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Subject: Petite Negra Replies: 9
Posted By: LaFigue Views: 198
 
@BrightGreenNurse Thank you! It is indeed a nice dwarf tree.

@figpig_66 Thank you. My solution for birds: I am a whistler; I whistle classical music when I am in the yard. I also imitate the red cardinal's & the blue jay songs. I suppose Minnesota birds have not developed a taste for figs; who would blame them, I am probably the only person in the state with fig trees outdoor.
Cheers

Subject: 10th Anniversary Replies: 40
Posted By: LaFigue Views: 1,127
 
Hello Jon,
I feel your pain and frustration; I have been there. It is hard to take accusations, insults and other low blows when one is putting in lots of unpaid time and money to keep an organization/community going. Most times the kudos, expressions of support, pats on the back come only after the proverbial camel's back has been broken... Like others I failed to provide some moral support!
The forum you created and provided for was a huge community and a tremendous reference library from which I hugely benefitted during my one year of membership. From the bottom of my heart THANK YOU. I hope that you find it possible to re-open the forum. If not warmest wishes to you for present and future endeavours.

Marcel

Subject: Petite Negra Replies: 9
Posted By: LaFigue Views: 198
 
Thanks Courtney! It is a beautiful dwarf tree less than 24 inches tall which had over 50 figs on it.

Subject: Figaholics Figs from 2017 Replies: 8
Posted By: LaFigue Views: 381
 
Harvey,
What species or varieties did you plant, given that the blight nearly anhilited the American chestnut years ago? I come from Brittany where the tree is native. Such a beautiful tree with its long golden catkins when in bloom. But bad for people with pollen allergy.

Marcel

Subject: Petite Negra Replies: 9
Posted By: LaFigue Views: 198
 
Thank you fygmalion and Pino for your kind words.

Pino, I wished I could plant this P.N. in the ground; however, I believe it would take extraordinary efforts to protect it with winter temps reaching to -32F (-26C) and frost line down to 42 inches (over 1 meter). Often the first week of March we have sub zero F and no snow on the ground.

If the tree continues to produce over 50 figs, like this year, I shall be happy to keep it in the pot!
Marcel

Subject: Petite Negra Replies: 9
Posted By: LaFigue Views: 198
 
The figs on my Petite Negra are finally ripening. The potted tree was drastically pruned in late fall last year with branches reduced to stumps of the 7-year old wood and a 70% reduction of the roots. This severe pruning delayed the appearance of buds by nearly 2 months in the spring. I expect that next year the tree will be able to ripen its fruits much earlier.

Here a few pictures.
Marcel

Petite Negra_r.jpg  Petite Negra_r2.jpg  Petite Negra_r3.jpg


Subject: French amateur looking for real "Italian 258" cuttings. Replies: 33
Posted By: LaFigue Views: 706
 
Bonjour Zielin,

There is quite a bit of information on "Parretta" or "Paretta" on this forum; here is the link for my Paretta search on this F4F forum. Even a short video.

https://figs4funforum.websitetoolbox.com/search?keywords=Peretta&searchin=message&member=&do=findposts&replies=atleast&numreplies=0&daterange=0&custdatefrom=&custdateto=&sort=&order=desc&radio_showas=threads&btnSearch=Search&action=doSearch

Bonne chance/Good luck in your search for this or other varieties.
Marcel

Subject: Leaves changing from fingered to spade Replies: 14
Posted By: LaFigue Views: 278
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by VeryNew2Figs
I have searched and can't find the post, but there was a discussion on speculation on why leaves change their shape.  This is a Raspberry Latte (I'm pretty sure) that was started early this year, stayed in a half gallon until early August and up-potted to about a three or four-gallon container.  It quadrupled in size.  The leaves started out with all fingered leaves then changed to all spade leaves.  Any consensus as to why the leaves change form?


Cheryl, Is this the thread you were looking for?

https://figs4funforum.websitetoolbox.com/post/leaf-variability-causes-7059349?highlight=leaves+shape

Marcel

Subject: Fig Mosaic Virus Education Replies: 5
Posted By: LaFigue Views: 702
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by pitangadiego
See FAQ. Short answer is that it is a fact of fig life, just like leaves. If you have figs, you have FMV.


A research paper that might be of interest. The full paper can be read or downloaded for free from:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5461047/pdf/ppj-33-288.pdf

The following is a brief abstract

Efficacy of Tissue Culture in Virus Elimination from Caprifig and Female Fig Varieties (Ficus carica L.)


Abstract

Fig mosaic disease (FMD) is a viral disease that spreads in all Tunisian fig (Ficus carica L.) orchards. RT-PCR technique was applied to leaf samples of 29 fig accessions of 15 fig varieties from the fig germplasm collection of High Agronomic Institute (I.S.A) of Chatt-Mariem, to detect viruses associated to FMD. Analysis results show that 65.5% of the accessions (19/29) and 80.0% (12/15) of the fig varieties are infected by FMD-associated viruses. From all fig accessions, 41.4% of them are with single infection (one virus) and 24.1% are with multi-infections (2 virus and more). Viruses infecting fig leaf samples are Fig mosaic virus (FMV) (20.7%), Fig milde-mottle-associated virus (FMMaV) (17.25%), Fig fleck associated virus (FFkaV) (3.45%), and Fig cryptic virus (FCV) (55.17%). A reliable protocol for FCV and FMMaV elimination from 4 local fig varieties Zidi (ZDI), Soltani (SNI), Bither Abiadh (BA), and Assafri (ASF) via in vitro culture of 3 meristem sizes was established and optimized. With this protocol, global sanitation rates of 79.46%, 65.55%, 68.75%, and 70.83% respectively for ZDI, SNI, BA, and ASF are achieved. For all sanitized varieties, the effectiveness of meristem culture for the elimination of FCV and FMMaV viruses was related to meristem size. Meristem size 0.5 mm provides the highest sanitation rates ranging from 70% to 90%.

Happy reading!
Marcel


Subject: Took some pictures of the fig forest Replies: 21
Posted By: LaFigue Views: 1,654
 


Yes, plant invasion can be a concern and given the right environmental conditions can change a local plant community. See the following research.

Pattern and Process of Fig (Ficus carica) Invasion in a California Riparian Forest

Katherine A. Holmes, Steven E. Greco, and Alison M. Berry

Invasive Plant Science and Management January-March 2014 : Vol. 7, Issue 1, pg(s) 46- 58 https://doi.org/10.1614/IPSM-

Abstract

The common edible fig is a subcanopy tree that has invaded many of the remnant riparian forests of California's Central Valley. Fig is unusual in its ability to invade low-light, low-disturbance, native-plant–dominated environments. Dendrochronology combined with regression and spatial analyses allowed us to empirically quantify the expansion rate and spatial pattern of the fig invasion into the native plant community at Caswell Memorial State Park (Ripon, CA) over a 70-year invasion period. Fig uses a combination of short-distance dispersal, which results in constant, linear expansion at source population sites and long-distance dispersal, which eventually leads to high recruitment of satellite populations in ideal environments. Although fig initially experienced a long lag in its invasion rate, at the time of this study, it was expanding at an exponential rate at the landscape scale in Caswell. We identified a number of characteristics intrinsic to the fig population (shade suppression, pollinator presence, highly specialized reproduction, and propagule pressure) as well as extrinsic characteristics of the receiving environment (hydrologic alteration from the construction of a dam, safe sites for juvenile recruitment, and target effects from environmental heterogeneity) that may have influenced the rate and pattern of fig invasion. The Central Valley riparian forests have been reduced to less than 6% of their original area, and invasive fig is a significant threat to the remaining fragments of this important vegetation community. We include suggestions for fig eradication based on knowledge gained in this study.

Marcel

Subject: Fig Canker Replies: 0
Posted By: LaFigue Views: 88
 
Found this article on Fig Canker control that might be of interest to those members with fig orchards.

Interspecific hybridization of fig (Ficus carica L.) and Ficus erecta Thunb., a source of Ceratocystis canker resistance

H. Yakushi, T. Morita, S. Jikumaru, H. Ikegami,  A. Azuma, Y. Koshita

Euphytica January 2012, Volume 183, Issue 1, pp 39–47

Abstract

Ceratocystis canker, which is caused by the fungus Ceratocystis fimbriata Ellis et Halsted, is one of the most severe diseases of the common fig (Ficus carica L.). In contrast, the wild fig species F. erecta Thunb. is resistant to this fungus. We performed interspecific hybridization between the common fig (seed parent) and F. erecta (pollen parent) through artificial pollination. Even though hybrid seeds showed high germination rates, the seedling survival rates were low. All of the seedlings contained the expected simple sequence repeat (SSR) alleles from both common fig and F. erecta at each of the three loci tested, thus confirming the parent–offspring relationships of the interspecific hybrids. The leaf morphological characters of hybrid seedlings were intermediate between those of the parents. Cuttings of cultivars of common fig, F. erecta, and hybrid seedlings were inoculated with C. fimbriata by direct wounding of the shoot. All of the common fig cultivars tested withered and died within 10 weeks. Leaves and shoots of the hybrids and F. erecta were healthy 100 days after inoculation. Our results suggest that interspecific hybridization between the common fig and the wild species F. erecta is a breakthrough in the breeding of a new fig rootstock source with resistance to Ceratocystis canker

Enjoy!
Marcel

Subject: Scientific research on figs Replies: 16
Posted By: LaFigue Views: 401
 
Additional papers that might be of interest focussing on growing fig trees (cuttings, fig production and insects and diseases).

Effect of Tree Spacing on Vegetative Growth and Reproduction in an Early Growth Stage in Two Cultivars of Ficus carica L.

https://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article/jjshs1/77/1/77_1_7/_pdf

 The effects of different night trmperatures and the amount of hydroponic solution on the growth and fruiting of own-rooted fig cuttings

https://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article/jjshs1925/70/1/70_1_1/_pdf

Tree training and managing complexity and yield in fig

https://scholar.sun.ac.za/bitstream/handle/10019.1/3184/gerber_tree_2010.pdf?..

 Shoot Growth and Fruit Production of the Masui Dauphine Variety of Fig (Ficus carica L.) Undergoing Renewal Long Pruning

https://www.jircas.go.jp/en/file/8913/download?token=VYlLfsV_

Shoot Growth and Fruit Production of ‘Masui Dauphine’ Fig Trees Having High Limb Position with Downward Shoots

https://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article/jjshs1/82/3/82_215/_pdf

Fruit rot of fig caused by Phytophtora Palmivora

http://fshs.org/proceedings-o/1984-vol-97/327-328%20(EL-GHOLL)).pdf

Screening of fig varieties for rootstocks resistant to soil sickness

https://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article/jjshs1925/71/2/71_2_171/_pdf

Distribution and biology of the yellow-spotted longicorn beetle Psacothea hilaris hilaris (Pascoe) in Italy

https://s3.amazonaws.com/academia.edu.documents/33921999/Distribution_and_biology_of_the_yellow-spotted_longicorn_beetle.pdf?AWSAccessKeyId=AKIAIWOWYYGZ2Y53UL3A&Expires=1506041386&Signature=x%2F6jYgG3NJ8LpcKO4YpFrpf0IwQ%3D&response-content-disposition=inline%3B%20filename%3DDistribution_and_biology_of_the_yellow-s.pdf

Fig Rust in Hawai‘i

http://www.growables.org/information/TropicalFruit/documents/FigRust.pdf

Calcium chloride extends the keeping quality of fig fruit (Ficus carica L.) during storage and shelf-life

https://s3.amazonaws.com/academia.edu.documents/41671064/Calcium_chloride_extends_the_keeping_qua20160127-1385-16w573c.pdf?AWSAccessKeyId=AKIAIWOWYYGZ2Y53UL3A&Expires=1506036614&Signature=8AaM%2FYij1uANdMWmnV8v%2F7qSTOA%3D&response-content-disposition=inline%3B%20filename%3DCalcium_chloride_extends_the_keeping_qua.pdf

 
I hope these are of interest to members.
Marcel


Subject: Scientific research on figs Replies: 16
Posted By: LaFigue Views: 401
 
I am happy to see that the posted papers have been of interest, especially the paper on antidiabetic compound in figs. I thought that it might be useful to add to the list the following paper describing in greater details the components of the figs cited in the paper posted a few days ago:
Physicochemical and Nutritional Characterization of Brebas for Fresh Consumption from Nine Fig Varieties (Ficus carica L.) Grown in Extremadura (Spain)
https://www.hindawi.com/journals/jfq/2017/6302109/

Also it should be noted that some of the Spanish varieties of figs listed in the papers have been the subject of a topic on F4F forum see for example:
https://figs4funforum.websitetoolbox.com/post/pajarero-figs-6552397

Finally, if I may be permitted to mention a plant other than figs, there are some other potent plants for remedial management of diabetes. One such plant is the bitter melon (Momordica charantia) see the following paper and the link to get it:

Effect of  momordica charantia (bitter gourd) tablets in diabetes mellitus : Type 1 and Type 2

http://www.primejournal.org/IJGS/pdf/2012/mar/Hasan%20and%20Khatoon.pdf

My purpose for posting research papers on figs is strictly educational. I do not peddle or endorse techniques, products or treatments. And so a word of caution if you are interested in the herbal papers. As with any herbal treatment, please use extreme caution to insure that you are not subject to allergic or toxic effects or create a dangerous hypoglycemic state.

Happy reading!
Marcel

Subject: Squirrel fricassee? Replies: 12
Posted By: LaFigue Views: 260
 
Jehane Benoit, famous au Québec for her culinary knowledge offers the following: Fricassée d'écureuil au vin blanc (sautéed squirrel in white wine sauce) in Encyclopédie de Cuisine Canadienne. https://lechefpierre.blogspot.com/2016/01/ecureuil-au-vin-blanc.html

[DSCN2118]

Bon appétit!
Marcel

Subject: Pino's 2017 (main crop) Figs Replies: 56
Posted By: LaFigue Views: 1,090
 
Pino, I am quite concerned about your possibly getting indigestions :(  ; perhaps some care packages to destitute zones, like zone 4, could help......kidding!

Marcel

Subject: Scientific research on figs Replies: 16
Posted By: LaFigue Views: 401
 
@ Pino and Christine, There is much research on compounds in figs, fig leaves, fig backs for purposes ranging from use as insecticides or fungicides; nutritional and health aspects; cure of cancers, etc...
there are litteraly thousands of published research papers. I selected just a few references that I know you could download from the internet without paying for them or without having to  read the journals in the library of a major university.

@mgginva, Michael as above there are lots of papers on use of fig leaf extract(s) and leaf tea in reducing blood sugar. Thank you for passing the articles back to the "old timer" If there is a particular paper of interest, I could look for it as I have easy access to university libraries.

Sas, you are welcome!

Marcel

Subject: OT - Fig visitors Replies: 26
Posted By: LaFigue Views: 430
 
Pino, good picture of a praying mantis. I love the colors; it is different from the green one I see. Is this picture taken with a phone or a camera?

Marcel

Subject: Scientific research on figs Replies: 16
Posted By: LaFigue Views: 401
 
A couple of recent posts suggested that some members need to be energized with new food for the grey matter (cerebral activities). I have collected a few research papers on a number of subjects relating to figs. Perhaps one or the other of these papers listed below will be of interest to members.  Just cut and paste the URL into Google to get the individual paper.

Good reading!

Mediterranean basin Ficus carica L.: from genetic diversity and structure to authentication of a Protected Designation of Origin cultivar using microsatellite markers

 https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Evangelos_Karagiannis/publication/280923666_Mediterranean_basin_Ficus_carica_L_from_genetic_diversity_and_structure_to_authentication_of_a_Protected_Designation_of_Origin_cultivar_using_microsatellite_markers/links/55dda30f08ae83e420eed2ab/Mediterranean-basin-Ficus-carica-L-from-genetic-diversity-and-structure-to-authentication-of-a-Protected-Designation-of-Origin-cultivar-using-microsatellite-markers.pdf

Identification and characterization of a viroid resembling apple dimple fruit viroid in fig (Ficus carica L.) by next generation sequencing of small RNAs

 https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Michela_Chiumenti/publication/261292541_Identification_and_characterization_of_a_viroid_resembling_Apple_dimple_fruit_viroid_in_fig_Ficus_carica_L_by_next_generation_sequencing_of_small_RNAs/links/542850cd0cf26120b7b566d1.pdf

The ambiguous ripening nature of the fig (Ficus carica L.) fruit: a gene-expression study of potential ripening regulators and ethylene-related genes

 https://watermark.silverchair.com/api/watermark?token=AQECAHi208BE49Ooan9kkhW_Ercy7Dm3ZL_9Cf3qfKAc485ysgAAAdMwggHPBgkqhkiG9w0BBwagggHAMIIBvAIBADCCAbUGCSqGSIb3DQEHATAeBglghkgBZQMEAS4wEQQM80r3cksZ-0DkojXWAgEQgIIBhk_MaCX44dknsbllaDsoRhJwR3PVRKczL3E-oMLJHmgkgsWPeuzNGyanhCTcfUBQ0bY_7zZVkP6T7Po872T41r9494N2iy3kZfY5zRW21LvEOcbiTxs8f1CF4Bdlm40UhNaBZhEpqe22bmEguUggsFx1I5GokNBjg-T-u4NDJJlxysRpazUMHzWAIqiLrn59FRYELVEz7C1LW1e4DeqUus5DVlpsozFJkV7ms6D1xkIKlHwkZzKOhMK4IARzUm4mDljfCNDE2WMqe7TKS1-BKu8kwQRBy6CY0FMoLpcdITRB1fareXVoNpzEMZvWjmi2Zt89IN3cIOHF1YNeQJmsizA5jBduHXskVZx9pU5jCauJoNxmC-D1V2Tjg6X04JEDvvrUtpSVRkwLax6CdK-ycNDghPl7VDeuCpr73MvAHLs4AN6WsYr4mBUu95IEw8HwzjDKNwWxs4rPZSWq-IN3eX7Ab3zkM7rw59YMuoUvsYTjENpTCrfHG4EQaxMB0I_qcP1X0CZ_Gg

 Fruit skin side cracking and ostiole-end splitting shorten postharvest life in fresh figs (Ficus carica L.), but are reduced by deficit irrigation

 http://ucanr.edu/datastoreFiles/234-2626.pdf

 Protective effects of Ficus carica leaves on glucose and lipids levels, carbohydrate metabolism enzymes and β-cells in type 2 diabetic rats

 http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/13880209.2017.1279671?needAccess=true

 
Phenolic compounds, antioxidant and antidiabetic activity of different  cultivars of Ficus carica L. fruits

 https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Aneta_Wojdyto/publication/305732457_Phenolic_compounds_antioxidant_and_antidiabetic_activity_of_different_cultivars_of_Ficus_carica_L_fruits/links/57a2fb4108ae5f8b258d4e6b.pdf

 
Traditional uses, phytochemistry and pharmacology of Ficus carica: A review

 http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.3109/13880209.2014.892515?needAccess=true

 
First Report of the Fig Cyst Nematode, Heterodera fici Kirjanova, on Fig Tree, Ficus carica, in Ontario, Canada

 https://www.exeley.com/exeley/journals/journal_of_nematology/49/2/pdf/10.21307_jofnem-2017-056.pdf

 
DETERMINATION AND COMPARISON OF HEAVY METAL ACCUMULATION LEVEL OF Ficus carica BARK AND LEAF  SAMPLES IN ARTVIN, TURKEY

 http://kisi.deu.edu.tr/yunus.dogan/2016-OC-Ficus%20carica%20in%20Artvin.pdf

 

Shoot Architecture and Morphology of Different Branch Orders in Fig Tree (Ficus carica L.)

 https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Badii_Gaaliche/publication/291425493_Shoot_Architecture_and_Morphology_of_Different_Branch_Orders_in_Fig_Tree_Ficus_carica_L/links/575959c708aed884620acdbb.pdf

 
Phytochemistry and Ethnopharmacology of  Ficus carica

 http://www.journalrepository.org/media/journals/IJBCRR_3/2016/Sep/Bouyahya1412016IJBCRR29029.pdf

 
Marcel

 


Subject: Bisirri #3 Replies: 14
Posted By: LaFigue Views: 238
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by pino

Sas,
Not sure when numbering the Bisiri figs started.

This is my fig called Bisiri Black and it is one of my favourites.  Leaves do resemble to mt. etna type figs but has a much more intense berry taste.  
 


Pino,

Thanks for yet another beautiful picture.
What is your experience with this Bisirri Black? in ground versus pot growing; productive; ease of care; frost hardiness? Many thanks for any details.

I should correct the date of the passing of Mr Bisirri it should be 4/24 2017 NOT a/24/2017.

Marcel

Subject: Hep me pa-lese Replies: 7
Posted By: LaFigue Views: 280
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LeanderFig
Can you still eat the figs after using the copper fungicides?


Generally copper sulfate fungicides are contact fungicides not systemics, which means that they do not get into the plant system. You would have to wash the figs before eating them. BUT, PLEASE, READ the instructions on whatever product you use; different companies have broad concoctions that include insecticide as well.

Marcel

Subject: Bisirri #3 Replies: 14
Posted By: LaFigue Views: 238
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sas
This name has been floating around for a while. Could Someone tell us about their experience with the 3 Bisiri figs, here or perhaps in a new thread and if there's more than three? Thank You.


BUMP!

I am sorry to see that SAS' request has not generated a post or a new thread. Bisirri #3 is such a great fig; it would be interesting to hear about experience with the 3 Bisirri (#1-2-3).

On a sad note, during my search on Bisirri figs on another forum I found an announcement that Mr. Bisirri had passed away, at the age of 94, on a/24/2017.

Marcel

Subject: Fat Preto video Replies: 14
Posted By: LaFigue Views: 269
 
That looks delicious. Did you lick the knife blade? I would not have lost a drop of it!

Marcel

Subject: Hep me pa-lese Replies: 7
Posted By: LaFigue Views: 280
 
Kenny, it looks to me like you have rust fungus on your leaves. Has your weather become more humid/rainy in the last few weeks or have you been wetting the leaves of the figtrees while watering? This fungus spreads rapidly on wet leaves, so it is best to water the plants without wetling the leaves. Of course if your weather has become more rainy there is not much you can do unless they grow in pots and you can shelter them from the rain. (might not be too pratical...)

It looks like you have use some white powder on the leaf and trunk; what was that for?

You will need to treat the plants with a fungicide based on copper sulfate. Follow directions carefully. Even though it is getting close to the end of the growing season (I assume you are in the northern hemisphere), you should still start the treatment now.

Marcel

Subject: Pino's 2017 (main crop) Figs Replies: 56
Posted By: LaFigue Views: 1,090
 
Pino, WOAH!!! what a beautiful collection of figs; they all look so juicy. I hope my Petite Negra tree will ripen its figs and produce as good a fig as yours.

Marcel

Subject: Violet de Bordeaux Replies: 10
Posted By: LaFigue Views: 297
 
Dave, That is really a beautiful fig. It looks like your tree is just a year old but you have very good production.

Marcel

Subject: OT - Fig visitors Replies: 26
Posted By: LaFigue Views: 430
 
Pino, These little fellows posted by JDSFrance are not porcupines but hedgehogs...The porcupines have very long quills and are totally unrelated to the hedgehogs.

Cheers,
Marcel

Subject: OT - Fig visitors Replies: 26
Posted By: LaFigue Views: 430
 
Pinto, That is a nice shot of a katydid; I have never seen such a nice specimen. You keep your fig plot too clean that poor guy/gal needs some food!!!

Marcel

Subject: Justin Brooke’s method to increase yield Replies: 6
Posted By: LaFigue Views: 232
 
Sprout, you can search F4F a topic in 2014 dealt with this. Also search the forum Tropical Fruit Growing
Topic: Bark Inversion to accelerate flowering on a seedling tree. They have an extensive discussion and references to various videos and papers.

Marcel

Subject: OT - Fig visitors Replies: 26
Posted By: LaFigue Views: 430
 
Mea ma culpa, My mistake! more likely the Gray Tree Frog, which can change its color to match its environment> Here green to match the fig leaf color.

Marcel

Subject: OT - Fig visitors Replies: 26
Posted By: LaFigue Views: 430
 
Pino,

The "flyer" is a hummingbird moth; we see a lot of them here in Minnesota. As for the frog, possibly the American Green Tree Frog. It is a southeastern species that ranges from Louisiana/ Florida all the way to NJ.

Glad to see that wildlife members pay you visits!
Marcel

Subject: Modeling main crop ripening Replies: 13
Posted By: LaFigue Views: 199
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by zone5figger
No Randino figs for me this season... Season extention at the beginning of the season will improve your chances of enjoying maincrop figs, shuffle or greenhouse. Violette de Bordeaux types make some breba as well as very good mid-ripening maincrop figs, with a bit luck you should get to enjoy both!


Jesse, Perhaps next year for Randino!

Yes I can extend the growing season. But given my location in practically downtown and therefore a very small lot and limited storage space, I am working at finding the best varieties for this area. Varieties that have a higher likelihood of producing year in year out without too much of extraordinary efforts. Shuttling the pots, that I will do and am doing it with orchids, stapeliads from South Africa and even orange trees.

Thanks you.
Marcel

Subject: Modeling main crop ripening Replies: 13
Posted By: LaFigue Views: 199
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrdewhirst
BTW, I think ripening time is driven by something other than zone.  As I understand it, zone is determined by lowest winter temps.  Ripening date may be driven by warmth.  There are areas of the country that get just as cold as my area of RI (Z6B) in the winter but warm up sooner in the spring.  For example, growers in parts of PA and NJ that are also Z6B seem to ripen figs roughly 2 weeks earlier than me. 


Joe, you are right. Temperatures (degree-days) from the time the sap starts flowing in the tree early spring and amount of insolation versus cloudiness are the important factors in determining date the fruit will ripen, or a plant will bloom. This is why I have been asking for the date of ripening and the name of town/city so that I can get at local climatological data and compare this with my local data. As I said in my first post under this topic, I have successfully used that to determine when various plants I research in Wyoming/Utyah/ Montana/Colorado will be in bloom when I get to those places; otherwise I make a very long trip for nothing.

Zone is important in determining weather a plant/tree will survive without extraordinary care. Of course the further south the zone is geographically located, generally the higher the temperatures and again, generally, the greater the amount of sun. See map of insolation used for the purpose of calculating the output for a given solar panel.

Marcel

Subject: Ira J Condit answers to today's questions Replies: 4
Posted By: LaFigue Views: 249
 
For those interested in old texts relating to figs, here are two more that I enjoy.

Condit, I.J. 1927. The Kadota fig

https://archive.org/details/kadotafig4364365cond

 

Clark, W. Sam. 1920. The Kadota Fig a Treatise.

https://archive.org/details/kadotafigtreatis00clar

Marcel

Subject: Modeling main crop ripening Replies: 13
Posted By: LaFigue Views: 199
 
@Serge: Sergei, Many thanks. I hope you are beginning to enjoy some of your figs. The temperatures for the coming week should help their ripening!

@VeryNew2Figs: Cheryl, thank you for the data on Hardy Chicago. You have an impressive collection. Are all your trees in pots?

@zone5figger: Jesse, many thanks for the data on Improved Celeste, Florea and Ronde de Bordeaux. Is your Randino tree producing this year?

These data give me a feeling that most of my efforts should be concentrated on brebas, as even Florea and Improved Celeste, known has "early varieties", would likely ripen by mid to late Sept. for me. I should consider these and Hardy Chicago my "late season" varieties, with perhaps a cold grower like Randino!!!

Thank you.
Marcel

Subject: Modeling main crop ripening Replies: 13
Posted By: LaFigue Views: 199
 
@cjmach: Bob, Thank you for the info on Chicago Hardy both potted and in-ground. Your air layer from last October is doing great; it is now a huge potted tree. I have great expectations for next year. Many thanks.

@jrdewhirst: Joe, Thank you for the great information that gives me a good start.

Marcel

Subject: Hello new friends Replies: 8
Posted By: LaFigue Views: 108
 
Rockwell, Welcome to the forum. You already have a superb collection.

You will find that this group is full of experts who are always ready to guide us in our efforts with growing figs and eating them when they are at their peak.

Marcel

Subject: Modeling main crop ripening Replies: 13
Posted By: LaFigue Views: 199
 
I am attempting to determine whether the main crop of the following varieties grown in pot will ripen (and when) for me:

- Florea
- Black Malta
- Improved Celeste
- Hardy Chicago
- Italian Everbearing

Could members in zones 5 and 6 who grow any of these 5 varieties indicate when figs of the main crop have been ready to pick?  The data that would be useful to me would be:
variety name
date and year figs picked,
container or in ground grown,
City/Village name(if not concerned about privacy) so that I can get daily min/max temperarures and other weather variables.

For the last many years I have used similar information to predict when rare plants will bloom in Utah, Wyoming, Colorado so that I don't leave to do my botanical research some location 1200-1500 miles away and find that the plants are not ready. So far that has been very useful to me.

Thank you for your time and efforts.
Marcel


Subject: My First Malta Black Replies: 11
Posted By: LaFigue Views: 351
 
Frankallen,

This is a beautiful fig. If your tree is giving you ripe figs now in Sept. in 'Bama, what is the likelihood of the figs on my potted tree ripening!!!

Marcel

Subject: Bisirri #3 Replies: 14
Posted By: LaFigue Views: 238
 
@bigbadbill, given that the tree was only 5 month-old when the fig appeared and the plant is still in a clay pot barely  2 gallons, I was happy with a 21-gram fruit. In the spring it will be repotted in a 5 gallon pot and no doubt I shall have numerous and larger figs. Again many thanks for introducing me to a delicious fig.

@SAS Thanks for the support. That was my first fig and I felt like a proud grandfather!

@lowafig Yes, it is a great tasting fig and ripening in my short summer. My wife also thinks it is a great tasting fig (we shared 1/2 & 1/2). If you don't have this variety, you might want to find a space for it!

Marcel


Subject: Panache vs Col de Dame Blanc Replies: 13
Posted By: LaFigue Views: 386
 
Sas,

Beautiful figs and photos! Thank you for the excellent note contrasting your experience with each of these two varieties; very informative!

Marcel

Subject: Bisirri #3 Replies: 14
Posted By: LaFigue Views: 238
 

This is my first fig grown in Minnesota, zone 4b. I received cuttings of Bisirri #3 in Nov. 2016 from forum member bigbadbill. The potted rooted cutting was put outside the first week of April. While the year has been 20% cooler than last year, we still have had 108 days at or above 70ºF.

With the strong coaching from bigbadbill I picked this fig at its peak (see attached photos). Thank you Bill; it was as good as you said, sirupy jello, though not too sweet, that you could drink with a straw. I only wish I had a plate full of them...That's for next year!

Marcel

Attached Images
jpeg Bisirri-3-f4f-1.jpg (319.68 KB, 31 views)
jpeg Bisirri-3-f4f-2.jpg (203.06 KB, 32 views)
jpeg bisirri-3-f4f-3.jpg (232.52 KB, 32 views)


Subject: Adractic J.H. Replies: 28
Posted By: LaFigue Views: 706
 
Frankallen,
That is luscious and so mouth-watering!!! You are right; everyone should have such a tree..., unfortunately, not enough 70ºF days here in zone 4b.

Thanks for a beautiful post.
Marcel

Subject: I think my fig bush is dead Replies: 18
Posted By: LaFigue Views: 273
 
My advice is
To keep the pot in the shade;
Shade the pot with foil or plywood something that keeps sun rays off the pot;
maintain the soil somewhat moist;
Do not disturb the plant; this plant has been seriously traumatized and does not need further stress.

Based on my 60 years of growing all kinds of woody and herbaceous plants, I think you have a better chance of the plant recovering this way than to have success making a cutting of what is left alive of the trunk.

Best wishes for your Céleste recovery. Where there is green there is hope.

Marcel

Subject: I think my fig bush is dead Replies: 18
Posted By: LaFigue Views: 273
 
Christine, sorry to read about what appears to be the demise of your Céleste fig tree. If I were you, I would keep it in the shade and keep the soil somewhat moist but not wet some part of the trunk in the soil might still have a bit of life.

On plants which appear dead I usually use my thumb nail to make a small scratch on the trunk just above the soil line to determine whether there is still some green. If no green there under the bark, it is a goner. But then again, with figs, keep it somewhat moist in the shade for a while longer; a green shoot might appear from the root base.

Marcel

Subject: Figs in Zone 4b Replies: 20
Posted By: LaFigue Views: 420
 
@jrdewhirst: Thanks Joe. I have been scanning the postings to prepare a list of good producers of brebas in preparation for later during the cuttings offerings.

@Serge: Thank you Serge for your advice. And NO I am not interested in figs for bonsai (the leaves are too large!!!). My wife has already over 50 bonsai trees of various genera. In my area it would be impossible to keep fig trees in the ground without extreme efforts of winter protection as frost reaches down to 1 to 1.25m (40-50 in). A little further north in Minnesota frost reaches down to 2 meters (8 feet).

Today, in town was the Greek Festival. Much greek food was available but NO FIGS!!

Cheers,
Marcel

Subject: Figs in Zone 4b Replies: 20
Posted By: LaFigue Views: 420
 
Jesse,

Your advices are right on! As prevously advised by some members when I joined the forum last year, I have obtained some early ripening varieties: Improved Celeste and Black Malta. My RDB cuttings leafed out but never rooted.

This fall I shall be looking for Florea, RDB and Longue d'Août and also for the varieties for good brebas crop. I have kept my eyes on postings of list of heavy brebas producers.

Many thanks for your offer of cuttings; I shall PM you later when the pruning season has come for you.

Cheers,
Marcel

Subject: Figs in Zone 4b Replies: 20
Posted By: LaFigue Views: 420
 
Hello Serge,

As the growing season gets closer to being over here (statistically we could have our first frost in 4 weeks), it is painfully obvious that my sight should be on growing varieties with a good brebas crop and varieties that ripen a main crop very early on. I see from the list of varieties you have or are looking for that you have reached the same conclusion. As per the thread in this forum your Randino is a nice and very desirable fig.

I hope your summer will extend for a few more weeks and let you have a lovely crop of figs.

Cheers,
Marcel

Subject: Figs in Zone 4b Replies: 20
Posted By: LaFigue Views: 420
 
Jesse, thank you for your explanation of your oiling method and the general treatment of your plants in the fall. The oiling is different from what I know of the technique in France, as shown in the attached picture, where a pointed object (sharp feather, pointed stick, or sewing needle/pin) dipped in oil is actually inserted in the eye of the fig.

Various postings on fig forums state that, once ripe, the oiled figs have very poor taste. In France, authors who have mentioned the oiling technique have described the taste of the oiled figs as "slightly changed" but not as "bad". What is your taste experience with oiled figs of your varieties?

Again in various postings, it is advised to bring in plants having fruit yet to ripen when temps. dip down 50 ºF or so. Do you find that cooler night temperatures in mid-september have little effects on the ripening of your later figs?

My apologies for all these questions; your zone 5 conditions are likely very close to those in my zone 4b. and we are basically at the same elevation 930ft in my case. I do benefit from the "urban heat island" effect but perhaps you do as well.
Cheers,
Marcel

Attached Images
jpeg oiling with pin.jpg (70.95 KB, 10 views)


Subject: Figs in Zone 4b Replies: 20
Posted By: LaFigue Views: 420
 
Michael,
Sorry, no offense meant. I should have indicated specifically that the old French literature on the technique of leaf removal that I am familiar with never mentioned the technique being used to accelerate the ripening of the fruit.

I am aware of mentions on this forum of pinching and oiling. However, I was not aware of the specific defoliation that you cite and the link you provided. In the video cited, it seems that one side of the tree was defoliated. Was there a significant difference in the number of figs maturing and the timing of ripening between the two sides?

Thank you again.
Marcel

Subject: Figs in Zone 4b Replies: 20
Posted By: LaFigue Views: 420
 
Michael,

This technique of removing leaves on grapevines, peach, apricot, fig trees as well as tomatoe plants has a long history. For grapes it can improve % of antioxidants and the quality of the wine, as well as reduce fungal problems. In figs it is generally to allow more sun to reach the fruit and improve the coloration of the fruit. There is never mention of accelerating the maturing of the fruit, though.

Old French references on leaf removal (effeuillage) on fig trees can be found for 1874 in the French national journal of horticulture as well as the book "Les arbres fruitiers" by G.Ad. Bellair published in 1891.

I might try that on one of the branches to provide full sun to the figs on that branch.

Thanks for reminding me of that old technique, which I had forgotten.

Does Petite Negra produce brebas????

Cheers,
Marcel

 

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