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Subject: Cutting planting depth Replies: 23
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,139
 

My problem is getting the cup container with enough height The 16 oz cups are only about 5 inches high If I put 1.5 inch soil below the cutting and on a 10 inch cutting and it’s hard to only have the top node or 2 exposed.  You are looking at 3.5 under potting mix and a longer section exposed.  Even the 24 oz cups or 32 oz containers are not much taller only wider.  Last year I halved the cutting or shortened but really don’t want to do that based on what I read about ideal cutting. I am trying cutting the bottom of a 16 oz out inserting it in a 9 oz and that gets me about 7.5 inches in height. I am think about looking for the small tree bands.


Subject: Grafting Pictures Replies: 25
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,435
 

Bill,

I will send along Hosui, just another couple sticks in the package:) I have not tasted it yet. I just put the tree in last spring, so did not have it when I sent the other Pear material last year. I am assuming some of these grafts are them. You have good branching established on that tree. The Asians seem to want to grow straight up for me and I am not real diligent about training for wide branch angles and regretting it already. The tree being 1st year is one of them I hope to try and relocate to my new place within the next 2 months.

 I didn’t get to taste but one Asian pear last year as a late spring freeze after a very warm NON-winter here had everything way ahead and most all my fruit/nut  was lost last year. Even my chestnuts and the only other year they were hit was Easter Freeze 2007.  I did have Fire Blight issues with Asians last year for the first time.  Niitaka had it the worst; Olympic had some hits, but Shinko I do not believe at all. It’s the 1st year I had major bloom on my young trees and the bees spread FB around.


Subject: Grafting Pictures Replies: 25
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,435
 
Good job Bill,

If you want a branch of Hosui on that Asian Pear tree I can put a stick in with the other stuff when I send

Subject: What the heck are these???? Replies: 32
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,582
 
Sorry, I left off the what to do. If you tree's are small enough just locate and squish them. I have never found them on my figs, but a different species I do get on my Japanese Maples.  I think sometimes dormant oil is used, but if a small number just detach and crush. With the coat of waxy substance they can be hard to hit with chemicals

Subject: What the heck are these???? Replies: 32
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,582
 
That is a scale insect I beleive

Subject: low cost soil and container suggestions? Replies: 22
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,278
 
Find a local Grower's supply places for perlite I use Griffin Greenhouse supplies.  I get I think 4 cubic foot bag for around $13. You should be able to find in NC Pete that where alot of it comes from. My bag is from Carolina Perlite Inc out of Gold Hill NC. As stated by other search "nursery pots" on craig's list, I found some selling for 5 cents/gal regardless the size of the pot.

Subject: I'm possibly an idiot? Replies: 29
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,565
 
Loquats should be fine into the teens, If you want some more I have some for you, but they were out in the same cold. Last year I did not bring in them in at all.

Subject: Do we make this to hard? Replies: 20
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,138
 

Some great reasoning here, keeping your hand in the soil probably is good therapy for the winter blues. I might be a little different as winter is really pretty busy in the garden for me. Particularly this year in the middle of a move. Give me 40 F. and a shovel and I’m happy, and this year I better keep digging. Between fruit tree orders coming in and relocating some I have planted within the last couple years I will be planting probably 70 fruiting trees, that’s not even counting figs, berries.  And you mention Japanese Maples I will finally have a good place to plant my potted collection of about 120 maples many in 10/15 gal, and few in 30 gal. Add probably another 200 + other potted plants I have been growing up in my nursery area, and the shovel hours add up. Last week I estimate I dug up and re-planted 6000 narcissus /daffodils.  Surprising how a single bulb planted years ago is now an over-crowded clump of 30 that needed divided badly. The numbers add up quickly. I was only able to get them back in the ground in vegetable garden style in rows of worked ground. In coming years I will get them worked back into the landscape.  But there is only so much light this time of year. I think most of my cutting care will take place in bowels of night


Subject: Do we make this to hard? Replies: 20
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,138
 

Vince,

I saw your video, hope you didn’t plan on Holiday dinner at your place.

Barry,

My wife would call you an enabler, offering up nice cuttings.  

Frank,

Impatient is a big part, but right now after being humbled a couple years forget the challenge I just want to succeed.


Subject: Do we make this to hard? Replies: 20
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,138
 

I think sometimes we make things a lot more difficult then it needs to be.  This will be the first time I try to start cuttings this early. I know not everybody is sitting in the same climate zone, but when we are trying to start cuttings 5-6 months prior to when they can be moved outside seems like we are fighting Mother Nature.  2 years ago I tried to wait until March to obtain cuttings, but really had no luck as most the cuttings exchanges had already happened. Last year I tried to obtain cuttings earlier and store them through and start in spring, but my results were not that great in that manner either. I know cuttings do store and many do well storing them, but I don’t think a lot of the greener cuttings store that well. I might be trying to rationalize my poor rooting skills however, but I just think the best place to store cuttings is on the tree. I understanding that a outside tree cutting might be dead wood come spring  and that’s  explains much, but I have to think part of it is our impatience  that we have to come up with all the space, lighting, dormancy, etc… issues.  Next year I might go back to my original logic and time starting my cuttings to be ready for potting up on Mother Natures schedule.  I guess when my wife gets feed up with this irrational behavior and throws me out I won’t have to worry about who gets the figs, they will be getting good light laying right there is the street beside me in the gutter.


Subject: will cutting with enough root survive winter in garage? Replies: 10
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 626
 
My concern is not so much them handling cold, but more they don't have the energy reserves to go dormant and come back, and thinking in that environment they will not stay in active growth.

Subject: First fig grafts Replies: 27
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,689
 
Another reason I need a greenhouse. I have fresh cuttings now, but only plants entering dormancy. Thanks for the explanation.

Subject: First fig grafts Replies: 27
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,689
 
Surprised to see you grafting presently in zone 4. I have grafted a lot of different plants, but only a couple figs. Normally grafting would be done just prior or shortly after breaking dormancy.  When I first started grafting I think my biggest error was grafting too early on dormant plants. Interested in the results at this timing, but if you folks are successful  I will be doing it then air layer it off later as I think I am a better grafter than rooter and I could get multiple scion off a single cutting.

Subject: Vertical or Horizontal in Sphagnum moss Replies: 9
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 741
 
Thanks Folks,

That's just what I was asking. I will put the plastic shoe box on end this time and some may be in Gal Zip locks but I will try to keep everything vertical. And I probably misspoke stating the very top. I don't believe I had roots from the top cut, just probably the top node. I believe I messed up trying to cut them into cuttings last year based on the input in a recent thread. This year I will just let those roots fade as has been suggested. Hoping the vertical helps and don't see how it would hurt. 

Subject: Vertical or Horizontal in Sphagnum moss Replies: 9
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 741
 

When starting your cuttings in sphagnum moss have you noticed any difference if they are kept vertical or horizontal?  Last year I had them horizontal and the roots were coming out all over from the very top on some, like in some recent posts where there are roots above soil line when potting up.  If kept vertical while in the sphagnum moss with maybe even the top couple inches exposed I am thinking the cuttings might orient it more readily when moved to potting mix. Experience and opinions appreciated.


Subject: Dip n grow Replies: 10
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,026
 
Thanks

Subject: Dip n grow Replies: 10
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,026
 

I use Dip-n-grow on other plants but never have for figs, but I have considered it. How far up on the cutting are you using the hormone and at what dilution rate 20X? The scores you find effective are you actually slicing a thin strip of the bark cambium off or just cutting to the wood without removing any material?

Thanks


Subject: Hardy pomegranates Replies: 75
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 9,632
 
Harvey,

Curious what cultivars you are culling, and hoping It doesn't overlap to much with my recent acquired list. Mother nature I am sure will provide the initial culling for me hoping she leaves me a few options. Any Softer seeded ones you think might be hardy? I picked up a Sumbar, think there was a thread on your forum regarding it might be hardy or at least early.

Subject: Hardy pomegranates Replies: 75
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 9,632
 
Rex,

One great source  of Pomegranate Cuttings is UC Davis if you ordering fig cuttings they can be ordered and sent at the same time. Several places are selling more cultivars now, but I really don't know who sells cuttings. I have 3 young cultivars I take a few cuttings from if you have interest. I have about 12 more cultivars I just picked up this fall as started cuttings. Some places like Green seas farms  are selling a bunch of cultivars and reasonable priced at $10 for a started plant.

Subject: Cuttings from Greece Replies: 42
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 3,291
 
PM sent

Subject: 12/21/12 is coming! what are you taking with you? Replies: 27
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,370
 
I better pack the ones that can take the heat, and all the Brown Turkey I can tote. Jason can find some joy knowing BT is burning in Hell

Subject: Warning - Fraudulent seller on eBay Replies: 68
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 2,568
 
TMC,
That's cruel, I want a good fig right now so bad.

Subject: Fruit Rich Fig Poor Replies: 23
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,811
 
Pepe,
Sorry for the late reply, just saw your question. Rooting persimmon is not easy if even possible. I believe I have read of folks successful, but persimmons is a grafting game. If someone else has been successful rooting persimmon please let me know I would be interested in the detail.

Subject: object of experimentation Replies: 5
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 597
 
FrankenFig

Subject: Mullberries Replies: 12
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 987
 

From my experience they respond well to pruning, and I know folks that pollard them, but you might consider a Geraldi Dwarf they stay real small and in AZ you might be able to grow Morus Nigra many which retain a bush shape, and Nigra Have the best Flavor so although it isn’t recommended to do well in my area I have one on order.  Illinois Everbearing and that type are very vigorous growers. If you are interested in some you can contact me.


Subject: shipping to CA Replies: 34
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,550
 

I did  read the topic and I don’t see the original post being “anti shipping to California” , but sincere in asking , and  who could blame them for asking.  Regulations are not always easily interpreted, and there sure is enough contradiction and misleading statements on the forum here.


Subject: shipping to CA Replies: 34
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,550
 
Where did you read "nobody in california can get cuttings?"

And I would be willing to bet I have more and bigger guns. California like to regulate them as well.

Subject: shipping to CA Replies: 34
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,550
 

Suzi,

All I read was Harvey relating what he was what he was told when contacting the agencies that govern the plant and nursery industry.  If you read his post you would see he runs a plant/nursery business out of California, Chestnuts if I am correct who he is. He as well was stating “I don't see any specific restriction to Ficus specifically so dormant cuttings are probably clear to be shipped, but soil from many states is restricted” Everything he wrote seems to be in an informative manner. California does it seems have more restrictive regulations than most states, that’s why you see the posts on California, as well as being the heart of various fruit industries which makes perfect sense  of those regulations.  I know Jon takes care to look into these regulations.  Just because you have received many cuttings from many places without any issues you are aware of doesn’t say anything other then someone sent them and you received them.  I think if you are that concerned you should do as you say and “contact all states ag restrictions” and report back what you find.  It seems like Harvey already has looked into some of that. I am not from CA. I am from GA, and I sure don’t know all the regulations, but I like others read the link above and saw nothing specific to Figs/Ficus.   I doubt that the California fruit industry has any real comfort that a household insecticide RAID , probably not even listed on fruiting plants is protecting their interests.


Subject: Lost my fig loving dad last night Replies: 67
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 2,257
 
Praying for you family Ed. That's a rough year.

Subject: 5 cuttings = 10 new starters Replies: 19
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,300
 
Interesting. I wish you success, but I will be a little surprised if the graft takes on a un-rooted cutting, seems to go against my general thoughts on grafts, but I guess a graft union taking might not be that different than callusing. That's makes this fun trying different approaches, be sure and  report back. If successful will  you then airlayer to get on it’s own roots?

Subject: Blunder Of The Month Replies: 22
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,325
 
Could you not have just drilled the holes with the cup filled? I know I have added additional holes after potted.

Subject: Fruit Rich Fig Poor Replies: 23
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,811
 
I don't think any Asian would make it 5a without some winter protection,  but I know of at least one individual that is trying and details what he is doing in the linked thread
Kaki and Hybrid Persimmons winter protection for Zone 5A

Subject: Fruit Rich Fig Poor Replies: 23
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,811
 
I like it Bob. I have 2 small trees in smaller pots that shuttle in through colder periods and they are just about ripe now. I only get a few fruits off each but they are wonderful. I believe this is one of the cultivars that shows up as "Cuties" locally for me, but I might be incorrect on that.

Subject: Importing disease/citrus greening Replies: 9
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 888
 

I agree with TMC2009 100% if I understand what you are trying to tactfully say here. I have been biting my lip a lot of recent, not wanting to offend folks but when I read of people just ignoring laws that are in place for reasons just like this it upsets me. I was ignorant and tried to make international trade prior to reading here that it was prohibited so I am guilty as well as ignorance is not an excuse. It bothers me when I read right in the same thread discussing regulations people seem to be saying I will do it anyway, or saying “don’t say we can’t do it, because we do”.  Yes you do, and most likely the material will arrive undetected and without carrying any harmful pest or disease, but that is how things like this spread, and with world commerce and trade what it is it’s probably just a matter of time, until every pest or disease that can survive in your environment shows up there, but I don’t want to speed that up personally. I hope no one takes this personally, but I have been thinking the whole importation risk over a lot of recent, and I am not just discussing international, but within states as well. The regulations may seem overboard at times, and in some cases may be but they are still in place


Subject: Fruit Rich Fig Poor Replies: 23
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,811
 

Pepe,

 

Persimmon is low care relative to a lot of trees and most people don’t spray them at all. They are one of my favorite fruit to grow. Your biggest concern if borderline 6/7 would be cold hardiness, but many people zone 6 grow them without issues, The biggest problem I have had was a late spring cold spell after  last years very warm winter, I had probably 4 cultivars that I thought I was going to taste for the first time but everything was in full bloom when hit, and many were just planted last spring and many were knocked back.

 

 As to taste I like both astringent and non-astringent. The non-astringent (you can eat when hard)  I find  most cultivar similar in taste if picked at the same stage of ripeness. The astringent differ a little more in taste and texture to my palate.  I have tasted a lot more cultivars then those from my own trees. If you are looking for Scionwood I can provide some for you. If you want you could stop by my plantings some time as you stated you are in my area.

 

Below is a readout I posted on another forum regarding how the cultivars did in after a relative light freeze LATE freeze.

 

In review of the damage of late spring light freeze around 27 F after extended warm spring. I had 30+ trees in ground, but only one of most cultivars which is not sufficient to fully evaluate. In particular when the cultivar I have multiples of did not all fare the same. I have Fuyu from 5 different sources, although one appears to me to be Jiro (called Fuyu sometimes on west coat). For instance 2 Fuyu trees planted 15 feet apart from same source same day in 2009 seemingly identical in vigor and health. One tree dead to the ground with only below ground rootstock shoots recovering, the other total loss of foliage but minimal wood damage and fully re-leafed. With that in mind below is report of how my different cultivars seemed to manage the late freeze after growth had started. I don't recall which cultivars were just breaking bud as opposed to being fully leafed but I believe that probably factored in damage. My plantings are located in small creek valley of bottom land with high ridgeline to both sides. My setting/micro-climate is not ideal, but my bottom land is cleared and my higher sloping land is fully forested so it's the space I have available present. I plan on moving later this year to a location I can reside with my plantings. My current plantings are about an hour drive from my residence, and initially I hope to manage both sites. Probably too much information but the difference in temperature in within a few hundred feet with a elevation change can be significant and I believe is more informative then the actual cultivar results.

All trees were completely defoliated with the exception of Rosseyanka and Tamopan. Rosseyanka was not a surprise faring the best, but Tamopan was. Again limited data(1 tree) is of limited value.

Fuyu - In general my Fuyu took more damage then most, 2 trees took minimal wood lose, 3 trees totally lost above graft, and others took significant wood loss. The reason I have so many Fuyu trees, as it is the most widely available tree and among my oldest trees aging from 2009 2010
Matsumoto Wase Fuyu - 2010 trees 1 tree dead to graft, 1 tree major wood loss, 1 tree limited wood loss
Izu - 1st year tree limited wood loss, 2010 Fuyu grafted over to Izu limited wood loss
Eureka - 2010 tree moderate wood loss
Great Wall - 2010 tree minimal wood loss
Saijo - 2010 tree minimal to no wood loss
Tamopan - 2009 tree retained around 50% foliage minimal wood loss. Abnominally? Never heard this tree reported as hardy, but it is an older larger tree, but so were the Fuyu beside it.
Jiro - 2010 tree lost to below graft

1st year tree limited wood loss
Rosseyanka Retained significant foliage, maybe no wood loss
Nikita's Gift
Izu
Ichikikeijiro

1st year tree significant wood loss
Giombo
Sheng
Maekawa Jiro


1st year tree Major wood loss
Hachiya
Hao River
Unknown Huge PCNA
Tanennashi

Young grafts still in pots protected
Giomba (same as Giombo? Listed separate on UC Davis source site)
Okugosho
Tam Kam
Suruga
Cheintang


Subject: Money Saving Idea (video) Replies: 9
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 819
 
That's what I use, after a couple years they can get brittle, but as long as you watch them. I as well use a single hole paper punch and tie them on a branch.

Subject: Who have you already met? Replies: 86
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 5,486
 
I would be interested as well I met a couple locals at a scion swap and grafting demo last spring with the Atlanta Fruits Group. It's a yahoo forum and and not very active but it is nice to make local contacts

Subject: perlite ?? Replies: 15
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,386
 
Check out the Grower's supply places in you area. I get I think 4 cubic foot bags for around $13 at griffins. It is a good source for better soil mixes like Fafards as well.

http://www.griffins.com/locations/index.asp

Subject: Info on Smith variety? Replies: 44
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,974
 
The search they are reffering is the internal search to this site. I just bumped one thread with a link to Mr. Robin's contact info.

Subject: Mr. Robin's inventory list for the reminder of 2011 Replies: 16
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,463
 
bump for those of you looking for Mr. Robin's contact info

Subject: Who can be crowned craziest fig fanatic? Replies: 43
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 2,099
 
I recently bought over $300,000.00 in potting soil

Subject: Figs and ? Replies: 27
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,436
 

The Citrus are potted and I move inside as needed during the winter. Concord is a tough grape and will probably do as well as anything for bunch/table grapes. I hadn't really heard of Niagara being that disease resistant but maybe I will have to research that. The ones out of U. Florida some being Blue Lake, Lake Emerald and Daytona would be ones to consider as well, but I have not heard great reviews of taste and production on them.  I have not been able to give my grapes the care they need with them located remote from my house.  I am in the process of moving so hoping to remedy that. My wife doesn't care for Muscadines either, with her I think it is more the texture and the skins and seeds. To me they have very complex flavor and an explosion of taste not just sweet I love them. You need to grow Kaki persimmon as they are wonderful and low care. I had cold damage pretty bad last spring, but I am still high on them as a great fruit for our area.  Mulberry, PawPaw and Sour Cherry should be considered as well.


Subject: Figs and ? Replies: 27
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,436
 

For Pomegranate in North GA would suggest some of the more cold hardy such as  Kazke, Salavatski, Surh-Anor, Kaj-acik-anor,  Lyubimyi.  I am trying most of those and some others. I have had poor results with table grapes, but they basically have to take care of themselves where I have them planted, but I would suggest Mars or some other the other University of Arkansas that supposedly have more disease resistance for the southeast as a objective of their program.. If you want grapes here Muscadines are easy and require little care here.  Probably most the hardy Kiwi would do well for you. I have had a problem with late spring cold spell with them but that is mostly due to the location I have them planted.  Attached is a fairly complete listing of what I am growing in your area, but don’t assume that everything on the list will do good here as I am trying several things I expect to be failures

 
Attached Files
pdf Fruits.pdf (12.58 KB, 18 views)


Subject: I had the pleasure to met Jason Replies: 15
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 972
 
Count me in.

Subject: anyone has hardy kiwi cuttings? Replies: 10
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 800
 
whoops see you have them in greenhouse, I was hoping maybe the Gold were more hardy then I thought

Subject: anyone has hardy kiwi cuttings? Replies: 10
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 800
 
Tyler,
My experience with Issai has been the same as yours in not being reliablly self-fertile.  I started some seedling of Zespri Gold as well 2nd year for them and still in the pot, but I am doubting they will ever be hardy for me I assume you plan on protecting them?

Subject: anyone has hardy kiwi cuttings? Replies: 10
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 800
 
Pete I have  Anna,  Issai , i Meader male and Kiwi Hayward (Fuzzy) I can send you

Subject: Spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii Replies: 17
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,172
 

These are not your common Fruit Fly Drosophila species that primarily attack rotting or fermenting fruit. It attacks undamaged fruit, and I am surprised to start hearing the damage done on Pomes such as apples, it seems not only soft fruits are targeted.


Subject: Spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii Replies: 17
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,172
 

Kerry, I just googled some more and seems you are right unfortunately.  I did not realize it had spread as much already.  It seems very hard to control so maybe I can just learn to like their taste. Ants don’t bother me much anymore, but I don’t care for squirmy wormy things. I was reading on a different forum of a long time fruithead that is very discouraged due to this pest.  I had not heard much about them in regards to figs other than they do like them.

Suzi, not sure if I even want to research on the sharpshooter, sounds mean and I don’t need anything more to worry about right now.


Subject: Spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii Replies: 17
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,172
 
Question mostly for you folks on West Coast that have Spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii fruit fly in your area.  How big of problem has it been with Figs for you? I know it has really created major problems with berries like raspberry, blackberry etc…  and preferring  soft fruits and I would think it would love figs.  It has been found in Florida as well so I guess it is just a matter of time until we see it spread in the east as well.

 


 

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