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Subject: Please tell me which figs smell Replies: 39
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 5,386
 
I'm definately with Ken, Ras, and Rafed on this one: Our figs smell great.

Maybe you guys have a tomcat peeing on your figs!  ;-)

Just kidding.  Smell, taste, etc., are very subjective things, but I definately think that figs smell very earthy, spicy, and refreshing.  Otherwise, I wouldn't be planting so many in our orchard.  Tomcat urine would not be something I would want to smell everyday in the orchard.

Our figs are really coming along nicely here in North Georgia.  Lots of little figs that are sizing up quickly.  It looks like the best year yet.

Hope everyone else has a good season as well.

Very best wishes to all.

John
Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b



Subject: Snake tale Replies: 19
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,154
 
Never seen a critter like that here thank goodness.

(and really, really hope I never do).

Best wishes.

John
Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Super Wet Soil Issues Replies: 20
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,273
 
I would generally defer to my more experienced colleagues, but given that this appears to be a fig emergency and I'm the first responder:

Is there adequate drainage in the pot? If possible repot it in a bigger pot, and get it out in the sun a.s.a.p.

Subject: If you could only have 5 varieties of figs... Replies: 5
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,212
 
I'm just getting started with varieties other than what was available locally, so I'm hoping others will respond, and I'm taking notes.

Thanks Ottawan.  I have the others now but I will add the Sal and Natalina.

I have a Brown Turkey, LSU, and Italian Honey fig that have been in ground for years now and are solid producers, and I have over 20 other varieties started, but I am putting together the wish list for next year and hope others will make good suggestions.

Good question Ireilly.  Thanks.

John
Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b


Subject: Source for cuttings? Replies: 10
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,087
 
I ordered mine, mostly from Jon at Encanto Farms (sold through e-bay) and from Hermansur (also through e-bay).  All of these cuttings were outstanding quality, top varieties, and they are doing great.  These guys are experts and know what they are doing.  They will send you the right varieties at the right time of year.

I also got a few others here and there.  Local varieties were pretty limited though, so I highly recommend the above as outstanding sources.  They are real experts and they will send you exactly what you think you are getting.  Otherwise, the fig you may be getting is whatever Grandma thought it was.  It still may be a good fig, but for a select variety go to a reliable source.

Best wishes.

John
Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: update on figs planted last year Replies: 9
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,064
 
Thanks for the information Aaron.  We have both of these figs and hope to get a few figs this year.  The Nanking Bush Cherries have been very good for us, because we can't seem to grow a regular cherry tree in our climate.  They are smaller (the bushes only get about 6 feet tall) and the fruit is smaller, but the taste is every bit as good and they grow like weeds.  You will get fruit quick too.  Maybe a little bit even the first year, but the second year for sure.  Premier Blueberries have done really well for us too.

Hope you have a great season.

Best wishes.

John
Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: How long from cutting to figs? Replies: 4
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 842
 
In our climate (zone 7b) we have gotten fruit the second year, but not much and not the best.  The quality and quantity of fruit greatly increases as the tree matures, but by year three you will probably get some decent fruit I would think.

If you are protecting the plants over winter you may speed the process some, but for us the benefit is not worth the cost.  We grow all our trees in ground and they do fine after the first few years.  They almost always freeze back to the ground the first year or two, but don't panic.  They also almost always come back from the roots stronger and larger each year until there is a good strong root system and a hardwood base to grow from.

We grow all organic, so I would suggest that one of the best things you could do is to assure that your figs have good healthy soil with lots of organic matter and that they are mulched well.  We are trying lots of new varieties (and will have to wait and see what happens with these) but with our older figs, it tooks some patience the first few years, but once they settled into the location and climate they have been strong and produced well almost every year.  The worst thing that happens is some years it gets warm and the figs leaf out, and then we get a late hard freeze which can severly damage the figs, but they survive that too.

Bottom line: With some good common sense care, and a good location with lots of sun and good soil, you can't go wrong.  In a few years you will have some outstanding figs and lots of fun in the process.

Best wishes.

John
Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: update on figs planted last year Replies: 9
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,064
 
p.s.  The Nanking Cherries do have one peculiarity.  The turn red and then fully ripen a week or two later.  Some people taste the red but still unripe fruit and don't like them.  But they aren't really ripe till a week or two after turning red.  The get larger and the juice and sugar increase greatly when fully ripe and taste just like a good pie cherry at that point.  But they are smaller, about 1/2 to 2/3 size, but every branch is covered and easy to pick.  Just gently run your hand down the branch with a buckety underneath.

We got the Nanking Cherries from Raintree Nursery.

Subject: update on figs planted last year Replies: 9
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,064
 
Thanks for the info on the Texas Blue Giant Aaron.

Our figs generally died back completely to the ground the first year, and all the new growth was from the roots.  But after a few years they now have a solid hardwood base that overwinters just fine and the standing overwintering part is about 4-6 feet depending on the variety, pruning, etc.

If you're planting a small orchard, I would also highly recommend Nanking Cherries.  Cherry trees were easy to grow up North around the Lakes, but we had repeated failure with cherry trees in this climate (Zone 7b).  So we tried Bush Cherries, specifically Nanking Cherries, and we have way more than we can use.  They taste just like pie cherries, and you can eat them fresh, make great cherry sauce, juice, preserves, etc.  They are smaller than regular cherries though, so pitting them is more work than it's worth.  So we just cook them and run them through a colander to separate out the pits and make pies that taste like great cherry pies but are more like the texture of a lemon pie, smooth with no fruit pieces.  They grow great here though, totally pest and disease free, so if you like cherries this is good choice for this climate.  If you lived closer I'd say come pick some.  They have been getting ripe for about 2 weeks now (they are very early fruiting and provide fruit a decent crop the 2nd year after planting) and I have given up on keeping up with them.  That's a good problem to have though.  Too much fruit.

Best wishes.

John
Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: update on figs planted last year Replies: 9
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,064
 

p.s.  We don't cover anything and all are in ground.  We try to locate them in favorable locations (on the south side of a hill; building; micro-climate protected area; etc., but otherwise they are on their own, and so far they are generally doing very well without any covering after the first year acclimation process.


Subject: update on figs planted last year Replies: 9
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,064
 
Hi Aaron.  We are in Zone 7b here in North Georgia, so we probably have a similar climate.  I'm trying lots of new figs, which are still an unknown of course, but with the older now well established figs I noticed a clear pattern: They would die back to the ground the first year, but every year come back a little stronger till they acclimated with a strong root system and a hardwood base to come back from quickly and strongly each year.  They looked dead after the first winter generally, but in time nearly all of them came back stronger each year.  So be patient and in a few years you should have some strong plants.

Our general approach is organic, all natural, and as low maintenance as possible, and on the whole we have had great success.  But if a plant or tree proves to be too weak for the climate, we just replace it with a stronger one better suited to the climate, which on the whole is very mild (compared to the Great Lakes where I'm originally from).

I'm especially interested in how your Texas Giant is doing in Zone 7/Southeast.  We just planted one of these this year.

For the most part, to grow a fig here, all you have to do is plant it and get out of the way.  Our figs are looking great this year.  Hope you have a good season too.

Best wishes.

John
Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Calabrese fig breba Replies: 13
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 2,965
 
Thanks for sharing this great picture.

I have some brebas on the Italian Honey and Hardy Chicago here in Zone 7b, but for Zone 6 these are really making some good progress.

Hope you have great season this year.

Best wishes.

John
Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Birds and Unripe Figs Replies: 17
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 5,789
 
You may very well be right my friend, but I will fight them to the last fig!

;-)

Best wishes.

John
Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Air-Layering Replies: 70
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 7,717
 
Very interesting and very helpful.  I am looking forward to trying this.

Thank you for posting this useful example.

Best wishes.

John
Georgia Piedmost
Zone 7b

Subject: Birds and Unripe Figs Replies: 17
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 5,789
 
To start my fig scions I built a 4x8 covered cage made of black pvc covered chicken wire on a wire frame and then secured it all around firmly to the ground by pounding in long wire hooks.

I built it to keep armidillos from digging in the bed and ruining the rooting figs.

It has worked great in keeping out everything, except one morning there was a young about half grown Mocking Bird INSIDE the cage.  I honestly have no idea how he got in there, but I let him out and then tried to stop thinking about how he could have gotten in there.  They are magicians apparently.

So my next plan is to defeat the Mocking Bird mauraders is to use over-whelming numbers: I am planting about 70 fig trees in the orchard, so either I'm still going to have a lot of figs despite the local Mockingbirds, or the Mockingbirds are going to have to call in some serious reinforcements!  ;-) 

Subject: Birds and Unripe Figs Replies: 17
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 5,789
 
Is it possible that the trees just dropped the brebas?

I have never had anything eat an unripe fig, and our birds generally prefer the darker colored figs, mostly leaving the green/yellow varieties alone in favor of the darker ripe figs.

Do what you can, but as I so often tell myself, there's always next year.

Best wishes to all.

John
Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Raspberry Latte Climate Replies: 41
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 3,980
 
Thank you very much.  I greatly appreciate your sharing this helpful information.

We can't wait to try the RL figs, and flying those little guys in from out of state would have been pretty expensive!  ;-)

I greatly appreciate all the information, the terrific fig scions, and the wonderful forum here.

Best wishes to all.

Subject: Raspberry Latte Climate Replies: 41
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 3,980
 
RL is definately a winner as a rooter, and otherwise shows great promise, but if we need that wasp, I'm guessing they are going to have a heck of a time finding my yard from where they are now!  ;-)

Best wishes Gorgi

John
Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Raspberry Latte Climate Replies: 41
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 3,980
 
Thank you Martin and Jon.

I will keep you posted on the progress here in the North Georgia Piemont.

All three of the RL scions look great and seem to be really digging in for a solid start.

We get down to the teens here in the winter though, so I will definately try a pot for one RL, but maybe be bold and test another one in ground in a protected area with covering, and the third just in ground.

RL could prove to be a lot tougher than currently known, and even if not, there's still the one in the pot in the garage!  ;-)

Thank you friends.

Best wishes for good health and a great growing season.

John
Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Raspberry Latte Climate Replies: 41
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 3,980
 
I am breathing a big sigh of relief!

They look so good, it would be heartbreaking to lose them now.

But I have been an organic gardener and orchardist for over 20 years now, so I know that nothing is ever certain, and it's always do your best and take your chances.

We are relatively new to figs though, but really enjoying this new and rewarding hobby.

I greatly appreciate the advice and quick reply my friend, and hope you will have a great season and continued success.

Best wishes.

John
Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Raspberry Latte Climate Replies: 41
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 3,980
 
Thank you for the quick reply my friend.

This is very helpful.  I am rooting these in good quality potting soil outside and so far I am getting very good results.  But since I can't see the roots, I was getting nervous even though the tops look great.

Your comments were very helpful and greatly appreciated.

Hope you have great success and a great season this year.

Best wishes.

John
Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: Raspberry Latte Climate Replies: 41
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 3,980
 
Does anybody know how cold hardy a Raspberry Latte Fig is?  Sorry to bother everybody with this but I couldn't find information on this and hoped someone here might know.

We are in zone 7b so would the Raspberry Latte survive in ground like our other figs or should we try a pot?

We got three scions from Encanto Farms and all three are growing like weeds already. 

Is this vigorous leaf growth a decent indicator of root growth too?  They have been leafed out for a good month now and are going strong.

Thanks friends, and best wishes to all.

Subject: Main Crop Emerging Replies: 6
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 759
 
Thanks for sharing these pictures.

Best wishes.

John
Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b

Subject: New Member Replies: 21
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,444
 
Hi Ken.  To quote Canjun Gourmet and Chef Justin Wilson: "The best kind of wine to drink is the kind you like."

I'm no expert either, but I would think this is good advice for figs too.

So enjoy those BT figs as much as you can, we certainly do, and if you find some you like even better then life just keeps getting better and better.

My neighbor and I both have "Brown Turkeys" and they aren't exactly the same.  Similar, but noticeably different.

But in my limited experience so far, there's no bad fig.

Thanks for the comments everyone.  What a great group of people here.

Best wishes for continued health and happiness to all.

John
North Georgia
Zone 7b

Subject: New Member Replies: 21
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,444
 
Hi Rafed.  You are so right my friend!

I'm already making a list of figs I can't live without for next year!  ;-)

Best wishes to all.

John
North Georgia
Zone 7b

Subject: New Member Replies: 21
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,444
 
Hi Scott.  Except for the last 10 years of drought (which seems to be over) and the unsteady Spring temperatures that can cause leafing out before the last hard freeze, North Georgia seems to be pretty good fig country, maybe similar to the Piedmont in Northern Italy.

And Ken I forgot to mention the LSU figs, an LSU Purple and an LSU Purple and Gold.  Brown Turkeys don't get much respect it seems, but at least to my taste they are quite good, easy to grow, and very productive.

And Fred I am growing everything in ground here in Zone 7b.  The first year or two they may freeze back, but so far everything always bounces back from the roots, and after a few years they seem to aclimate and get a more solid hard wood trunk as an annual growing base.

I am still learning a lot, and making some mistakes, but having great fun.

I learn alot from everyone's posts here and really enjoy the pictures.

Best wishes to all.

John
North Georgia
Zone 7b

Subject: New Member Replies: 21
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,444
 
Hi Ken.

I started with what was available locally a few years ago (Brown Turkey; Celeste; Italian Honey; Chicago Hardy) and I am now also growing:

Marseilles Black VS
Florea
White King
Danny's Delight
Raspberry Latte
Alma
Strawberry Verte
Violet De Bordeaux
Texas Blue Giant
Excel
Gold Celeste
And a few others I don't really know for sure quite honestly (but we will see soon)

I received some really excellent cutting from Herman2 and Encanto Farms, and collected other unusual varieties here and there.

Bottom line: We are having great fun, and should have some great figs soon.

Hope you are as well, and I look forward to reading about your progress.

Thank you friend.

Best wishes.

John


Subject: New Member Replies: 21
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 1,444
 
Hi everyone.  I am a new member in the Georgia Piedmont region (Northeast Georgia) zone 7b.  I have no formal training or expertise related to figs (I am a former lawyer; current professor), just a relatively new (and extreme!)interest in growing figs.  I have been an organic gardner for over 20 years, and I am finding figs among the most fun and rewarding orchard crops.

I have greatly enjoyed reading your posts, and especially seeing your pictures, and I will be happy to share as well when I have something note worthy to post.

My great thanks to everyone responsible for setting up and maintaining this most informative website, and to everyone for your most interesting, helpful, and enjoyable posts.

Subject: Thought I Share Few Pictures Replies: 1
Posted By: GeorgiaFig Views: 571
 
Thank you Martin.  I did enjoy these pictures.  Good examples and good results it appears.  Best wishes and best of health to you as well.

John
Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7

 

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