Replies: 5
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 704
 
Hi Susan.  Sorry to hear this.  And since I don't use the rooting method you are using I will defer to my far more experienced colleagues on this.

I don't know what climate you are in, but if you live in a relatively mild climate (we live in Zone 7b) you could also try rooting some cuttings outside in ground.  Our method was to simulate the actual rooting conditions of a young fig sprouting from the mother plant.  So we dug a nice 4 x 8 bed on the south side of our largest fig, topped it with about 4 plus inches of good store bought garden soil (our soils mostly red clay) and put the cuttings directly in ground.  It's as easy as it gets, there is no transition from inside to outside, they seem to toughen up right away, and we have about 70% success overall.

If you have some extra cuttings next time and a good spot and moderate climate, it may be worth a try.

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Strawberry Figs? Replies: 8
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,222
 
Hi Jon.  Often the name of the family heirloom fig is whatever Grandma called it.

Maybe someone was making a strawberry mix jam with the figs, and everyone just started calling it the strawberry fig.

I've never had a bad fig yet, many different names, colors, shapes, and sizes, all different and all good.

An interesting story Jon.  Thanks for sharing it.

Best wishes to all.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: What are they? Replies: 4
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 713
 
Hi Herman.  Hope you are well.

And Smiles, the first fig I ever bought, a "Celeste" turned out to be an Italian Honey.  It is outstanding though.  And the "BT" I bought second, I'm still not sure what it really is.  It's small like a BT but not brown at all, more light violet/blue varigated and a different shape than my neighbor's BT which I think really is a BT.  But it's very good.  As they say: A fig by any other name . . .

I think a lot of the more mainstream commercial trade figs can be pretty mixed up.  The most accurate label would probably be "Mystery Fig."

If you are looking for a special variety though, and want to be sure you are getting that variety, Jon, Herman, and Bass have some great figs and you can be certain that they are true to type.

Whatever it turns out to be, I hope it's a very good one for you.

Best wishes to all. 

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Strawberry Figs? Replies: 8
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,222
 
Thanks Dennis.  That is a great story, and a great idea.  Adding a few strawberries to the fig jam sounds pretty good too.

I would love to see pictures of this tree also.

I don't even have a camara.  I grew up in Amish country, and although we are not Amish, we might as well be concerning technology.  But I am going to have to get one so I can start to share pictures of our figs and farm.

Best wishes to all.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Strawberry Figs? Replies: 8
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,222
 
Thank you ItalianGirl.  Wise advice indeed.

We have been trying to move our children away from the factory produced food in general, and to maximize home grown organic fruits and vegetables. 

And I am planting enough figs to feed all the kids in the area and then some.  So I hope that they will enjoy them, and then maybe grow up with good memories of eating figs from our farm.

And I think you are right about taste being a subjective experience, not just different preferences, but it actually tasting different to different people.

I find beef most unpleasant, for example, and milk is not good either, so surely others are tasting something different than I am.  But milk in cheesecake, ice cream, or aged cheeses (i.e., Parmigiano Reggiano) is good.

So I will try to get the kids to try them all and see if they have a favorite.

I have also found that when the kids participate with planting and picking they are more likely to eat the produce.

Thank you, and very best wishes my friend.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Strawberry Figs? Replies: 8
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,222
 
Thanks Jon.

It's a nice name, and our Raspberry Latte is a strong grower.

I still think calling it "Strawberry" or "Raspberry" is going to be helpful in encouraging kids to try the figs. 

Most kids recognize strawberry and raspberry as either berries or flavors they like, so hopefully this will encourage kids to try figs and enjoy these healthy fruits.

Anybody know a variety of fig that kids especially like?

What variety is the best tasting overall for kids and adults?

Subject: Strawberry Figs? Replies: 8
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,222
 
Several fig varieties have "strawberry" in their name, but do any varieties actually taste like strawberries, or does this just refer to the color more than the flavor?

Does the "Raspberry Latte" taste like raspberry or is that also more a description of the color?

Hope everyone is well and that you are having a good growing season.

Best wishes to all.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Super Hot Weather...having to repot Replies: 20
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,276
 
Hi Mike.  We went through about 10 years of drought here until the regular rains returned.  And although we complain about the humidity now we are very thankful to have the rain.  Watering can keep plants alive but they really seem to thrive with real rain.

I remember well though the frustration of seeing rain in the distance only, or driving home through rain just to see it bone dry when you got close to home. 

This went on for about 10 years in one of the longest droughts this area has ever seen.  So eventually the frustration of being emotionally involved in whether or not it would rain just got to be too much, and I finally just had to resolve myself to this: The drought will end when it starts raining again, and that's not up to me.  The only thing that is up to me is how much I suffer in the meantime.  It's going to rain when it rains, and not a minute sooner.

Hope you do get some good regular rain soon though.

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Lisa breba Replies: 2
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 604
 
Great pictures Jon.  Thanks for sharing these.

And highs in the 60s sound great.  Here in the Southeast it's looking like a long hot summer (till hell freezes over again this fall!).  ;-)

Actually it's not that bad, just a little hotter and significantly more humid than it's been in a while.  But on the whole it looks like a great growing season, and we are all very grateful for the regular rain again.

Hope you are having a great growing season as well.

Best wishes to all.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Celeste figs not ripening Replies: 15
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 3,942
 
Hi Bill.  What do you think of your Alma?

I got three cuttings (from Jon), they took off right away, and all three are growing like weeds.

I've never had an Alma though (tree or fruit) and I was just curious what you thought about the tree and fruit.

Hope you have a great growing season.

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Fig Mosaic and Thermotherapy Replies: 24
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 2,555
 
Thank you Martin.

Hope your Ischia makes a rebound this season and then really takes off for you.

We struggle with "Fire Blight" here with apples and pears.  It looks terrible (like all the new growth has been burned brown) and can slow down growth. but we have never lost a tree to fire blight so far.

Blueberries here look like a record crop, as does most everything else.  We started picking the first blueberries this week.  And so far the fake (plastic) Red Tail Hawk seems to be keeping the birds away (or at least the less perceptive ones!).

Hope all is well with you.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Fig Mosaic and Thermotherapy Replies: 24
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 2,555
 
Thanks Martin.

My older plants didn't seem to have this, at least not visibly.  FMV is obvious on three new plants, and living with that is the only realistic option.

I do have a couple questions though:

Will FMV appear on all the fig trees or just a few?

Other than cosmetic, is there any real harm?

The infected plants seem to be growing strong and setting figs.

Hope all is well with you.

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: 1-2 days from a fresh fig Replies: 9
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,178
 
You're right Bill.  It does look like pictures from the 1970's!  ;-)

And any chance those of you further down South could keep this heat and humidity further down south?  It is hotter than 10 yards of hell out there, but the worst part is the humidity.

Thanks for sharing the pictures.

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b 

Subject: Fig Mosaic and Thermotherapy Replies: 24
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 2,555
 
Thank you Jon.

We live in an imperfect world, and as the Bhudda said, our suffering comes not from this reality as much as from our clinging and avoidance.

In this case, clinging to an ideal of purity and perfection that is unattainable and avoiding the reality that FMV is an unavoidable part of our world.

The remedy is acceptance, and then we can relax and enjoy the figs.

Best wishes to all.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Pruning breba only types Replies: 8
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 783
 
Sorry to hear about the storm jrice, but hope everything is recovering.

And as always, thank you so much for the very helpful information Jon.

Best wishes to all.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Fig tree from the jersey shore Replies: 13
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,459
 
Great picture!  Thanks for sharing this.

Hopefully one of the more experienced members can help you identify this fig.

Hope you have a great growing season there in New Jersey.

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Varieties that Root Well Replies: 20
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,304
 
Hi Yuri.  The natural drainage of being in ground, good air circulation, sunlight, and the presence of a wide spectrum of natural bacteria, etc., in soil may help with avoiding some of the fungal problems.  But this is just a guess.

I can, however, conclusively confirm that it is easy!  ;-)

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: figs in Pennsylvania Replies: 24
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 4,881
 
That is amazing Bass.  Thank you for sharing these great pictures.

We don't get anywhere near that cold here.

Our problem here in the Piedmont is unstable Spring weather, specifically late freezes.  The figs will over-winter fine, then it will warm up, figs will leaf out, and then BOOM we get a late hard freeze.  The figs take the cold (down into the teens occassionally) just fine when they are dormant, but are very vulnerable when they break dormancy.

Thanks Bass.

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Varieties that Root Well Replies: 20
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,304
 
Hi Yuri.  I had success with 2 out of 3 cuttings on the Desert King.  But my method was pretty basic (see above).  Others may have greater success with more sophisticated methods.

Hope they do well for you.

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Varieties that Root Well Replies: 20
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,304
 
Hi Fred.  I didn't get them all at once, but pretty much early April, which is generally just past the last freeze date here in Zone 7b.

In generally though, the ones planted a little later (and in warmer conditions) sprouted much quicker and better.

I'm still adding a few here and there, and there is still plenty of time before the late October first freeze here.

Hope you have a great growing season Fred.

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Varieties that Root Well Replies: 20
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,304
 
My gardening style is as simple and as natural as possible (i.e. lazy).  So what I wanted to do was simulate the conditions a sprouting fig would find in nature.

Since they grow under a mother fig, I dug a 4 x 8 foot spot on the south side (for mid-day shade) of my largest fig (an Italian Honey; it's a weed; so I couldn't kill it if I were trying), put about 4 inches of good quality garden soil on top, and put the cuttings in the ground.

I also gave all the cuttings a brief soak in some home-made rooting tea I made from the soft wood tips of willow branches (which may be totally unnecessary; but it was free so I tried it), and covered the whole area with a quick made chicken wire box to keep the dogs and armidillos from digging up the cuttings.  And watered lightly when the dirt looked dry.

Nothing fancy, but I had about a 70% success rate overall.  100% with some, including these: The Almas, Raspberry Lattes, Hardy Chicagos, Celestes, and Golden Celestes all leafed out well and are still going strong, up to about a foot tall now (I'm assuming they have roots because of the length of time they have been growing and vigor of growth; but since they are in ground you can't see of course).  The Marsailles Blacks did well too, but more like about 70%.  And the only one that was a loss was the Florea.  They were good strong looking cuttings so who knows what went wrong.  But with a second set there is now one leafing out and two that still look possible.  Overall it was a big success I thought, and pretty low stress and low maintenance.

The Almas and the Raspberry Lattes were the strongest, fastest rooters, but once the Marsailles Blacks leafed out they have also been very strong growers and are now the biggest and strongest of the varieties I am rooting.

Most important, it was a lot of fun watching them every day to see what was happening.

And remember that gardening isn't like parachuting.  If something goes wrong, you just try again.

Best wishes to all.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: figs in Pennsylvania Replies: 24
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 4,881
 
Hi Bass.  That is pretty amazing.  The challenge is part of the fun though.  When people say you can't grow that here, some of us just have to try it seems.  Sometimes the nay-sayers are right, often they are not.

Thanks for sharing my friend.

Hope you are having a great growing season.

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: New member from a bit far away Replies: 41
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 3,577
 
Welcome Yuri!

I have many friends from Ukraine.  Thank you for sharing, and I hope we will continue to hear about your progress.

Very best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: New Member Replies: 21
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,444
 
Wow!  That is a very impressive collection!  Thanks for sharing Jason.

How is your Raspberry Latte doing in this climate?  Do you think it is hardy enough to over winter outside here in Georgia?  I grow all my figs in ground here in the orchard, but I'm wondering whether I need to grow the Raspberry Latte in a pot.

Hope you have a great growing season Jason.

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: My Violet De Bordeaux Replies: 9
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,645
 
Thank you Martin.  I always enjoy reading your posts, and it is a great pleasure to be able to share with other gardeners.  To me gardening is a wonderful, almost magical experience: You plant that stick, seed, etc., and with some care in time it turns into something truly wonderful.

And this forum is so positive, with good people sharing pictures of their gardens, helping others.  In a world with too many troubles it seems, this is a great place to visit.

I look forward to reading your future posts as well my friend.

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Inducing brebas Replies: 9
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,013
 
Hi Jon.  We went through 10 hard years of drought here and the breba crops were light.  The drought ended with a vengence last year and we got heavy rains all winter, and by far the heaviest breba crops ever (all trees are in ground).  Most of them ended up dropping unfortunately, but the original quantity of brebas was very, very heavy.  And the main crops that have set for this year are very heavy and rapidly moving toward maturity.

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Fig Hedge Replies: 54
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 5,500
 

P.S. To water our fruit hedges, I leave a soaker hose running down the length of the hedge and just connect and water as needed.  It's efficient for both labor and water.


Subject: My Violet De Bordeaux Replies: 9
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,645
 
These two issue could be related Martin: Maybe you are eating too many sugary figs!  ;-)

Despite the challenges, I hope the dental process goes as well as it can for you, and that you have a great growing season.

With the drought over our figs are growing like weeds.

Very best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Fig Hedge Replies: 54
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 5,500
 
Sounds like a great plan Ken.  One of the great things about a forum like this is that someone can take a general idea and make an even better mouse trap for their situation.  That would be a pretty efficient and impressive set up I would think.

I have about an 8 foot test run hedge going this year, and I am also using it to put in random cuttings in the open areas between planted figs for new trees, so while the permanent trees are growing it is also doubling as a new tree nursury as well.

And I miss my $200.  But I don't miss the snake.  I'm pretty sure the guy who helped us out liked the snake about as well as the $200.  He seemed very happy to have it and relocate it to his property (a safe 30 miles away).  It was certainly an impressive critter by local standards, so I hope they are very happy together.

Stay well my friend.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: The first figs this year from turkey june1 Replies: 14
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 958
 
Those look fantastic!

Thank you for sharing my friend.

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Fig Hedge Replies: 54
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 5,500
 
P.S. Ken: I was thinking about you this weekend, when we had a snake drama.  I hadn't seen a snake at our house in over 10 years, then a rat snake showed up and got under the house through a crack near the foundation vent.  Nothing $200 couldn't fix though, and as a snake-a-phobe, it was worth every penny to bring in a pro.  And he had a heck of a time getting him out.  Those are constricters and he was wrapped in there good.  But fortunately he was safely removed unharmed and relocated far, far away.

Let's hope it's a another 10 years or more before we see another one.  And we are getting a contractor to assure that there are no more cracks or openings that they could use to get in, and making sure there are no rats, mice, etc., to attract them.

So enough about the snakes already!  ;-)

I'm creeping myself out just thinking about it.

Best wishes.

John

Subject: Fig Hedge Replies: 54
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 5,500
 
Hi Ken.  I have all winter to think about.  I will be digging the bed this winter (the best time for any heavy work in the South), and setting out the fig trees in the early Spring.  But I am thinking about 3-4 feet apart.  And then keep the hedge pruned to about 4-5 feet wide and 5-6 feet tall.  That's pretty much what we have done with the Blueberry and Cherry hedges.

It's tight spacing but that also means weeds between generally get shaded out.

Hopefully it will work out nicely, like the other fruit hedges, but even if it doesn't you just replant and try again. 

Gardening isn't like parachuting.  Even if you have a disaster, you still get to try again.

Hope all is well with you.

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Fig Hedge Replies: 54
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 5,500
 
Hi everyone.  For years I have grown blueberries, raspberries, and bush cherries in a hedge with great success.

Our soil here is relatively poor in many areas (mostly rock hard red clay) so what I do is double-dig a long trench about 4 feet wide, work in as much peat moss, compost, and other organic matter as I can get, and then plant the bushes so that they will form a hedge at maturity.

The advantages include efficient use of land area, maximum fruit production in that area, and ease of mowing, weeding, and picking (you just go up and down each side of the hedge and you're done).  The blueberry, raspberry, and cherry hedges are rows inside the orchard, but the fig hedge will be a perimeter hedge (that's all that's left for planting in the orchard).

Disadvantages include that figs are not evergreen, but in the location this really isn't an issue.

The biggest advantage is that this gives us a LOT of room for new figs.

So I'm already working on my wish list for next season.

Hope everyone is well and best wishes to all.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Please tell me which figs smell Replies: 39
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 5,386
 
Hope you have a great season this year Ottawan.

Best wishes.

John

Subject: My Violet De Bordeaux Replies: 9
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,645
 
Great pictures Martin, thank you.

Except for some older in ground figs (Italian Honey; Brown Turkey; Chicago Hardy; and LSU Purple & Gold) I'm relatively new to growing figs.  Your pictures do confirm that my Texas Blue Giant and Violette de Bordeaux both have this virus as well.  I'm not concerned though.  I have been an organic gardener for decades, so our operating policy is if they live that's great, if not plant something else.

And I feel your pain brother, I am going to the dentist Monday.  At least you will be done today!  ;-)

Best wishes.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Please tell me which figs smell Replies: 39
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 5,386
 
Hi Ottawan.  I'm sure you're right: 1) All our figs are in ground outside; and 2) My sense of smell is very limited.

Turns out that is good news though, as I think all our figs are most pleasant.

If you want to smell nastry trees though: 1) Bradford Pears when they are blooming; or 2) the rotting fruit from a Ginkgo tree.

Honestly, there's nothing I don't like about figs, which is why they are so much fun to grow.

I especially enjoy the heirloom plants.  Because the cuttings are basically clones, you can pass on the same plant for generations building a rich history.  You can enjoy the exact same figs that our ancesters enjoyed in Europe and the Middle East.

Best wishes to all.

John
Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Newbie with some questions Replies: 12
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 820
 
That is my understanding also.  I only used the softwood tips of the willow branches.  It worked well for me, it was free, and all natural (not toxic like the commercial rooting hormones).

But it also may be unnecessary.  I really don't know.

Best wishes.

John
Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Just had to share Replies: 13
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,097
 
Hi Ottawan.  Hope your Excel does just as well.

It's either a gigantic fig or a very small hand!  ;-)

It's magnificent Mario!

We have an Excel also, but it's just in it's second year and may have some fruit but nothing like this I am sure.

Best wishes to all.

John
Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Newbie with some questions Replies: 12
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 820
 
Hi Pearlheart.  I saw the same video, I was new to growing from cuttings, and tried using the willow cuttings to stimulate root growth.  I planted over 100 cuttings of different varieties: 1) Giving them a soak in the willow growth hormone extract; 2) Plant them straight in ground in high quality potting soil (on top of well dug ground).  Overall I had about 70% success and they look great.  I had 100% success with some varieties, and only 0% success with one variety, although the second planting of that variety still has one growing and maybe others will pull through as well.

So this method has worked very well for me this year.  The willow cuttings were free from a neighbor, and it's far better and safer than the toxic growth hormones they sell at garden stores.

Bottom line: It's like chicken soup: Even if it doesn't help it couldn't hurt.  It's just water and willow cuttings.  But it may not be necessary, who knows.  It could be that if I just put them in the ground they would have done as well.  But it wasn't hard to do, and it gave me a sense of having done the best I could if nothing else.  And you can't argue with success.

Hope you have great success.  An heirloom plant like that is very special.

Best wishes my friend.

John
Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Just had to share Replies: 13
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,097
 
Wow!  Those are incredible!  I have never seen a fig that large.

Thank you for sharing my friend.

Best wishes to all.

John
Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: June 01 2010Fig Embryos forming DATA! Replies: 8
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,561
 
Thank you for the update and information Herman.

Your figs looks great, very healthy.

And I think you are right about this being a good fig season this year.  Ours look better than ever, they are growing very rapidly and loaded with figs.  Almost all of the brebas dropped early here, but the main crop set quickly and is rapidly moving toward maturity here in Zone 7b.  I will let everyone know when we have the first ripe figs, but I don't think it will be long.

Thanks Herman.  Good health and good gardening to you my friend.

Best wishes to all.

John
Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: New Member Replies: 21
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,444
 
p.s. Forgot the Excel and maybe one or two others, but you get the idea.  It's a start on a nice collection.

Best wishes.

John

Subject: New Member Replies: 21
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,444
 
Thank you very much Jason.

Hope you are having a great season.  Everything looks good here, and very happy to see the long drought ended.

Do you grow all of your figs in ground?  Do you use any protection for overwintering?

We generally try to keep things as simple and low maintenance as possible, and grow everything in ground and open.  And although the first few years the figs tend to freeze back (we are a little colder than you are here) they always come back from the roots at worst, after that they seem to do fine, establishing a hardwood base to overwinter and spring back from after a few years.

Here are some of the varieties I'm growing (please forgive my spelling; I'm going from memory):

Well stablished:

Hardy Chicago
Italian Honey
LSU Purple and Gold
Brown Turkey


Newer but bearing fruit for the first year:

LSU Purple
Texas Blue Giant
Viollet de Bordeux
Celeste

New cuttings being rooted:

Adriana
Guillbeau
Golden Celeste
Marsailles VS Black
Vinny's Old Brooklyn
Florea
Raspberry Latte
Strawberry Verte
Herman's Celeste
Alma
Desert King

I started the cuttings all in ground.  With rooting, so far I have had 100% success with many of them, about 70% overall, and at least one of all seems to be rooting (the Florea didn't do well at first; they were great cuttings so who knows; but there is still one going and maybe another couple will bounce back). 

Happy growing my fellow Georgian.

Best wishes.

John
Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Lindhurst White! Replies: 5
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,390
 
Hi Herman.  I greatly appreciate your sharing your research, and greatly respect your knowledge and experience.  I am trying to find a few outstanding cold hardy varieties for my mother (Zone 5).  She always wanted to grow figs but didn't think it possible.  She was very happy to learn that it is.  I am starting a few of the most cold hardy figs for her here (Zone 7), and I will pot them up and take them to her when they are ready so they can be moved inside (her garage in Zone 5) as the safe figs.  But if we have an extra plant to try she has a very nice south facing protected brick wall area that would be perfect to really test out some cold hardy figs.  With some protective wrapping some very cold hardy varieties (such as Chicago Hardy; she lives near Chicago) might be just fine there in ground.

I'm always very interested in hearing about your findings with the fig varieties you are testing.  Thanks.

Hope you are having a good season Herman, and very best wishes.

John
Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Lindhurst White! Replies: 5
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,390
 
Thank you for sharing this good news Herman.  It solds like a great variety to try.  If you might happen to have any cuttings to sell in the future please let me know.  I would love to try these.

Hope all is well with you.

Best wishes.

John
Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Please tell me which figs smell Replies: 39
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 5,386
 
Hi Vivian.

We have Bobcats here, and I woudn't put anything past them!  ;-)

I really don't smell anything other than an earthy, spicy, woodsy scent from our figs, all of which is very pleasant.  If it's genetic I am very happy not to have the gene that let's me smell the unpleasant scent some are smelling.  It's just not there as far as  I can tell.  I generally find milk and beef most unpleasant though, and clearly most everyone else is tasting something different than I am. 

Hope you are having a great growing season.

Best wishes.

John
Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

 

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