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Subject: Black Beauty 10 The best black this year Replies: 17
Posted By: Rewton Views: 658
 
Levar, no I haven't pulled it out yet but I'm well past due to do that and it may happen this Fall.  I have been growing KB for 5 years and have only gotten 1 or 2 figs in that time.

Subject: Black Beauty 10 The best black this year Replies: 17
Posted By: Rewton Views: 658
 
Dennis, this makes me happy.  I'm looking forward to getting fruit from my BB10 next year.  Mine is a robust grower and very healthy.  It put some figs on late in the season but I pulled them off.  Maybe I will plant it in the hole where my KB was!

Subject: Intervention required Replies: 15
Posted By: Rewton Views: 219
 
Wow what a great setup!   Did the greenhouse exist before your addition kicked in or was it a result of the addiction?  Very nice.

Subject: Black Greek (Marius) Replies: 15
Posted By: Rewton Views: 253
 
Michael, if I don't post about it next Spring please ask.  I will have a lot of in-ground fig cold-hardiness data points next Spring.

Subject: Black Greek (Marius) Replies: 15
Posted By: Rewton Views: 253
 
I really love this fig too.  To me it is one of those figs that is technically not a Mt. Etna but behaves a lot like one.  It's tasty and very productive and we will see how it does this winter in-ground.

Subject: Falling figs.... Replies: 7
Posted By: Rewton Views: 230
 
It seems to vary a lot by variety - some varieties in-ground are precocious and start bearing the first season (Violette de Bordeaux and related, Mt. Etna types, Zingarella-RW, Siclilian Red, etc) while others are not (Ponte Tresa, Scott's Black, Briguglio, Bordissot Blanca, Vasilika Sika-Belleclare, Battaglia Green, Kathleen's Black, Pastiliere etc.).  Some will also not produce after experiencing winter die-back while others will recover and produce a crop the same year.

Subject: What is your FIRST main crop in ground to ripen in 2017 Replies: 35
Posted By: Rewton Views: 725
 
Panfishman - Florea ripens 1st week of June in zone 6 from an in-ground tree that spent the winter in-ground?  Even if you are talking about breba I'm skeptical to say the least.  Please tell us more...

Subject: What is your FIRST main crop in ground to ripen in 2017 Replies: 35
Posted By: Rewton Views: 725
 
It seems that some of the posts on this thread refer to figs ripening in containers.  Please correct me if I'm wrong.  Judging by the title, I think Paully only wanted to hear about in-ground figs and that is where my main interest lies as well.

Subject: Falling figs.... Replies: 7
Posted By: Rewton Views: 230
 
RRedBeard, it would be helpful to know where you are located, your zone, etc.

I agree with the comment above that Bari does not need the wasp.  I put my Bari in the ground this past Spring and it set figs shortly thereafter and has been ripening quite a few.  I didn't notice any drop but mine is in its 4th season.  Other figs (both in-ground and containerized) have dropped figs this year though.  Many fruit trees (figs included) will set fruit when young but then drop the fruit.  The plant senses the capacity of its root system etc. and if it is not established enough yet it will drop the fruit.  Drop can be caused by other factors as well.

Subject: I never imagined this would work Replies: 16
Posted By: Rewton Views: 632
 
Yes, you want soil that wicks some water but not a lot of water - so you need a happy medium.  As far as the water being stagnant I was thinking it would be similar for the trays in the video as what you would have in an internal reservoir of a SIP.  You might expect the water in the trays being out in the breeze could be even more oxygenated than that in a SIP.  At any rate, the figs in the video are doing well so proof is in the pudding.

Subject: I never imagined this would work Replies: 16
Posted By: Rewton Views: 632
 
My guess is that if a fig had been in a container for a while without the water tray (and thus had a lot of roots on the bottom of the pot) and was then placed in a water tray the outcome might not been too good.  However, if you pot up a fig to a large container and place it in a water tray then the roots will grow down to the level of moisture they need and also adapt to the moisture conditions.  Figs growing in SIPs have lots of roots growing right into the water and they do very well.  Adaptation seems to be important.  Another issue with his set up, or a SIP, is that you don't want to use soil that wicks and holds lots of water.

Subject: What is your FIRST main crop in ground to ripen in 2017 Replies: 35
Posted By: Rewton Views: 725
 
Guided by the title of this thread I'm only going to count the figs I have growing in-ground and that were in-ground during the winter of 2016-17...
Scott's Black - dropped all its figs but putting out lots of growth; 2nd full season
Briguglio - did not set any figs; 3rd full season
Battaglia Green - set a good crop but dropped all but one; it is holding on but not ripe yet; 4th full season (or 5th?)
Nero 600m - has a good crop and started ripening about 10 days ago (wins prize for first; 3rd full season)
Zingarella (RW) - has a good crop but none ripe yet; 4th full season
Socorro Black - dropped all but one fig but its not ripe yet; 4th full season
Ital-258 - has a good crop but not ripe yet (yeah, probably foolish to have this one in-ground but I thought I'd try it); 2nd full season
Ponte Tresa - had a decent crop but dropped every one; 2nd full season
De La Reina - set one fig but it is not ripe yet; 2nd full season
Kathleen's Black - set no figs...maybe next year (Chicago Cubs of figs); 2nd full season 
Sicilian Red - has a very nice crop set but none ripe yet; 3rd full season
Vista - has a very nice crop set and started ripening a couple days after Nero 600m; 3rd full season
Vasilika Sika (Dalmatie type from Belleclare) - set no figs this year even though it had almost no winter die-back; 5th full season

Subject: Kathleen Black 2017 Replies: 16
Posted By: Rewton Views: 410
 
Peter, is it the agricultural lime which is pelletized?  40 lb around one tree is a lot!  Then again, the tree seems to be happy.

Subject: Wild figs in Sardinia - discovered new variety Replies: 15
Posted By: Rewton Views: 319
 
Very nice!  It looks like a great place to visit sometime.  Cheers.

Oh, why do you suspect the new fig is a Smyrna type - is it possible the fig you found might be a common fig?

Subject: Wild figs in Sardinia - discovered new variety Replies: 15
Posted By: Rewton Views: 319
 
Fico, where in the world (approximately) was the new fig found?  Thanks.

Subject: Kathleen Black 2017 Replies: 16
Posted By: Rewton Views: 410
 
Peter, I added lime when I planted mine but haven't added since.  I'll definitely try adding some and maybe also try some fertilizer (high phosphorous and low nitrogen) that is supposed to encourage flowers to bloom.  I'll search the forum for this but if anyone has any suggestions please post here.

Subject: Black Madeira and Figo Preto comparison Replies: 36
Posted By: Rewton Views: 3,292
 
Figit, that would be a question for CA growers; however, I would expect them to grow somewhat more slowly than your average fig tree in CA.  So it would be easier to keep these varieties pruned down to a reasonable size than varieties with rampant growth.

Subject: Kathleen Black 2017 Replies: 16
Posted By: Rewton Views: 410
 
Peter, congratulations on getting an in-ground KB to be productive.  Is this the first year that it has produced many figs?  Do you use any fertilizing regimen to encourage fruiting?  

I had mine in-ground for 4 years here in Maryland zone 7a and it only produced 1 fig during that time.  Who knows, maybe the new owner is getting fruit this summer.  One caveat is that during that time there were two polar vortex winters and there was quite a bit of die-back those two years.  I have another one in ground at my new place that was planted Spring 2016.  It did pretty well last winter with only minor die-back and has grown well this summer.  However, it has not set any fruit this year.

Subject: Madina Replies: 16
Posted By: Rewton Views: 306
 
Bill, thanks for chiming in.  Please do post your pics of Pellegrino when you are ready.

Subject: Madina Replies: 16
Posted By: Rewton Views: 306
 
Pino, it is a main crop fig.  So far my small tree has not produced any brebas but it wouldn't surprise me if it does when it becomes more mature.

I used to grow Brunswick and this fig does not split in rain and attract insects like Brunswick does.  It also has a deeper red pulp color.  The family of figs that it seems most related to is Dalmatie.  The main reason I decided to get cuttings of this one and grow it out is its apparently extreme cold hardiness.

Subject: Madina Replies: 16
Posted By: Rewton Views: 306
 
Here is the first fig of 2017 from my Madina. I had meant to plant this tree in the ground this year but never got around to it nor did I give it excellent care in its container this year. I'm sure it needs to be potted up and fertilized more. Nevertheless the first fig was huge! It's among the largest, or the largest, fig I've ever grown. It was also excellent tasting. It was noticeably sweeter near the eye than near the stem. Another thing of note about this fig so far is that the fruit is indeed "long and large" in keeping with Sergio's description but here it MD it has green/yellow skin, not blue/black.

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Subject: Preto, RdB, Valle Negra side-by-side Replies: 9
Posted By: Rewton Views: 361
 
Frank, I'm tempted to ask what type of granite that is as I'm in the middle of a kitchen renovation and haven't made the final decision about granite!  But the figs do look great!  I think my Preto is a couple weeks off still - did you start yours in a greenhouse?

Subject: The NEW Black Maderia -- Black Greek DJ Replies: 6
Posted By: Rewton Views: 497
 
Dennis, thanks for posting on this Greek fig.  What is it's ripening time compared to your other figs?  Is it fair to say it is a mid-season ripener?  If so that would be a step forward from figs like Black Madeira and Col de Dames for us mid-atlantic and northern growers.  Any idea about cold hardiness yet?

Subject: White Madeira Replies: 89
Posted By: Rewton Views: 6,695
 
White Madeira #1 is an excellent green fig with red pulp.  As far as I know I am the only one fortunate enough to have gotten it from Tam but it's possible there are others.  I planted the mother tree (now in its 4th season) in the ground this past Spring.  It is a healthy tree with no fmv symptoms but is a moderately slow grower.  I can't say yet how it compares to other green figs with red pulp but I am comparing it to Adriatic JH, Battaglia Green, Rockaway Green and several others in that class.  In addition to flavor I will be looking at cold hardiness, ripening time, vigor, productivity etc.

Subject: Noir de Barbentane fig Replies: 4
Posted By: Rewton Views: 184
 
I have one that is ~2 years old in a 5 gallon container and it has a good amount of main crop figs on it.  It's one of the new figs I am looking forward to tasting this year.

Subject: Disadvantage of RdB, Stella, or Florea? Replies: 44
Posted By: Rewton Views: 943
 
I took an airlayer from the tree shown in post #33 to my new place and planted it in the ground this past Spring.  It seems to me that the leaves have somewhat longer fingers that that shown for the mother tree.  It wouldn't surprise me if this changes as the tree matures.  So I am also skeptical about there being two different strains of RdB but stranger things have happened.

Subject: Disadvantage of RdB, Stella, or Florea? Replies: 44
Posted By: Rewton Views: 943
 
Scott, that is the most usual scenario.  However, even after the leaves drop the wood might not be as deeply dormant as it is later into the winter.

Subject: Disadvantage of RdB, Stella, or Florea? Replies: 44
Posted By: Rewton Views: 943
 
Mine originated from Danny at Brugmansia-Quebec who got it from Baud.  I suspect it is the longer fingered version but am not sure - let me know what you think.

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Subject: OMG first Angelo's Dark of the season starting to ripen! Replies: 10
Posted By: Rewton Views: 233
 
Oh sorry, I misread your comment.  Thanks for the information.

Subject: Disadvantage of RdB, Stella, or Florea? Replies: 44
Posted By: Rewton Views: 943
 
Joe, that's really different from my experience with RdB and I don't have an explanation for why.  It sounds like you may protect your various varieties better than I do but you also have colder winters in terms of the lows.  I will say that over the years I have been growing in-ground I have been lucky and have never had a situation where in-ground figs come out of dormancy and then are hit with freezing temps.  It seems like my in-ground trees here in MD take forever to come out of dormancy.  Other growers in colder zones are showing pics of their in-ground figs pushing out leaves and mine are still snoozing away.  I like to think that I have a longer Fall than they do though.

Anyway, I'll be watching to see how cold hardy RdB is at my new place compared to others - maybe my results will be more like yours this time?

Subject: OMG first Angelo's Dark of the season starting to ripen! Replies: 10
Posted By: Rewton Views: 233
 
No, Sal's-C is not in the Mt. Etna family.  It has larger fruit, ripens a bit later in the season, and has a different leaf shape altogether.

Subject: OMG first Angelo's Dark of the season starting to ripen! Replies: 10
Posted By: Rewton Views: 233
 
Is Angelo's Dark a fig in the Sal's-Corleone family? Does it have a prominent breba crop?

Subject: Disadvantage of RdB, Stella, or Florea? Replies: 44
Posted By: Rewton Views: 943
 
Joe, my experience is from an Ronde de Bordeaux growing in-ground in Maryland zone 7a.  So in a normal Fall it would gradually go into dormancy but, as you know, sometimes the cold weather can kick in before the figs are fully dormant.   I would say its cold hardiness is about average for the various fig varieties I have grown in-ground.  Mt. Etna types, Vasilika Sika (Belleclare), and a few others are superior.  I had mine growing near to an Adriatic JH and the cold hardiness of those two figs was about the same.

Subject: Disadvantage of RdB, Stella, or Florea? Replies: 44
Posted By: Rewton Views: 943
 
Here's my experience:

RdB in ground - moderately productive after 2 years in ground at my old place.  It seems to set figs late but fortunately once the figs set they develop quicker than most.  Cold hardiness is ok but not great.  The airlayer I planted in ground at my new place this Spring has two very small figs set that might ripen before frost.

Vasilika Sika (Belleclare) - I'm going to assume this is the same or highly related to Stella.  Is a healthy/beautiful tree that grows a moderate rate in ground.  It is very cold hardy.  Unfortunately after 4 seasons in ground it has never produced more than 2-3 figs.  They were excellent though.  I should qualify this to say that after the 2nd season in-ground I transplanted it to a new location Spring of 2016.  Since then it has put on lush/healthy growth in full sun but has not set one fig.  Yes... patience required!

Florea - I don't have one but from the comments here it sounds like a winner for in-ground growing in zone 7a.

Subject: My Kathleen Black pictures Replies: 8
Posted By: Rewton Views: 300
 
Paully, I had one for years growing in ground in the DC area and only got one small fruit even after lots of pinching!  I'm starting again at my new place and so far no fruit!  I don't know why I put myself through this when there are so many nice tasting productive varieties.  I guess because Gene Hosey grew this fig local to my area and raved about the flavor. 

Subject: Black Madeira: UCD or KK Replies: 20
Posted By: Rewton Views: 542
 
I thought I read KK's Black Madeira came from UCD and that his strain was propagated from a healthy branch thus giving rise to a healthier strain.  Perhaps one could call it a "sport" of UCD Black Madeira?

Subject: Root damage to house foundation Replies: 8
Posted By: Rewton Views: 241
 
I would think you would be fine unless your foundation already has (or develops) structural integrity issues from settling.  As stated above make sure the water drains away from your foundation.  If there are structural issues (i.e. major cracking) then roots from trees could make that problem worse.   I have read that if you live on a slab that fig roots going under a slab could cause problems.  It looks like you have either a basement or a crawlspace though.

Subject: Unk. Yellow with Pink interior Replies: 50
Posted By: Rewton Views: 1,198
 
Aaron is no longer on the forum (long story) but I think he runs this website: http://www.losangelesfigforest.com


Subject: Red Lebanese (Bekaa) Main 2016 Replies: 15
Posted By: Rewton Views: 418
 
I've had both the Bass version and the Marius version and they both good but quite different.  The Marius version has more of a berry profile than the Bass version if memory serves.

Subject: Assorted brebas harvested today Replies: 4
Posted By: Rewton Views: 168
 
These are brebas harvested today.  The top two are Filacciano Bianco (left) and Lampiera Preta (right).  On the bottom is Violette de Bordeaux.  FB and LP were grown in containers while the VdB was transplanted into the ground early this Spring.  VdB had the best flavor followed by LP and FB.  The FB probably would have been as good as the LP except it could have used just a bit more ripening.  Overall I'm more impressed with the VdB/Negronne family of figs than I used to be - they are definitely must haves.  The LP and FB were good but milder tasting.

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Subject: Auction for a good friend... Replies: 13
Posted By: Rewton Views: 563
 
Poalo Belloni's orchard was also struck by arson.  I wonder if the events are related?  Anyway, Brian this is really generous of you to help.

Subject: Warning very graphic! Seriously warning! Dead bird and chipmunk image in rat trap Replies: 13
Posted By: Rewton Views: 474
 
I have used the chipmunk "bucket of death" with success in the past.

Subject: Col de Dame Noir getting bushy Replies: 10
Posted By: Rewton Views: 278
 
No worries.  Your question is reasonable regardless of variety.  Some varieties put out a lot of suckers and others not so much.

I don't think it is VdB but it could be Longue d'Aout or perhaps Kathleen's Black.  What other varieties are you growing that it could have been mixed up with?

Subject: Col de Dame Noir getting bushy Replies: 10
Posted By: Rewton Views: 278
 
Here are some leaf pics from my CdDN.

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Subject: Col de Dame Noir getting bushy Replies: 10
Posted By: Rewton Views: 278
 
Kevin, I'm skeptical that the tree you have there is a Col de Dame Noir based on the leaves.  Then again, it is young and the leaves can shift to a different shape.  I'll take a photo of mine and post it here later.

Subject: Ponte Tresa question... Replies: 9
Posted By: Rewton Views: 546
 
Rafael, you are right - I was aware that you got it to fruit and I forgot.  Glad to hear you think it's promising.  I have a healthy one in ground and there are no main crop figs setting yet.  I also have one in a container that isn't as healthy looking (water stress/hydrophobic potting mix?) and it also doesn't have any figs set yet.  So I would be surprised if I taste it this year unless we get a very long Fall.

Subject: Ponte Tresa question... Replies: 9
Posted By: Rewton Views: 546
 
As far as I know, only Frank (FMD) has gotten it to fruit in the states.

Subject: Promoting fig production versus vegetative growth Replies: 22
Posted By: Rewton Views: 566
 
Yes, I agree that when young figs in pots with roots restricted will be more productive than those grown in ground if you are comparing trees of similar size.  However, I also have an impression (though have not done a controlled study) that figs from root bound trees don't have as good a flavor than those coming from happy/healthy trees.  A forum member from Nevada had a post about this a couple of years ago I think.  Eventually I think that in-ground trees will mature and put more of their energy into producing fruit.  What I'm not sure is how long this will take under my growing conditions.

Subject: Promoting fig production versus vegetative growth Replies: 22
Posted By: Rewton Views: 566
 
My RdB grown in ground also has not been particularly productive so far.  But my hope is that with maturity it will become so.

Subject: Promoting fig production versus vegetative growth Replies: 22
Posted By: Rewton Views: 566
 
Kevin, I am just short distance north of you in MD (same zone) and am noticing the same thing.  In fact I still have two in-ground figs that haven't fully leafed out!  I think a major issue is that we just haven't had very much heat (and sun) this Spring.  We have went into a couple warm spells but then come back to cool weather like we are in now.  I am thinking of pinching some of my figs in a week or so.

 

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