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Subject: Hardy pomegranates Replies: 75
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 9,632
 

I have an Angel Red, mine should fruit next year I hope. I have tried the fruit and it is a softer seed as I recall with good flavor. I have tasted Eight Ball as well, that's why I referred to it as a ornamental. I think the color is why it was selected, not the taste.  In FL you have a wide selection that will grow well for you U.F. has  a project evaluating many types. See link below with a lot of great info in the drop down menu.  I prefer a sweet/tart mix but there are ones without tartness.

http://www.crec.ifas.ufl.edu/extension/pomegranates/


Subject: Hardy pomegranates Replies: 75
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 9,632
 

I just picked up 8 more cultivars last weekend.  Besides the  Salavatski and Kazke listed prior, Kaj-acik-anor, Surh-anor and Sumbar are reported some of the more hardy.  Early ripening can be as big a factor in a colder climate as well.  As far as I know Eight Ball is mostly an ornamental type. 

 For ripening I think it is best to wait until the skin starts to taunt up a bit and become a little leathery at least that's what I have tried with my limited experience. If it starts to split pick it. Color of the skin or the arils is not always a good indication and as stated not all cultivars are the Red of the familiar "Wonderful" cultivar found in the U.S. marketplaces.

  

Subject: Free cuttings contest Replies: 147
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 8,470
 
fragrancia de barata

Subject: Just wanted to have a look Replies: 7
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 745
 
Lou,

You have another PawPaw for Pollination right? England's is a good source and Cliff is knowledgable plantsman.

Subject: Time to beg borrow and steal Replies: 8
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,130
 
strudeldog on GW as well

Subject: Time to beg borrow and steal Replies: 8
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,130
 
BR,

welcome to F4F,  I recognize your plant listing from G.W. fruits and orchards. I might have a fig or 2 that would interest you, see my listing of plants I am growing in current post of "Fruit Rich Fig Poor". Where did you source your Dekopon, Kishu, and Gold Nugget in Florida?

Subject: Bought a Hardy Chicago from Lowe's today...(pics) Replies: 26
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,568
 
My Chicago hardy are from Lowes as well, but a few years back, glad to hear folks think it is legit. I have had bad luck with mis-labeled muscadines from them. I think it matters who their supplier on the plants is.

Subject: Fruit Rich Fig Poor Replies: 23
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,811
 

Sounds Good Jason,

Those are all planted in-ground at Ellijay. The Goumi were just planted this spring from Just Fruits and Exotics. I have a single plant each of Goumi Red Gem and Goumi Sweet Scarlet. They grew well and even flowered and kept a few fruit which they lost in a late freeze but the plants grew well. I will have to see if they can be air-layered.  I can defiantly get you scion wood for Sherwood and LI Jujube, maybe another as well. I will have to see how much the branches I grafted on 2 other cultivar have grown.  I don’t believe Jujube cuttings can be rooted easily, so you might need rootstock as well, which I might be able to provide as that same late freeze killed one of my 2 eight foot Sherwood to the ground. I was very surprised as they are listed hardy to well below zero, but it was in active growth and that changes everything.  It has put out some new growth as suckers from the roots and thinking those could be dug as rootstock. I have 3 Pixwell gooseberries and you can have them. They are of the size that can be dug easily. I don’t have them in an ideal setting and they have not fruited yet.  They are a fruit with some shade tolerance and I planted them at the woodlands edge on a bank.  Illinois Everbearing mulberry I will have cuttings again although I have not had luck rooting them, if you have seedling mulberry around they graft easy. I might have a couple other Mulberries available. I failed rooting Pakistan, but was successful with Shangri La and Middleton. I had Pakistan grafted on my I.E. tree but deer broke it off, so I have on order for next spring, so Akram if you are reading I know you posted about wanting Pakistan a while back and I told you I planed on ordering and I will remember. If you plan on heading up North for a fall family drive, and you would like to stop by the plantings in Ellijay let me know maybe I could meet you up there. I will be busy moving, but at least I am shortening my commute my new residence will be in the Jasper area.


Subject: Fruit Rich Fig Poor Replies: 23
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,811
 

Thanks Jason,
A great plus being local. Let me know what specifically you are interested in.     

Gene is correct about Loquat. The tree is stated quite hardy to the low teens F. ,  but it flowers fall into winter and I think the flowers/fruit are lost above 20 F, but surprisingly enough, some years it manages to fruit here north of Atlanta. The picture is some I picked late spring 2011, and they were so good. I used to grow them years ago in Florida.  I have tasted many that were not anything special as well. I don’t have any select grafted cultivar present, but I have some seedlings from those fruit pictured, they are small and potted and still in my nursery area. These fruit/ flowers would have pretty much  have to survived temps in the lower teens if I am recalling the winter 2010-2011 correct, and I thought maybe I had found a more cold hardy selection, but when I posted about it on a local Atlanta fruit forum it seems several folks local had loquats fruiting that year.

Attached Images
jpeg DSCN2310-s.jpg (136.55 KB, 34 views)


Subject: Fruit Rich Fig Poor Replies: 23
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,811
 

Most of my in-ground planting are located at my cabin property which is 10 acres with about 3 acres open creek bottom land, the rest is heavily wooded.  My present residence is on heavy shaded acre with nothing much in ground there excepting a few kiwi and my potted figs and citrus, I will be moving from this location and close Oct 1st on my new residence that is 9+ acres and probably half that is open land so  I will have significant space to plant. I had planed on moving full time to my cabin with my plantings, but plans changed, and for now at least I will be growing on both sites.

The trees at my cabin property range from age from several  nuts trees being planted in 1998, fruiting  trees begin planting in fall 2008 through last spring.  Some things planted last spring I will try and move to my new location this winter. I purchased 12 new persimmon cultivar from Just Fruits and Exotics which was my major expansion last year and they will be moved. A lot of what I am trying will probably do better for you in Texas then for me here. Some things like the Pineapple Guava might never survive here, but they made in through last winter with no damage. Persimmon does well in Texas as I understand. Pomegranates should do great in Texas, and I would think Muscadines would as well. I only have one mature Fuzzy kiwi but you are welcome to cuttings. It is at my present residence and have it growing up a tree in to much shade, and it right now is 30-40+ up into the tree, last time it got that high I pruned it back to 6 feet. I never even see blooms on it I believe because of the shade, my male Fuzzy died regardless, and I have heard differing opinions if a male hardy will pollinate it.  I did start some Golden Fuzzy Kiwi (Chinensis I believe) from seed but they will never be cold hardy for me here I fear. Have you ever tried the Golden kiwi, they are excellent and taste distinctly different from the standard fuzzy kiwi.


Subject: Fruit Rich Fig Poor Replies: 23
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,811
 

Well maybe not fruit rich yet but I am trying a lot of different fruiting plants. Hopefully I successfully attached a PDF of what I am growing and looking to arrange some exchanges later on in the dormant season. This is one of my track sheets and not really a trade sheet. Many of my plants are young and not producing yet and a few things on my list are not doing well like my bunch grapes. Anything with a gone in the title means dead. Some things are still under Plant Patent as well.  If you have interest just ask about it. I am mainly looking for Figs as listed below. My current figs are listed on the PDF as well. I have not traded much on the forum, mostly sending out non-fig material, but I hope those folks are happy with what they received.  I am not a very successful rooter, so if you have a duplicate started small plant that would be a plus for me.  I have gotten a little better success rooting, mostly due to reading this forum, The figs I am looking for in a rough order of desire.  RDB, Adriatic JH, Scott's Black, Stella, Bataglia Green, Hollier,  Florea, Dark Portuguese, Parfum De Cafards. There are others I have interest in as well so not limited to those.

Best Figs to all

 
Attached Files
pdf Fruits.pdf (12.58 KB, 124 views)


Subject: This is when you pick figs! Replies: 7
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 769
 
Mine seldom get that far without the birds, Ants, or other pests getting them, but then I don't protect them as they ripen like some of you do.

Subject: What are the opinions on Turface MVP? Replies: 36
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 4,370
 
Gina has it right. It's not really marketed as a soil supplement. Find out who maintains your high school baseball field. You probably have a local supplier just not your garden centers. Still I am sure they are aware of this secondary market and seeming foolish not to cater to it. If your garden center wanted to order some I am sure they would be glad to deliver it.

Subject: HELP - OFF TOPIC - AMERICAN CHESTNUT TREE Replies: 9
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 961
 
Bob that is not a tendril or root or anything from the nut starting to grow it is the dried up catkin from spring, basically the flower, your nuts are within the spiny bur and not even sure those should have been picked yet. the bur will dry and split to reveal normally 1 or 2 nuts within. If you open up that bur and see the shell of the nut is slightly light colored it was picked to early. They should be a rich "Chestnut" brown. I can't tell for sure from the leave but I am leaning to NON- American, probably one of the Chinese from the leave shape being wider and what I can see of the spines on the leave

Subject: HELP - OFF TOPIC - AMERICAN CHESTNUT TREE Replies: 9
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 961
 

Most of the natural range will have blight present, but pockets of trees can be found even in the eastern states. And even in blighted areas trees still persist, but most frequently as suckers from an old root system. Some of these get large enough to bear prior to fungus affecting it, and some trees struggle with and manage to survive. If your trees were planted by man I would suspect they are one of the other species or a hybrid.  The leaves of American in general are relatively narrower and a thinner leaf that is less leathery. The Asian’s normally have a whitish cast on the leave underside and will feel very slightly fuzzy from small hairs on the leave underside.


Subject: HELP - OFF TOPIC - AMERICAN CHESTNUT TREE Replies: 9
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 961
 

Danny,

I have grown many chestnut from seed they were from AmericanXChinese Hybrids but the process will be the same. Do not let them dry out too much if you plan on keeping them in the fridge over the winter. I usually get a 15 Gal pot fill it to within a few inches from the top with a potting soil and then lightly push the nuts into the soil. I then would cover with some shredded leaves, just use a mower to make them and cover with a couple inches of the shredded leaves then cover the top with chicken wire or such to keep the squirrels out or else they find them all. When I have tried completely burying them completely most of them rotted into puss balls. If your winter climate is dryer then mine you could over them completely or if you were planting straight out in the ground. I think getting them a year start in the pot then planting out the second spring is much more successful. Be sure it is a pretty good sized pot that is deep enough and you can group plant a bunch in there a separate later. You can plant them in the fall now or if you keep them slightly damp in the fridge,NOT freezer over the winter. You are aware that if you are in the eastern half of the U.S. the Blight is still present and a pure American (castanea dentata) after they getting big enough for fissures in the bark they would likely be affected. There is a lot of great info on the web and development of blight resistant trees and general info on them. Truly one of the greatest biological tragedies in our country’s history as the Chestnut was such an integral part of our ecosystem with the mast crops it provided. I would start at this website, but there are many others http://www.acf.org/


Subject: E bay seller,selling false Ronde de Bordeaux. Replies: 106
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 7,324
 
I was able to contact EBAY and open report SR# 1-4613753440 with a direct link to this thread and the quotes from the seller within it. If you want to complain to EBAY they said you could report additional info if you want to the SR#

Subject: E bay seller,selling false Ronde de Bordeaux. Replies: 106
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 7,324
 
You can report it to Ebay and I will try to include the comments made by the seller on the forum here. Being ignorant is understandable, but after being enlightened a reasonable person would want to retain their reputation and integrity, not the path this seller has chosen.

Subject: Tastey Pawpaws Replies: 58
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 3,403
 
Ruben,
I can send you a few seed if you want them. The seeds are not from selected cultivar, as none of my grafted trees are producing yet.

Subject: Bees on my figs Replies: 28
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,738
 
Jason,
I probably didn't state that clearly I am not sure I have any of the actual Mason/Orchard bees Osmia family. There are a lot of native bees/polinators that I was not aware of until I tried to get them established a few years ago. what I find mostly nesting in my homes seem to be a smaller wasp/bee. If they are helping me pollinate or not I am not certain. It seems that ants seem to break the clay/dirt tube closure and I assume they attack the larave. I know there is several sub-species of Osmia, and most sold are of the western species and East siders should try and get from a eastern source I have read. I think there are sub-species most everywhere, but locally you may or not have a population. Just like I can't attract Purple Martins, but other around me do.

Here is a pretty good document on them. There is tons of info out there on them
http://www.sare.org/publications/bee/blue_orchard_bee.pdf


Subject: Bees on my figs Replies: 28
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,738
 
I have had Mason/Orchard bees housing Up for 3 years. I have had other small native bee/wasp nest in them but I don't believe any of the Osmia family yet that I am aware. They are mostly a early season Pollinator. I keep hoping to attract and build a native population, but I might just have to purchase some dormant cocoons.  Honey bees and yellow jackets is what I normally observe on figs, and when it is dry they really seem to concentrate on the figs,

Subject: Why buy fancy name paw paw? Replies: 5
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 651
 
11.2 oz is in line with some of the larger propagated ones. Paw Paw selection for cultivars is in it's infancy compared to most fruits. KSU Kentucky State U. has an active program, but the Genetics has probably been just touched and many of the commercially offered are wild selections such as yours or one generation from a wild selection. If productive with that size your wild tree might well be even superior. Other factors to consider is low seed count, and of course taste.  Some have a aftertaste many don't care for. 

Gr8Figs,  The North GA Wild Ones I have access too are smaller as well, maybe we were at the end of the line when they handed out PawPaw genetics.

Subject: Why buy fancy name paw paw? Replies: 5
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 651
 
Those are good sized from non-selected Pawpaw, many are not that large, how much did they weigh. Some select cultivars have a lower number of seeds. Wish my wild ones were that big. None of my grafted trees are producing yet. If they are by a creek like many native are that surely helped them deal with the drought.

Subject: so i ate some ants.. Replies: 27
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,039
 
I am right there with you Pete. I blow them off from the outside and go with it unless they have already consumed a good deal of it. Sometimes I wondering if that crunch is a seed or something else. We wait to long for uninvited late shows to freeload a meal.

Subject: Quiz...:what's that on my fig tree... Replies: 22
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,336
 
A bird decoy. Like folks do with red beads in cherries. The birds get tired of checking it out and then don't seem to notice when the fruit ripens to the same color

Subject: Dave Wilson Nursery Group order Replies: 21
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,913
 
Jon,

I will email you as well.

Tomcot Apricot
Flavor Grenade Pluot
Geo Pride Pluot
Emerald Beaut Plum
Shiro Plum
Pakistan Fruiting Mulberry
Chocolate Persimmon
Coffeecake Persimmon
Sweet Treat pluerry

Hoping this works out as I have been considering trying some more of Zaigers Interspecific Hybrids.

Thanks




Subject: floralife or other moisture retaining treatment Replies: 0
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 472
 
Has anyone ever played with Floralife Crowning Glory Solution or other anti-desiccation to prevent moisture loss from foliage of started cuttings. I was thinking about trying on recents pot-ups removed from a humid bin to help them adjust. I have a couple florist friends that use it and it does allow cut flowers to remain fresh longer. The label does note for use on evergreens and house plants, but not fuzzy leaved plants. I used to see  a product Wilt-Proof which I believe was only for broad-leaved evergreens and went on pretty heavy, but this stuff is very light and you don't even notice it on the petals of flowers.

http://www.floralife.com/industry_professionals/pdfs/Floralife_Products/FLORALIFE_Crowning-Glory_sheet.pdf

Subject: Mulberry tree Update Replies: 37
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 3,049
 

I failed on rooting Mulberry last year and am currently trying Kokuso No. 20, Shangri La, Middleton, Geraldi Dwarf, and Pakistan again this year. I am trying a liquid rooting hormone this year, but I think I kept them too dry last year. I am a terrible rooter (is that a word?) even on figs, my success rate is pretty abysmal. On the Mulberry and Pomegranates I am trying to root I am putting multiple cuttings in a tall 5 gal pot, and so far Shangri La and Middleton look good, but the others are just breaking bud. I hope there is rooting going on underground. last year I show good top growth, but they faded as there was no root activity. Maybe those that have better success rooting mulberry can share their methods here. I have never tried the Sphagnum moss, baggy, or other methods we detail here on figs, and if that’s what it takes I will try it.  I grafted 1 or 2 of each cultivar to my Illinois Everbearing as well, and I believe they all took, but then a late freeze knocked everything back. Even the I.E. itself lost all the foliage and many small limbs. The tree itself leafed back, but the grafts had not leafed back 2 weeks ago when I was last at my planting about an hour away. At least the I.E. itself will make a comeback, which is more than I can say about some of my persimmon.


Subject: Mulberry tree Update Replies: 37
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 3,049
 
Frank,

I grafted a couple spring of  2011 to Osage Orange root stock, but doubt I will see fruit for a while. I have seen folks post about their trees dropping the immature fruit each year and have yet to see a mature fruit after 7? or so years. Jon has some nice images of the fruit on his site so maybe he will respond. I have heard you either really like them or really don't. If i recall it was stated should really let them almost over ripen or they don't have much flavor.
 Tony,
If you remind me next winter I should be able to get you some Illinois Everbearing mulberry. I don't find mulberry east to root, but very easy to graft. I have some other cultivar trying presently by both cutting and graft to my I.E. tree. I am not sure about green cutting I have never tried to root them.

A note regarding both  Che and several cultivar mulberry from U.C. Davis just as you can figs right on the same order.

Subject: Reputation of this Tallahassee nursery? Replies: 7
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 895
 

  Rob,

The Pecans were all were tagged as named cultivars such as Cape Fear, Desirable, Stuart, and I think Choctaw.  I was thinking of picking up a Cape Fear as I need another Protogynous   pollinating one. Some Seedling trees will turnout ok eventually, but where as a grafted tree you would hope to be putting at a few nuts in 6 or 7 years, earlier if you are lucky, you could be will be waiting many years on a seedling tree.  I have 2 seedlings trees planted in 1998? As 2-3  year plants and I have yet to see a nut or even a catkin bloom on either tree. They are beautiful trees in full sun, rich bottom land soil, probably 35 foot and each year I am hoping this is the year they bloom.  After 12, 15, 20? Years you will highly likely have an inferior nut.  Unless you have space to trial huge trees long term I would advise on a grafted cultivar. Again if they are propagating pecan in a manner other than grafting someone can correct me. Lowes had grapes from them that were definitely mislabeled which could be just issues with the huge operation that Simpson Nursery is and I assume the supplier does the labeling and not Lowes, But I might be wrong there. The Pecan really bothered me because of the long term commitment.

Darkman,

I am sure you are familiar with Just Fruits and Exotics close to Tallahassee and I would highly recommend them to you. Brandy and her crew are good fruit people.


Subject: Reputation of this Tallahassee nursery? Replies: 7
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 895
 
At least here in GA. they source a lot of material to the big Box stores and to me they represent a lot of mislabeled plants .Not sure about problems with their Figs labeling but last year Lowes had Jumbo Muscadines from them which where obviously not even a muscadine, but some sort of bunch grape. They as well had grapes listed as Southern Home, a Muscadine hybrid with a very distinct leaf and they were not as labeled, but in the same shipment had the real Southern Home mislabeled as Southland Muscadines. This year my local Lowes has potted Pecans from them and I could observe NO graft union on any of the trees. The graft union should be readily visible on a tree that young, and unless they have been successful with starting pecans from cutting or tissue culture it appears to me they are sticking labels on seedling trees, which would be dispicable. The labels were all freshly applied as well and it appears to me they just slapped lablel to match whatever the order read.  The thing about a pecan it will be several years until one realizes they don’t have a plant true to label.  I thought about reporting the pecans to the Dept of Agriculture to see what they thought, but maybe nut tree propagation has advanced past my knowledge of recent.

Subject: Critter Deterrent Replies: 1
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 778
 

Sharing a simple inexpensive critter deterrent I have used this year after last year having squirrel uproot several newly potted up plants. The gray squirrels are attracted to any newly disturbed soil, and I have had them go through a bunch of pots uprooting everything and just pulling up cuttings not even eating anything.  I assume from their view the only reason to dig is to bury a nut or dig one up and they are looking to what I had buried here. They will do the same thing to newly planted in ground.  I am using a 25 foot roll of 2 foot hardware cloth. I think the openings are probably ½ in square I unroll it and place it on edge where it is rigid enough to stand up on its own when curved into a small corral. I shape the 25 foot roll into about a 9 by 3.5 rectangle with round corners then I top it with a 10 foot section of 4 foot chicken wire overlapping the sides by a few inches just pin the top to the sides every couple feet with a small stick weaved in the top through the top hole in the side and through the top again. A clothes pin would work well I believe.  They rarely seem to bother my plants after established, so at that point I will roll both wires up and lay to the side. I had some larger 5 gal pots that  I put along the outside that helped support the sides, but I don’t think it was that important and a smaller corral would be even  more rigid and if you didn’t cut the wire but just continued around it would be even more sturdy.  My setup is in a shaded area, but I could have easily laid some shade cloth over the top if needed.  If 2 feet is too short you may have to add a few stakes to keep 3 or 4 foot width wire from folding over. Quick, Easy, Portable, Inexpensive, and Effective. I sure others have worked similar deterrent, and along with dispatching of every  tree rat  I can get a sight on I think this year the score is about 20 to 0. As in 20 squirrels laid to peaceful rest to 0 plants maimed.

Attached Images
jpeg FigCorral.jpg (156.42 KB, 55 views)
jpeg FigCorral2.jpg (171.15 KB, 48 views)


Subject: simple step-by-step grafting Replies: 26
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 3,037
 
Excellent Ken,

I did bark grafts on a couple figs, pears, mulberry, pear, apple, persimmon myself this year. I find it the easiest and most forgiving graft to succeed with. The one downside is that it is not as strong of graft union initially, so try and keep the union wrapped and supported.

Subject: dragon mulberry Replies: 21
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 2,154
 

I have had no luck rooting Mulberries either. I am trying again this year but I am trying dip-n-grow rooting hormone at an un-diluted rate as a trial. I as well grafted some of each cultivar to my existing Illinois Everbearing. My plan was to try air-layering them if successful. Mulberry graft pretty easy, but Mother Nature has butted in. My Mulberry as well as many other things took major cold damage on April 12th, I know the trees will survive, but some of the Grafts appear to be on branches that were killed back. I was grafting on Kokuso No. 20, Shangri La, Middleton, Geraldi Dwarf, Pakistan. At least the Mulberry trees themselves will bounce back. My persimmons maybe not but I am praying I had a lot of damage on other things that should be hardy 2 zones colder and it did not even get that cold probably not below 29 F. but here in the warmest winter I can remember I have taken major cold damage due to extended warm periods in late winter.


Subject: Potting up Question Replies: 9
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,196
 
Thanks,

I ended up cutting bottom out of the 20 oz. which where the same height but wider and stuffing them into 16 oz. which gained over a couple inches in height. I would not have been able to place the 1 Gal. in the bins I have. Probably would have been easier to look around at some restaurant supply store for taller cups, which I didn’t find at the 3 or 4 places I checked, but I think this will work.



Subject: Potting up Question Replies: 9
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,196
 
Sorry Martin,

I did have that a bit small and I guess If want responses I better size it up enough so folks can read it. 

Getting ready to pot up some cutting from small bins of Sphagnum Moss and thinking about potting them straight into 1 Gal pots as opposed to cups placed into a closed larger bin. This is my 1st time trying the Sphagnum moss and wondering how many of you might be potting up direct in pots and skipping the cups. The Cups I have are only 16 oz. 4 ¾ in. deep, but the 20 oz. I found were not any deeper. I don’t stick the cutting all the way to the bottom and leave some potting mix below and assume others do as well? A good percentage of my cutting will have more cutting above soil then I would like, but I have not found deeper cups. I do have the 3x8 poly bags, but I don’t see that working with the fragile root starts on the cutting. I am curious from out of the Sphagnum what others have found most successful. I have had poor success rooting I have mostly used damp paper towel to cup in bin, with a increasing decrease in humidity leaving the bin on increasing periods, but seem to lose most everything after potting up. I keep blaming moisture control and I use close to 50/50 perlite/Pro-mix or other quality soilless mix but I don’t have much success managing cuttings with roots into plants. I know there is a LOT of threads discussing rooting and I have reviewed many of them, but I didn’t home in on one on after removing from Sphagnum what most folks do. Thanks.


Subject: What else do you grow? Replies: 48
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 2,632
 

I guess I am a general plant freak. Just keeping to Fruits and Nut.    Listing Vegetables and ornamentals would probably break me as I think in Japanese Maples alone I have around 50 cultivars and 200+ trees. Assuming all of my new grafts on to existing trees take on fruiting plants below will be pretty close.

10  type apples, 7 type Euro Pears, 6 type Asian pears, 5 type Japanese plum, 4 type Pluot, 24 type Asian persimmon, 7 type PawPaw, 22 type Blueberries, 6 types Pomegranates, 10 type bunch grapes, 11 type Muscadines, 3 type peach, 4 type Kiwi, 4 type JuJube, 1 Apricot,  2 type Sour cherry, 1 sweet cherry, Nanking Cherry, Bush Cherry, Goumi, Pineapple Guava, Gooseberry, 4 type Pecan, Chestnuts, Heartnuts, Black Walnuts, Carpathian Walnuts, Butternuts, Hazelnut hybrids, 9 type citrus, Blackberries, Raspberries, Mulberries, Che, Loquat, Mayhaw, Miracle Berry, Honeyberries


Subject: Potting up Question Replies: 9
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,196
 

Getting ready to pot up some cutting from small bins of Sphagnum Moss and thinking about potting them straight into 1 Gal pots as opposed to cups placed into a closed larger bin. This is my 1st time trying the Sphagnum moss and wondering how many of you might be potting up direct in pots and skipping the cups. The Cups I have are only 16 oz. 4 ¾ in. deep, but the 20 oz. I found were not any deeper. I don’t stick the cutting all the way to the bottom and leave some potting mix below and assume others do as well? A good percentage of my cutting will have more cutting above soil then I would like, but I have not found deeper cups. I do have the 3x8 poly bags, but I don’t see that working with the fragile root starts on the cutting. I am curious from out of the Sphagnum what others have found most successful. I have had poor success rooting I have mostly used damp paper towel to cup in bin, with a increasing decrease in humidity leaving the bin on increasing periods, but seem to lose most everything after potting up. I keep blaming moisture control and I use close to 50/50 perlite/Pro-mix or other quality soilless mix but I don’t have much success managing cuttings with roots into plants. I know there is a LOT of threads discussing rooting and I have reviewed many of them, but I didn’t home in on one on after removing from Sphagnum what most folks do. Thanks.


Subject: Kudzu Beetles Replies: 11
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,486
 
Mike,

I have them as well, but not that many. I was trying to figure out what they were a few days ago, and just googled for a image and thats what I have. I was fearing they were juvenile of the brown marmorated stink bug that is causing problems on a lot of fruits. They kind of have that stink bug shape.



Subject: Any suggestions where to buy a persimmon tree online? Replies: 48
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 14,357
 

Yes just rub of any competing growth on that branch. I think it is more important when grafting on young seedling that doesn't have the energy reserves that your mature tree does.


Subject: Any suggestions where to buy a persimmon tree online? Replies: 48
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 14,357
 

Looks good Ken, I think I recognize the writing on those tags. I think you timed it right as I have had good luck when the leaves are just starting to push like that.  On the scion is that just a single layer of Parafilm right?  I guess I really don’t know if a bud will push through multiple layers, but you might keep an eye when the bud is pushing growth. I few times I have taken a pin and carefully assisted a bud through by breaking an opening in  the Parafilm if the bud looked like it was struggling to break through.  You can most definitely graft Kaki to American Persimmon seedlings and if you are in a colder zone it is preferred to either Kaki or Lotus rootstock. Be sure and keep any shoots that try and grow on the branch below your graft rubbed of and it’s even more important if you are grafting to a seedling as that is key in having your scion thrive.  I think I will be trying to graft some fig myself soon, mainly because I am a poor rooter, and if they take then I will air layer them to get on its own root.


Subject: Any suggestions where to buy a persimmon tree online? Replies: 48
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 14,357
 
Ken,

I made a couple grafts yesterday on a couple young potted plants and up to my property today to make some more if they are breaking bud there as well. I will as well be planting out 12 cultivars I pick up last Winter at "Just Fruits". The bark graft Joe displays in the tutorial is what I have had best success with but a couple today the scion is really small probably end up a simple whip with no tongue due to size, probably a hard take worth the try. Let me know how your grafts take, kind of surprised your trees are not budding out there yet, my potted trees at the house are breaking bud and  will see about the inground ones at my cabin.


Subject: Any suggestions where to buy a persimmon tree online? Replies: 48
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 14,357
 
I have never had a bareroot persimmon die, and Womacks sends quality trees I think I have 12 from them and they come with massive roots. With this warm winter they might be budding out unless they are holding them in cold storage, I know some of mine are starting to leaf.

Subject: Walnut shells as a potting mix amendment Replies: 18
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 2,492
 

First let me apologize to the original poster for taking his thread way off course, and the general forum for non-fig related topic.

My chestnuts are primarily Dunstan Hybrids, but I have a couple open pollinated Layeroka and Skookum seedling plants. I prefer my Dunstans which are actually a couple of select seedlings from a grove of a hundred grafted Dunstan trees I planted back around 1989 but I no longer have that property. If you are going to be grafting over your chestnut try to get a closely related seedling to the scion you plan on grafting. The best would be a seedling from the tree of the scion. Grafted chestnuts sometimes exhibit graft incompatibility that may not show up until years later. I don’t believe Bob Wallace of Chestnut Hill nursery even sells his Patented Grafted cultivars anymore mostly I believe due to the graft compatibility issues. Bob is the Grandson of Dr. Dunstan who developed them.

 The Hazels I have remaining were actually referred to as Filazel when I purchased them. A filbert hazel hybrid (Corylus Cornuta X Corylus Avellana) Purchased from now defunct Bear Creek Nursery.  They produce small nuts similar in size to our east coast  native Hazel (Corylus Americana). If I was planting Hazel now, which I plan too when I find a space I would definitely go with some of the OSU developed Eastern Blight resistant/immune varieties.  You can graft over your seedling hazelnut to a non-patented varieties but most hazel are propagated by layering/stooling or tissue culture.

 You could well be getting nuts from your Carpathian at seven years, but I doubt any number at that age to make a significant contribution as an amendment to your potting mix.  The Grafted Carpathian’s I am growing are “Lake” and “Stark Champion” and they are young and not producing yet.

A couple of the better nut trees sources are Cliff England and John Brittain and their nurseries are linked below. They are both very knowledgeable on nut trees. 

http://www.nuttrees.net/

http://www.nolinnursery.com/


Subject: Walnut shells as a potting mix amendment Replies: 18
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 2,492
 
Alan,
Not sure what you are saying different about the level of Juglone then what I stated above, but pretty much every place I look does note that Black Walnut has significantly higher levels,  and I really don’t see much reference  lumping all members of Juglandaceae together in this aspect, but I do agree that I wouldn’t test on my one of my favorite figs. I would be curious where you found information about hundreds of black walnut sub- varieties, unless you referring to numbers of cultivars that are being  vegetatively  propagated. If that’s what you mean you might as well call every seedling  that has ever grown from nut a sub variety as they would all be unique to a small degree.
  I just didn’t want the poster to possibly mistaken hazelnut shells which I have seen used. Walnut shells might be used as well I just have not seen that.  With enough mixed shells I am sure you can have a fine amendment for your soil, but in 5 years I would not count on being covered up in nuts. I have not grown almonds but on the others in 5 years you will be lucky to have a handful of nuts from each of your trees. Even on grafted trees which the nursery listing of bearing age from my experience is very optimistic. If you are planting seedling walnuts, be they Carpathian, Black, Butternut, Heartnut etc… it could well be 15+ years to see your first nut. I finally got about a dozen butternuts from a mixed dozen of Black, Butternut, Heartnut that I planted in I believe in 1997 as 2 year old seedlings so hopefully I am getting close on the others. Your chestnuts and hazelnuts will be producing earlier,  at least mine have and at 5 years I probably got a handful of nuts, but on the Hazel it seems I rarely beat the squirrels to any.

Subject: Any suggestions where to buy a persimmon tree online? Replies: 48
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 14,357
 

Your first decision regarding cultivar should be if you prefer an Astringent or Non-astringent type fruit.  If you want to eat them when firm you will want a non-astringent.  They listed a lot of good sources but one I would add is “Just Fruits and Exotics”.  I think they are out of several cultivars at this point in the season, but they and “Edible Landscapes” probably have the largest selection that I am aware of.


Subject: Walnut shells as a potting mix amendment Replies: 18
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 2,492
 
I would use Perlite to me it does all you are asking for "lower weight, increase aeration and drainage, and reduce compaction"  and it really doesn't decompose much either and is relativly cheap. I think I pay $12 for a 4 cubic foot bag as it is readily available

Subject: Walnut shells as a potting mix amendment Replies: 18
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 2,492
 
Are you sure they are walnut shells. I have seen hazelnut/filberts used in potting medium but a walnut shell I am sure will contain Juglone. Google on juglone toxicity. Plants adversely affected by being grown near walnut trees exhibit symptoms such as foliar yellowing, wilting, etc... I have not seen Figs listed as tolerant or not, but I would not risk it.  I know black walnuts contain higher amounts, but all members of the walnut family contain it

Subject: Salvage a Moldy Cutting by grafting? Replies: 22
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,276
 

Thanks for the input. I seem to be hearing to up my game from bleach. I will have to look for a local source for Physan 20, seems widely available online. I have other fungicides already in hand of Daconil and Captan has anyone used  those? The active ingredient is different.  

 I have not heard anything along the line that the graft may be less susceptible to mold, but I may try it on one short cutting just to see. I would not have all my figs in one basket per say. These cuttings as well as a long transit were very green and I am thinking that might have factored in as well.


Subject: Salvage a Moldy Cutting by grafting? Replies: 22
Posted By: strudeldog Views: 1,276
 
Martin,

They were moldy I believe due to an extended delayed transit, that I will not detail here, but probably more due to my part then the sender. So although I do understand, probably I am more at fault in this situation.
Thanks


 

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