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Subject: Long fruit mulberry and Taiwan fruit mulberry Replies: 14
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 2,901
 
Probably not, but Mulberry seems to have a pretty open lifestyle when it comes to sex. Here is a quote from CRFG "Mulberry trees are either dioecious or monoecious, and sometimes will change from one sex to another. The flowers are held on short, green, pendulous, nondescript catkins that appear in the axils of the current season's growth and on spurs on older wood. They are wind pollinated and some cultivars will set fruit without any pollination Cross-pollination is not necessary. In California mulberries set fruit without pollination." And if you are not sure if male or female look in the crotch of the tree. That's not mine, but I remember reading it somewhere.

Subject: Long fruit mulberry and Taiwan fruit mulberry Replies: 14
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 2,901
 
Chapman,

Most Morus Rubra ( our only mulberry native to U.S.) are normally pretty tasty so don't sell them short. They will be nothing the size of the photos here. Morus Alba is naturalized here, but not native, and is more variable, from very bland to very good. You can't always trust the labels either at my local Pikes nursery they had  plant labeled as "Native Mulberry" and the tag also stated Morus Nigra. If I knew for sure it was Nigra I might have went for it, but still dormant and not for sure I could ID even if it was leafed I passed. I don't believe "Native Mulberry" is a cultivar of Nigra, and Nigra  isn't native to U.S. A seedling may turn out male however, as in no fruit:(

Subject: OT: PIX: IL Everbearing Mulberry rooted. Replies: 22
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,068
 
Dave,
I have a little Aussie , my Daughter used to run agility with him, but she's away at college now and  he has no interest in earning his keep A little rat terrier or such would keep them looking over their shoulder, but my wife swears no more dogs. I think  she said no more figs, but how would she even know:} The dog might not be that easy  to keep low on. Maybe when we get settled in the new place, which just took a big step forward today as we got a contract on our house, just hope all runs clear to close, because we just put in a contract to buy the adjoining 9 acres to our new place, had to act, as it was going to be gone, but hey I just doubled the farm maybe I need another dog.

Subject: OT: PIX: IL Everbearing Mulberry rooted. Replies: 22
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,068
 
So as not to sway to far OT of a OT thread there is Mulberry cuttings in there as well, and some pomegranates. Shangri La and Middleton Mulberry rooted  the only 2 I was successful rooting last year of several cultivars. Back to my corral of roll of hardware cloth and chicken wire over the top, the youngters should feel right at home as they spent last summer in the same setup, but I need to pick up a 4 foot wide roll . I have a body count of three since the crime, but I think the supply of mercenary tree rats that want to become a martyr  from surrounding woods might be limitless, so I don't know if I will ever get ahead, but I have stepped up my defense.

Attached Images
jpeg fig_corral.JPG (138.84 KB, 36 views)


Subject: OT: PIX: IL Everbearing Mulberry rooted. Replies: 22
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,068
 

I have been one saying that certain Mulberry cultivars I have had a hard time rooting while others I have had success with. I don’t know why I didn’t apply the methods we have learned for figs prior. The prior 2 years I probably have tried over 100 cuttings of Illinois Everbearing and probably 20 Pakistan with zero success.  I have gotten tops to stay green for a couple months, but eventually decline and autopsy revealing no roots. I was scoring them and dip-n-grow in prior years but not bagging them up in Sphagnum and controlling temp. This year like others I  decided to treat them just like I do figs and potted up some more today. On the left is Pakistan on the right I.E. I have several other cultivars in sphagnum just started up as well, so hopefully they do as well. The do take longer than figs to show roots. I sent cuttings to a few folks hope they are faster learners then I was.

And just vent, does anyone want to trade a RDB. I swear I am cursed for that cultivar 2 years ago I failed to root it. Last year I had acquired from 2 sources. One came as green moldy cutting that never took, the second was a single cutting I succeeded with but more on that in a moment. This year I won one of the Chinese new year and received nice cuttings but they just declined on me, one of only the couple cultivars I failed with this year. Yesterday I went out to check last year’s babies that I just moved outside. I paniced seeing the squirrels had been digging in the pots, I thought all the damage was minimal then I saw it the empty pot and label stick they had uprooted and made off with RDB. The devils don’t eat them I don’t think so I search all around not to be found. Then it clicked in my head I had disposed of 3 this week, they are getting back at me the best they can. I don’t think it’s pure coincidence, what are the chances? Well about 3.5% I guess as I had I think 27 2012 spring cuttings and 1 RDB.  I don’t know if I should take the war up a level and bring out the BOD (bucket of death) or try and make a truce  

Attached Images
jpeg Mulberry_rooting.JPG (134.03 KB, 36 views)


Subject: Grafting Question - will this work? Replies: 11
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,871
 
I guess I missed the point that you might want to keep the portion of the tree above the girdle. but with that girdle you are actually depending on 2 unions Top and bottom for the top to survive and you don't need to risk losing the top with the patch bud or the T or Chip buds. I am not talking specific  to figs, but in general I have had better luck with either the Chip or T buds, than a patch bud. I really don't see any advantage of total girdle.

Subject: Grafting Question - will this work? Replies: 11
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,871
 
I have never done that, but I have done a patch bud, where you don't girdle the whole receiving branch, but only a square from it. The bark really needs to be in slip mode, and to remove a full girdle of the of the desired patch in good shape might be tough.  The cambium contact on that would have to be on the bottom union, on the patch you have the sides and top as well. Not sure why  not just lop the top of that off as you would not even want the top anymore. Above any type of graft sometimes it is good to half break above the graft/bud and bending it down leaving some of the bark intact for a period until established so the stock should give energies to the graft. I never have real good results with the patch bud but that was years ago and on pecan trees, and nut trees are hard.

Subject: Fig Resurrection Replies: 2
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 479
 

I pulled a few of my figs out of humidity last week, One really took it tough and Friday looked like a goner. I put it back in humidity Friday and today he has risen. The label says Dottato, but I am thinking of labeling it J.C.


Subject: A new way of grafting that I found on YouTube ( from Greece) Replies: 14
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 765
 
Thats a  T bud been around for a long time. There is as well a inverted T bud where the horizontal cut is made at the bottom which is supposed to help with keeping water getting trapped and rotting the inserted bud.

Subject: Giant Loquat Replies: 26
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 2,021
 
Loquats are wonderful, The Trees are actually quite hardy thinking about 15 F. but in blooming fall/winter the fruit often gets hit by the cold, but even here north of Atlanta sometimes they manage fruit. That is a very nice sized fruit. I have several young seedlings I could graft to, if you want to send me 3 or 4 cuttings I  could try and graft them and send 1 or 2 back if successful

Subject: OT: Seeking other plants/cuttings Replies: 15
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 898
 
John,

Sounds like we are in same thinking. I am in move process as well to acreage, and in process trying to purchase some adjoining property.  If you don't graft already I would suggest it.  I have quite a bit of different plant material  to share/trade now or in the near future assuming you have appropriate rootstock. I  too have I lot of plants I have been nurturing  up in pots that  will see soil soon as well.

Subject: Tastey Pawpaws Replies: 58
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 3,403
 

I have 2 each both "Susquehanna" and "Shenandoah" and another of the Peterson selections “Potomac” from Forrest Keeling and have been pleased.  Their website does leave to be desired and you can’t really order online, so just call them, I think they mostly serve to wholesale but their service was fine to me. Their RPM method of growing seems to work well. The pots are small but a mass of fine roots, and oddly enough no distinct taproots. I received mine last year and potted them up in very tall pecan type pots. I assume they will develop the normal taproot. They grew better than Pawpaws I have received from other sources. The potted plants I have received from Stark brothers did fine as well. I would highly caution against bare-root pawpaw and most folks have disappointing results, I included. I think   potted from any reputable nursery is the way to go for Pawpaw, and I in generally prefer bare-rooted fruit trees, but that is a whole other discussion. I would caution against a nursery stating grown in pots then shipped bare root. Hidden Springs does this, and although they are reputable and I generally like them I don’t believe they do Pawpaw right, even though they offer a good selection. Of 8 trees from them I have 1 survivor. Of potted Pawpaw received from Keeling Forest and Starks I have lost none. I only have mine in pots for a year because I wanted to baby them the first year (shade/water/attention) and I am process of moving and so they will be in ground soon.


Subject: Tastey Pawpaws Replies: 58
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 3,403
 
I have several grafted cultivars, but they are small and not fruiting as yet. I have eaten alot of the natives, and while they often are found along woodland creekbanks they really only need protection from the sun for a couple years when young around my location, and are more productive with more sun. Additional shade may be needed in a hotter drier climate. One caution never eat a over-ripe pawpaw, or even the smell of pawpaw afterwards will make you nauseas. A slightly overripe may be ok, but they can be almost sickening sweet are very strong scented. My wife will not let me keep them in the fridge anymore. 

Subject: Is there an optimum humidity for rooting cuttings? Replies: 12
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,122
 
Bob,

I thought you were giving my word of the day to learn, but when I googled stomatae I am still not sure. Are you refering to stomata? Which is a new word for me as well so I guess still learned a word.

Subject: Re-met Jason today Replies: 3
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 569
 
Eden,

The exchange was held in Palmetto, Ga.  It is small forum on yahoo. It is not real active, and this is the second time they have gotten together that I am aware. A similar grafting demonstration about this time last year in downtown. It is general fruit based. I gave out half a large cooler of various scion, and still have several materials left if you have interest.  Mostly pears,apples, some pluots is what I have left. The Persimmon, Mulberry, Pomegrantes were cleaned out if you want a detailed list I post one. I should have posted about the meeting here. I know we have some Newnan members and this was in their backyard. A longer drive for me from Jasper. Here is the link to the Atlanta Fruits Group if anyone wants to subscribe.   Not real active, particularly compared to F4F.  http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Atlanta_Fruits/

Subject: Re-met Jason today Replies: 3
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 569
 

I was able to stop by satellitehead (Jason) place on the way to a Atlanta area Grafting/scion exchange workshop today. Jason was able to give me some nice cuttings for myself and to share at the exchange. Mike and Melinda there expressed thanks, and some other folks got some cuttings as well. I should have taken a picture of Jason and Family, but I would not have posted without consent, Couple of real cuties there. You better invest in a bigger stick than fig, because your little girl's smile is going have the young men come knocking.  Thanks again and best figs to you.


Subject: thanks for the mulberry cuttings! Replies: 18
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,283
 

Pete,

Hope you have better luck rooting them then I have and thanks for the Fig cutting in return.

 Illinois Everbearing mulberry I have read as being Alba, a AlbaXRubra Hybrid. I think the hybrid is correct.  Pakistan is normally categorized as Alba, but I am sure I have read opinions that it is Morus macroura. I surely don’t know the truth, only that I love them.

Despite the warnings Nigra will not do well for me in the southeast I am eager to try one but,Peaceful Valley (GrowOrganic) has really messed up my order. They had all my trees on hold waiting for my Mulberry to come in, then when everything was in they delayed shipping due to weather. Now they are stating they sold one of my Mulberry that was pulled in my order and are out of stock.  I think I am still getting my Black Beauty Nigra, but my bush form Pakistan they lost. Luckily I obtained Pakistan from a NAFEX contact last fall, but it is tree form, that’s what you have cuttings from Pete.  They have pretty poor customer service and acting like they were doing me a favor crediting back for the cost of the tree they lost. They initially were not even going to credit percentage shipping for the tree they are not sending. I just ask them send my order now before you re-sell something else. I have some Pluerry, Plouts, and the Nigra I don’t want to wait a year to get started. They had my whole order waiting for something that will not be in stock until next year!!  They refused just to send that tree next year when back in stock. Very poor service. Sorry about ranting.

 




Subject: Rice Hulls as alternative to Perlite Replies: 15
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 2,744
 
The rice hulls would compost and break down I believe. Perlite doesn't not that I have noticed. I know when I do my general potting I use pine bark fines that are just beginning to compost.  The pine barks fines start out light and well draining, after a time in the pot it composts. shrinks in volume, and loses the light free draining character and is basically heavy top soil. Pretty much anything that composts will turn out that way. The perlite helps retain that loose free draining and light weight character better than any thing else I have tried. Turface may not break down either, but it sure is a lot heavier than perlite, maybe not a big deal in 1 gal, but when you get to larger pots something to consider. Perlite I consider cheap at $12/4 cubic ft. I might look at the hulls to replace some of the pine bark fines however if I can find it in bulk as stable bedding, but around here I have only seen fresh sawdust avilable in bulk for stable bedding

Subject: OT. all these talks about mulberry is making me.. Replies: 16
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,572
 
Pete,

I have Illinois Everbearing scion if you want them, possibly a stick of Pakistan as well if you don’t want to wait on U.C. Davis/USDA  next year. Last year I tried  rooting the following cultivars from small cuttings. I was successful with a couple Shangri La and Middleton  but no success with Kokuso No. 20, Geraldi Dwarf, Pakistan or a bunch Illinois Everbearing from my own trees either. I was successful grafting with a basic bark graft, but foolish in grafting them on low branches and what did not get hit with a late freeze the deer broke some off.  I purchased a Geraldi Dwarf and a Pakistan last fall as small trees and have a Black Beauty Nigra tree on order as well as hopefully some scion coming from USDA (that was for Harvey)   

 

Subject: OT. all these talks about mulberry is making me.. Replies: 16
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,572
 

Morus Nigra (black)  is generally considered the best  tasting,  but It is often noted not to do well in the southeast  U.S. because  of the humidity. It is probably the least cold hardy as well,  but most are great tasting.   The Morus Alba (white) can be very variable in taste, and this is normally the tree that becomes very trashy and seeds all over.  I suspect the Alba would have been the trees you remember. Morus Rubra (red) our only native mulberry is normally very tasty, but for some reason there does not seem to be many named cultivars. It normally makes a larger tree. There are hybrids of AlbaXRubra like the Illinois Everbearing which is very good and one of the most widely available.  Silk Hope an A.J. Bullard selection that is supposed to do better in the southeast and he is in your area and would be one to look for.  Gerardi dwarf deserves consideration as it is supposed to stay very small, the nodes and fruit are very close as it is a true dwarf. Pakistan is widely available as well and has very large fruit.

Just a Note I am sure most are aware but Black, White, and Red have nothing to do with fruit color. As in many white have black fruit.


Couple sources that carry a variety.
http://whitmanfarms.com/category/all/edible-plants/mulberries
http://www.burntridgenursery.com/fruitingPlants/index_product.asp?dept=20&parent=7

Subject: Coming to a Home Depot near you Replies: 9
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 805
 
WillsC,

Is that Simpson's Nursery?

Subject: Cutting/plants are dying Replies: 24
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,326
 
I would think the wood stove pulling all the humidity out of air, and the fan probably factors as well. The young roots might not be able to keep up

Subject: A couple questions about cuttings Replies: 13
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,145
 
I think it's a hassle to double cup with a dome and harder to maintain a constant . I don't use plexi-glass I just use cheap 4 mil plastic  to tent over. I keep them in bin with the lids off. the the 4 mil plastic does need support, but while they are short  you can just lay some mini-blind slats or similar across the top. You can build a support for the plastic real cheap with PVC pipe and a few fittings. Don't bother gluing the pieces together the fittings fit together snug enough. when done pop apart and it stores easily and compact. I saw your Dog Agility pictures. I built most of my Daughters course out of PVC. Light, portable, durable, and cheap.  If you want go to the your Lowes garden center buy a couple plants unroll a section of the plastic (if it is the clear stuff)  they have at the exit to protect your care and while very thin will work as a humidity dome.

Subject: A couple questions about cuttings Replies: 13
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,145
 
I would suggest 14-16 hours/day under lights. On watering there are to many factors to generalize. I think you just have to watch them look for the mix lightening and moisture on the cup. I always struggle with moisture and seems I have to gauge each one different depending a lot on leaf development as well as the root development. Don't treat each cup the same, some may need water when other do not

Subject: Chinese New Year Wish List Giveaway Replies: 68
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 2,717
 
Wish list
Col de Dame Gris
RDB
Maltese Falcon
Maltese Beauty
Black Madeira
Bataglia green

Subject: Chinese New Year Wish List Giveaway Replies: 68
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 2,717
 
Wish list
Col de Dame Gris
RDB
Maltese Falcon
Maltese Beauty
Black Madeira
Bataglia green

Subject: any one have persimmons Replies: 30
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,423
 
I doubt you will be successful rooting them, I never known anyone successful in that. You need to look for root stock or graft them to your existing tree.

Subject: I want to learn how to Graft Replies: 23
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,787
 

Good video Harvey,

I use that same bark graft on almost everything I do, excepting maybe something like a Japanese maple where I care more about the aesthetics of the union.  For me without good small motor skills and clumsy it is the easiest graft to make good cambium contact. Making that small cut on the back side of each edge really helps. The only issue I have sometimes is that it is a weaker graft initially than many other grafts. If the scion really takes off sometimes I have had them break at the union. Just a little support with a small stick/bamboo can help when you see that.


Subject: Strange business promoting Replies: 38
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,279
 
I apologize on behalf of the state of Georgia for TY Ty and Arron's and all their other alias names. They are an embarrassment. 

Subject: any one have persimmons Replies: 30
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,423
 

I think I have 22 types of persimmon, with all except 1 American and a couple hybrids being Asian Kaki. Most are small and not fruiting as yet, and some just a young branch grafted on a tree.  They are wonderful low care trees and my only real issues with them has been late freezes after unseasonably warm weather in winter/spring.  Most Kaki are not nearly as seedy as most American Diospyros Virginiana trees. Some of the native American trees do set fruit without pollination, and don’t have much seed, but if you are in a area with a lot of native trees the males in the area will pretty much assure most are heavy seeded.  Some of the Kaki will be virtually seedless even if there is kaki with male flowers around. Most of your Kaki grafted cultivas are Female flowering and fruit is set without pollination.  Except in a rare instance the American and Kaki don’t pollinate each other. There is limited success in this even in a research type setting that’s why there are not many hybrids of American-Kaki. So if you want seedless fruit Kaki is the way to go, or if you don’t have native trees around plant an American like Yates known to produce fruit without a separate pollinator.  

Bass,
Interesting statement about the northern/southern Diospyros Virginiana rootstocks. I know that the 90-chromosome is native to the north and the native southern trees are 60-chromosome, but I never gave much thought they would be colder hardier,  but logic would suggest so with natural selection. I do believe most of the select cultivars are 90 chromosome trees, so they seem to have better fruit genetics as well.

And I agree dried persimmon is heavenly.  And Diospyros actually is Greek for something like Divine fruit or Fruit of the Gods.  I hope that last comment doesn’t offend the figs.  The Astringent cultivars tend to turn out better dried and as well don’t get bothered by animals and birds as much.  They can be picked while still astringent and still ripen wonderfully

Subject: How Old Am I ? Replies: 79
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 3,518
 
I think it's where the dog is allowed to relieve himself. I know I stated urine prior. and guess i was more than a second off on the age. 

Subject: How Old Am I ? Replies: 79
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 3,518
 
Not Dennis, but pretty sure  it was 59 seconds, it's much to tall for 58 seconds.

Subject: How Old Am I ? Replies: 79
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 3,518
 
8 years 9 months 12 days 18 hours 46 minutes and 59 seconds and only fertlized with urine

Subject: More fig lovers on board... Replies: 53
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,562
 
 Congratulations Jason

Subject: it's 20 and snowing outside.. and in my garage.. Replies: 11
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 643
 
Pete,

If you close the door It probably cease to snow in your garage :)

Subject: New Fig Site Replies: 53
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 3,503
 

Barry,

Very well said,

At least some of things that initiated the exodus I completely agree with them on, but I guess we all have varying levels of tolerance.  I have wasted my time growing fruit trees that proved not true to name, and it’s frustrating.  I will stay around here for sure, but don’t know if I will join over there as I am always online through a VPN and my employer blocks me getting to the site. I get called day and night for my job support so I always am on the VPN.  In fact they are probably monitoring each of my keystrokes so I better get back to work.


Subject: FEIJOA..."Pineapple Guava" Replies: 27
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,922
 
I got to taste a few fruit from my plants for the 1st time this fall and I loved it. It really does have a pineapple taste, and very similar to Hardy Kiwi to me in texture and taste. They are pretty tart  but I like that. Mine are not named cultivars and surprised they have survived for me. The blooms are very tasty as well, like cotton candy melting in your mouth. I think some chefs use them in fresh salad.

Subject: sealing cutting tips with wax from toilet bowl wax ring Replies: 18
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 3,574
 
I have used it for Grafting wax as well, although I normally use Parafilm I think it would work fine for sealing the cutting

Subject: What is this white stuff on the fig cuttings! Replies: 12
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,431
 
Much of that is not root initials. do a search on lenticels or white fluff you will see a lot of discussion regarding it.

Subject: Vertical or Horizontal in Sphagnum moss Replies: 9
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 741
 
Just a quick followup. I kept the cuttings vertical and noticed a big difference. Hardly any roots developing high on the cuttings. I had them in Gal Ziplocks in sphagnum with the bag open in a closed bin so I did not have to open each individually for fresh air. When I kept the cuttings horizontal  I had rooting all along the cutting. Not a controlled environment as I did score and use Dip-N-Grow this time as well, but it sure seems to me keeping the cuttings vertical concentrated my root development at the bottom of the cutting 

Subject: CHE not totally Off Topic, but close Replies: 16
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,215
 
I grafted my trees from U.C. Davis scion. I don't know if its male or female but they list it as seedless.   Boris, I can send you some scion.  I have a couple plums and persimmons coming your way  shortly, and another couple sticks in the package if you want.  I was up taking cuttings today.

Subject: off topic: peach Replies: 11
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 767
 

I was going to make a suggestion, but it seems persianmd2orchard reads my mind, or more likely reading the same data :)  Zaiger’s Arctic  series are supposed to be great, but I don’t know of anybody who has had success in the southeast.   

I did have a question for Eden however. Are you growing nectarine with good success in our area. I don’t grow any as I have always been under the impression they are tougher than peaches.  


Subject: Tasty description of figs Replies: 37
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 2,853
 
Ok now I understand "POA - Pass Out Amazing (12!)" of course you can't keep eating them in a

unconscious state. A 11 you can just keep on stuffing them away, but I think you should change the tittle to "Lays" Because  you can't just eat one


Subject: CHE not totally Off Topic, but close Replies: 16
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,215
 
I think it a very tough plant, both heat and cold tolerant, and I don't believe pest problems. I think the fruit is bland unless the fruit is allowed to get very ripe. Years ago when I tasted it was probably under ripe. Mine  were grafted spring 2011 and have not fruited yet, but a common complaint is the fruit dropping prior to ripe. The pollination need is debatable as well. Some places indicate you need a male other say not needed. Seems one of those fruits people either love or dislike.

Subject: CHE not totally Off Topic, but close Replies: 16
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,215
 

CHE, Melon Berry , Cudrang. Stretching the FIG bit here, but they are related to figs, although I believe closer to mulberry. Folks have expressed interest here before, so offering up some  scion for grafting for shipping cost only. This is supposedly a seedless one, has not fruited for me as of yet. Jon has some good pictures here under his Fruiting Plant collection link. http://encantofarms.com/collection.html  I don’t believe rooting  them is easy, and only from softwood in summer, this is dormant wood.  They graft easily to Osage orange, or of course to Che itself. Those of you in the midwest/plains states should have no problem locating Osage orange seedlings.  They are the Maclura pomifera, also  commonly called, hedge-apple,  Horse-apple, and is what all most the hedge rows in the plains state are. The Che is a very thorny tree at least in it's juvenile state.

Subject: Tasty description of figs Replies: 37
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 2,853
 

Ok Dennis now you know what we want. Your figs all listed on those 2 charts. You are one of the most colorful commentators of figs here. I remember the list you did before had me salivating. It might even be cruel to do it this time of year, but torture us.

And I want to know what happened to 11 don't you like that number?


Subject: Cutting planting depth Replies: 23
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,139
 
I guess I was trying to combine the methods starting them in sphagnum moss and then moving them into the small 3x8 uline type bags. I understand now that you put the cuttings straight into the bag with no pre-rooting. So many variations I guess. How long will they make it in the 3x8 until you move them up to a pot, and do you use anything in the bin to keep them vertical? With  bags side by side they seemed to crowded when leafs developed when I tried them. 

Thanks


Subject: Real Reason we are here Replies: 30
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,233
 
Mention of Excel with 0-3 surprised me, my results are never as good as many here, but I had best results with Excel last year. Sometimes it's just the condition of the cuttings

Subject: Cutting planting depth Replies: 23
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,139
 
Yes Jennifer  Thanks That's what I am thinking about moving to a more narrow version if I can find them. Those have the open bottom with sort of a basic cross support I think.

Subject: Cutting planting depth Replies: 23
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,139
 
Luke,
 I tried the bags, for that very reason last season on part of my plants, maybe I am too clumsy or maybe I need to put in the bags before the roots get as large as I let them for a cup.  I kept damaging them putting in and handling afterwards trying to keep them upright and spaced out. how do you folks get the bags upright spaced out enough so they are not crowded?

 

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